Pet peeves about drumming, other than schlep

JimmyM

Well-known Member
Yay. I banged my finger into a cymbal tonight...that means I'm getting good enough on drums again to remember my pet peeves about drumming. That's number two behind banging it into a rim. Never broke a finger but it made me mad when Josh Freese broke his at a Devo show and they had to stop doing Wiggly World, which they had just brought back into their sets in 2008 since their first tours. I really wanted a board tape of that. They never brought it back once Josh healed, either. Damn drums.

Other than that and the schlep, I can't think of any downsides to drumming. Cymbal buying is a bit annoying. I like to hit a bunch of cymbals as much as the next bassist, but I hate that I actually have to go somewhere and test it out before I even think of buying it so you don't get stuck with a used dud (I will never ever buy a new cymbal unless I get a deal, which isn't bloody likely). I almost got burned with a fairly expensive ping ride till I just went with its fantastic crash and not its insanely swelly wash, even after trying it. I thought I could control it eventually till I saw Diril's demo, which out of every single ride cymbal they make, mine is the only one that caused feedback. Heard that feedback...yep, that's mine. Sure taught me a lot about cymbals and stick control, though.

So good, there's two. Hard to dislike drumming, though. I'm having the time of my life. It's also a known fact that drummers often rank neck and neck with guitarists for the number two desirability position when you're looking to hook up, and at that point, it's down to looks. Bass players rank slightly higher than the oboe player. Now THAT is a pet peeve!

So what are your pet peeves? I don't want to fall into any traps along the way if I can help it.
 

Trigger

Senior Member
- Every time you buy an expensive cymbal, you then need to buy a stand for it.
- The more drums you have, the more expensive it is to change the heads
- You need to buy a billion microphones to make your drums sound good recorded
- Basically, its just really expensive. Thankfully the price of good drums have come down hugely in the last 20 years.
 

JimmyM

Well-known Member
It can get expensive really quick if you want quality drums, cymbals, etc.
Frankly, I'm shocked at how little it cost me to put together a great sounding set of drums and cymbals for my first stab at it since adulthood, and how little difference between top of the line and the major makers' beater sets there is anymore. Some of them even come with good heads. Except for cymbals, but if you try them out and listen with your ears and not your eyes, you can tell the good cheap ones from the bad. And if you go used, forget about it. Pennies on the dollar from what it used to cost.

- Every time you buy an expensive cymbal, you then need to buy a stand for it.
- The more drums you have, the more expensive it is to change the heads
- You need to buy a billion microphones to make your drums sound good recorded
- Basically, its just really expensive. Thankfully the price of good drums have come down hugely in the last 20 years.
In order:

-Maybe YOU do :D
-Sorted. I'm just not changing heads till they break. I like old heads better anyway. Less ring, more phat.
-I am really hoping I can find a lower budget way of recording that's still high quality than buying a bunch of specialty mics.
-Yes, Lawd!
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Having to vacuum around the kit. Tripods and vacuums dont jive. Stuff has to be moved. Splinters get into socks. The vacuum removes the tripod foot print in the carpet. No other musical instrument requires a good vacuuming. Seriously, it's a pain and I dont dig it.
 

JimmyM

Well-known Member
Having to vacuum around the kit. Tripods and vacuums dont jive. Stuff has to be moved. Splinters get into socks. The vacuum removes the tripod foot print in the carpet. No other musical instrument requires a good vacuuming. Seriously, it's a pain and I dont dig it.
Dustbuster? Hose?
 

BGDurham

Active Member
Having to vacuum around the kit. Tripods and vacuums dont jive. Stuff has to be moved. Splinters get into socks. The vacuum removes the tripod foot print in the carpet. No other musical instrument requires a good vacuuming. Seriously, it's a pain and I dont dig it.
This is a reason I want to gig at least every few months. Gigging gets all the instruments and sound gear out of my bonus room and that becomes my opportunity to vacuum the area relatively easily. I know, it's very rock & roll to think, "We have a gig! I get to vacuum!"
 

wraub

Silver Member
Like Mr IP, the vacuuming and cleaning around can be a challenge, and, tbh, the noise to/for others is a little much, but I admit I am in a fortunate position for that atm.

