Great Grooves from the History of R&B:

Daniel Glass: "I'm Walkin" - Fats Domino - 1956
Drummer: Earl Palmer - bpm 224

Joyful, spiritual, soulful, funky, downright stanky - even if some of these terms didn't exist in the '50s, they all apply when it comes to the incredible sounds that emerged from New Orleans during the early R&B era. With a rich cultural heritage that blends European, African, and Carribean rhythms, it is no surprise that the Crescent City's contribution to R&B music was deep and lasting.

Second-Line Feel:
A great example of how second-line was used in a classic R&B setting is "I'm Walkin", a big hit for Fats Domino in the mid-'50s. The song opens with a march style two-beat intro from drummer Earl Palmer, then kicks into a double time shuffle set against a syncopated bass line. Earl used this type of snare-oriented groove to great success on many hit records, including "Slippin and Slidin" and "Lucille". This groove is a perfect example of how New Orleans R&B musicians blended European (snare drum march) and African (rhumba bassline) influences to form a brand-new style.
More from this book here on Drummerworld:




NEW ORLEANS R&B: "Tipitina" - Professor Longhair



NEW ORLEANS R&B: "I'm Walkin" - Fats Domino



CHICAGO BLUES: The : "No Particular Place to go" - Chuck Berry



TEXAS BLUES: Texas Shuffle: "Cold Shot" - Stevie Ray Vaughn



FAUX RUMBA: "What'd I Say" - Ray Charles



THE DOUBLE SHUFFLE: "Keep A-Knockin" - Little Richard



PLAY-ALONG: "Chillin" - Style: Texas Shuffle



PLAY-ALONG: "Spellbound" - Style: 12/8 Feel




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