Pet peeves about drumming, other than schlep

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member

caddywumpus

Archnemesis of Larryace
I have a huge roadcase I carry everything in.

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Dang! In a pinch, that could be used as a drum riser!
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
I gotta tell you folks...this list you've compiled is more legit than I thought it would be. Only one OCD'r and a guy who needs to get a Dustbuster. Everything else sounds like pretty reasonable beefs.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Only one OCD'r and a guy who needs to get a Dustbuster. Everything else sounds like pretty reasonable beefs.
Being annoyed by trying to push a square around tripods is unreasonable?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I mean, kinda. It's the wrong tool for the job. Small shop vac. Long hose.
My drums are in my bedroom. I'm not going to buy a separate vacuum just for drums. When I vacuum the room, I do around the drums.

I don't have to move the bed, its square. I don't have to move dressers, they are square. I dont have to move the entertainment center or bookshelf, they are square. Only the drums need to be moved and I find that annoying, and in no way can you tell me that how I FEEL is wrong.
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
I mean, kinda. It's the wrong tool for the job. Small shop vac. Long hose.
Ya, a good shop vac is dirt cheap. I prefer a Dustbuster but a shop vac probably would save you from picking up the big shavings.
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
My drums are in my bedroom. I'm not going to buy a separate vacuum just for drums. When I vacuum the room, I do around the drums.

I don't have to move the bed, its square. I don't have to move dressers, they are square. I dont have to move the entertainment center or bookshelf, they are square. Only the drums need to be moved and I find that annoying, and in no way can you tell me that how I FEEL is wrong.
Oooh...someone needs a nap!
 

calan

Silver Member
Frankly, I'm shocked at how little it cost me to put together a great sounding set of drums and cymbals for my first stab at it since adulthood, and how little difference between top of the line and the major makers' beater sets there is anymore. Some of them even come with good heads. Except for cymbals, but if you try them out and listen with your ears and not your eyes, you can tell the good cheap ones from the bad. And if you go used, forget about it. Pennies on the dollar from what it used to cost.
Coming from the world of bass, how do you think it compares?

Not too long ago I picked up a Lakland Skyline, a good 2x10, and a 500w Class D head and don't feel I'm lacking anything, and realistically could have done with much less.

If you wanted a workman's, giggable rig for drums or bass, what do you think is easier to put together?
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Coming from the world of bass, how do you think it compares?

Not too long ago I picked up a Lakland Skyline, a good 2x10, and a 500w Class D head and don't feel I'm lacking anything, and realistically could have done with much less.

If you wanted a workman's, giggable rig for drums or bass, what do you think is easier to put together?
Bass by far, especially now with micro amps and cabs. A small combo that puts out 300w with a couple of 10's or a 15" that can handle 250w cleanly, a cheapo Fender type bass with decent fretwork and a pickup you like if the one in it bothers you, and you're sorted for life or until something breaks. Here it's agonizing over drum sizes, if every little lug and rod is going to hold, getting a comfy seat tailored to your special ass, pedals that let you do things with your feet in just the right way, positioning everything perfectly so you're not catching rims and shells all night, backups are nearly impossible to keep near you unless you have a tech and a large stage...and there is no escape from pricey cymbals, even though you can find good ones used at semi reasonable prices.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Really the only thing I have a peeve about is that sometimes other musicians seem to look down their noses at us, intentionally or un-intentionally, and not just because we're sitting while they stand. It's certainly not universal; I typically work with players who totally get the subtle parts of the drums we can bring to the table and don't just treat us like breathing metronomes who have the "easier" job; but I still run into people like that.
 

Janet Tambour

Junior Member
Having to vacuum around the kit. Tripods and vacuums dont jive. Stuff has to be moved. Splinters get into socks. The vacuum removes the tripod foot print in the carpet. No other musical instrument requires a good vacuuming. Seriously, it's a pain and I dont dig it.
If you have a hose on your vacuum check out the different sized floor brushes, I'm sure you can find one that will fit in the tight spots, and make it easier to clean around your sets. The hose is invaluable for getting under all the pedals.
 

calan

Silver Member
Bass by far, especially now with micro amps and cabs. A small combo that puts out 300w with a couple of 10's or a 15" that can handle 250w cleanly, a cheapo Fender type bass with decent fretwork and a pickup you like if the one in it bothers you, and you're sorted for life or until something breaks. Here it's agonizing over drum sizes, if every little lug and rod is going to hold, getting a comfy seat tailored to your special ass, pedals that let you do things with your feet in just the right way, positioning everything perfectly so you're not catching rims and shells all night, backups are nearly impossible to keep near you unless you have a tech and a large stage...and there is no escape from pricey cymbals, even though you can find good ones used at semi reasonable prices.
I suspected as much, but I'm not so deep into the bass and guitar world, and thought I may be being a bit too overly reductive about it.

So I guess my pet peeve about drums is the barrier to entry. It costs more. It takes up more space. It bothers more people. It takes even more time and money to make it them sound like you hear in your favorite song.
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Really the only thing I have a peeve about is that sometimes other musicians seem to look down their noses at us, intentionally or un-intentionally, and not just because we're sitting while they stand. It's certainly not universal; I typically work with players who totally get the subtle parts of the drums we can bring to the table and don't just treat us like breathing metronomes who have the "easier" job; but I still run into people like that.
That's because drummers generally don't take direction well, and you hit things and scare us. A lot of musicians don't take direction well so I'm not isolating it to just drummers, but because a lot of chordal/melodic musicians don't understand percussion and many percussionists don't understand chordal/melodic, we tend to get into our little dustups more than most. I think all chordal/melodics should double on percussion or at least know how beats are formed and sit behind the practice pads now and again, and all percussionists should know how to at least form chords and melodies on a chordal instrument, with piano being the most preferable.
 
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