When putting together my set, I was kinda amazed with how little it cost to get it all together compared to my expectations. Maintenance, upkeep, and accessories can get spendy though. Moving them around is a thing, but getting all the stands and pieces back in the "right" places takes longer than expected. Maybe that changes with time.

The array of accessories and options available is a bit mind-boggling, which is why I am sticking with what I have and trying to improve on that. I like what I have.

So, a little messy, a bit noisy, a lot of fun and kinda expensive. Sounds like a good time to me. :)
 

felonious69

Silver Member
Get a compressor and a hose and blow all the dust and gunk and FREAKIN' CAT HAIR into "her side of the house".
 

felonious69

Silver Member
I actually did buy some compressed "electronic cleaner" spray cans to get at crevasses. It helps...a little.
 

cbphoto

Platinum Member
I am really hoping I can find a lower budget way of recording that's still high quality than buying a bunch of specialty mics.
Four mics: Kick, snare, overheads placed á la Glyn Johns method. It’s a wet sound in that it captures the entire kit and the room’s response/acoustics.
So what are your pet peeves?
The Load in/Load out: The schlep can be a real drag. What’s worse is, drummers must (not “should”) show up first (the FOH loves that and will actually smile), and leave last (because of all the other crap on stage has our kit trapped in the back). By the time all their crap is cleared and gone, the only people left are drunk yappers who wanna talk about their favorite bands while I am concentrating on packing all my parts away. They’re like gnats. That’s so peevish.

Snare Drums: They are a primary voice of the kit. Some day you will find a snare drum that produces the most perfect sound. Even more perfect than your current perfect snare drum. And you’ll buy it, and play it, and enjoy it, and love on it and polish it and clean it, and when you take it to band rehearsal to share your wonderful, perfect-sounding snare drum, no one can hear its perfection. You will be left eating your cake alone. Total peeve.

Bass drum pedals: Every 3–5 years your footwork will suck and you will think it’s the pedal. This is CORRECT!. Hustle out to your nearest shop and try out all 457 pedals available. Don’t forget to try the direct-drive, accelerator cam, rolling cam, and the spy cam. By the time your have finished the trials you will realize the pedal you have isn‘t that bad and what was really needed was just a little hamstring & Achilles stretching.

Bassists: They can either make you sound and feel amazing or suck the life outta the party. Choose wisely.
 

jimb

Member
I'll mention the schlep becuase of context. I think like you I come from a lifetime playing bass. Going from schlepping a single power combo and one guitar to the kit has actually put a dampner on my feelings about playing drums. At my age by the time Ive unloaded and set up Im almost worn out.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
It's also a known fact that drummers often rank neck and neck with guitarists for the number two desirability position when you're looking to hook up, and at that point, it's down to looks. Bass players rank slightly higher than the oboe player. Now THAT is a pet peeve!
For the unattached amongst us, I can confirm that drumming is a boon for upping your notch count.

A word of caution - this benefit shares a dependency with one of the peeves mentioned: teardown and schlepping gear. You've got to get your gear off the stage and stashed away before your date's enthusiasm wanes.

Just one more reason to gig with a 4-piece. 😁
 

JimmyM

Well-known Member
This is a reason I want to gig at least every few months. Gigging gets all the instruments and sound gear out of my bonus room and that becomes my opportunity to vacuum the area relatively easily. I know, it's very rock & roll to think, "We have a gig! I get to vacuum!"
Yeah, but I'll bet you don't get splinters in your tootsies!
 

JimmyM

Well-known Member
For the unattached amongst us, I can confirm that drumming is a boon for upping your notch count.

A word of caution - this benefit shares a dependency with one of the peeves mentioned: teardown and schlepping gear. You've got to get your gear off the stage and stashed away before your date's enthusiasm wanes.

Just one more reason to gig with a 4-piece. 😁
Or a Slim Jim Phantom set:

1641752949297.png

Slim Jim got the best hookups of anyone and didn't spend much time schlepping and setting up.
 
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