Recording with Yamaha EAD10

Mastiff

Senior Member
Thanks for clarifying. I watched some videos that made it seem like some of the voices from the module were kind of extreme (like weird e-kit samples), which gave the impression if would sort of overpower the natural sound of the kit in some cases. Do I understand the correctly? Do the different selections on the module pass more or less of the natural sound?
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Thanks for clarifying. I watched some videos that made it seem like some of the voices from the module were kind of extreme (like weird e-kit samples), which gave the impression if would sort of overpower the natural sound of the kit in some cases. Do I understand the correctly? Do the different selections on the module pass more or less of the natural sound?
The 80/20 review has a nice section on acoustic sounds @ 9:05
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Thanks for clarifying. I watched some videos that made it seem like some of the voices from the module were kind of extreme (like weird e-kit samples), which gave the impression if would sort of overpower the natural sound of the kit in some cases. Do I understand the correctly? Do the different selections on the module pass more or less of the natural sound?
You CAN add crazy effects to it - but you can also have a clean sound. So you CAN turn your acoustic set into a bit of a hybrid kit - but you absolutely don't have to.

So the answer to your question is that you start with acoustic drums as the base - and there's literally a knob on the front that allows you turn up or down the amount of "Effect" "Reverb" and "Trigger" - couldn't be any easier!

There's a "compressor" setting that has a beautiful clean drum sound and you can add some reverb to it - that's my go to.
 

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Mastiff

Senior Member
As long as I'm derailing this thread... what are the pros and cons of the EAD10 relative to getting something like a Zoom R16 and a simple drum mic bundle?
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
As long as I'm derailing this thread... what are the pros and cons of the EAD10 relative to getting something like a Zoom R16 and a simple drum mic bundle?
The biggest con is that, with the EAD10, you're stuck with the mix you've recorded. You can't really mix anything after the fact. In situations where a polished mix isn't necessary, or, where the desired drum sound is "low-fi" or "gritty", the EAD10 sounds good enough and is simple to use. Funky, gritty drum sounds are very much in fashion in new music of the last decade or so.

But if you're going for a polished, professional album sound, in a more traditional style (country, rock, pop, singer/songwriter, etc.), then it's hard to beat multi-track recording. A common mixing issue with heavier music, is that the toms and snare get lost in the mix quickly, because of the aggressive sounds of the guitars and bass. Close mics can provide the support for the tom sound in the final mix. With a multi-track mix, you can momentarily bring up the toms, or any individual track, at key moments, to show off the important element in a song. Very rarely does a professional mix have the faders just sitting there the whole time. Faders are typically moving at key moments during a mix. Thus used to be done manually on large mixing consoles, but nowadays the fader moves are automated within the DAW.

A common issue with toms (and sometimes snare and bass drum) is that they're vibrating even when they're not being hit, due to sympathetic resonance from other drums. So you usually put a noise gate on them within the DAW to prevent the toms from making sound, unless they're being struck. You can't do this with the EAD10, so the overall drum sound will be more "blended". If you like it when the drum sound is well-separated, this might be a drawback.

The EAD10 is positioned underneath the cymbals, which could be good or bad. I've read more than once that some find the cymbals are too quiet; but I would also imagine that the tone of the cymbals is quite different than the tone coming from a pair of intelligently spaced overheads.

So it all really depends on your goals for the music you're making, and the recording/mixing style that is appropriate for the genre.
 

Mastiff

Senior Member
That all makes sense, but you didn't really mention any cons to the R16. Just price (once mics are added in)? Perhaps some learning curve to get things mic'd up properly? I haven't looked seriously at mics, but it looks like some entry level kits could be had for $300 or so, putting the R16 setup at about $700 vs. $500 for the EAD10.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
That all makes sense, but you didn't really mention any cons to the R16. Just price (once mics are added in)? Perhaps some learning curve to get things mic'd up properly? I haven't looked seriously at mics, but it looks like some entry level kits could be had for $300 or so, putting the R16 setup at about $700 vs. $500 for the EAD10.
I’ve toyed around with an EAD10 at the Memphis Drum Shop, in their cymbal room. It picked up the overall kit surprisingly well for where it was placed (on the bass drum hoop), and most of the effects were silly, over-the-top sounds that hid the true sound of the drums. I’ve not used the EAD10 for recording, but from what I’ve read here and on various other sites, the resulting audio can be a mix of your drums plus the tune you’re playing, or it can be just a stereo track of your drums. If the latter, you still need to produce a final mix in a DAW. When mixing a stereo audio track with another, there are more limitations than if you had individual tracks of two overheads, bass & snare.

If recording to a multi-track device like the R16 (I use a Tascam DR-70 with four tracks for some stuff) there is the total cost: Mics, stands and cables. Mic placement and the room plays has a much greater effect in how a kit sounds, which I find a fun and educational exercise, but some find tedious and too deep of a rabbit hole. The process of mixing can be more challenging also, but like anything it’s a learning curve that many have been on. Lastly, if you don’t feed your music into the R16 (two tracks for stereo), you’ll need to synch it to your drums in the DAW.

If you have a nice drum room, with high ceilings (8’ or more) and can control reverb, slap-back and flutter with things like moving blankets, and have the resources to hang mics and work on making your drums sound good, it’s a lot of fun and very educational. Drums are one of the more difficult instruments to record because of all the energy they produce, and how a room affects that energy, but once you get a mix you like, you won’t want to stop. To me, the EAD10 is a simple way to avoid a lot of the work in recording a kit, but get something you can enjoy and use to improve your drumming skills.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
That all makes sense, but you didn't really mention any cons to the R16. Just price (once mics are added in)? Perhaps some learning curve to get things mic'd up properly? I haven't looked seriously at mics, but it looks like some entry level kits could be had for $300 or so, putting the R16 setup at about $700 vs. $500 for the EAD10.
The R16 has built-in hard drive which you wouldn't need if you were using a laptop running a DAW, so you might be spending money on features you won't use.

Also, the R16 can't be added onto, like, for example, the Presonus Firestudio, where you can chain a few 8-channel units together. This might be an issue if you decide you want more inputs down the road. The R16 can only record 8 channels at once.

I think you can get an 8 channel Tascam interface for about $300.

Personally, I think the Presonus stuff sounds a bit better than the rest, because they've managed to put inexpensive, but good sounding, mic pres into their interfaces. I've used the Firestudio and the Studiolive mixer, and the sound quality was very good. I even noticed a difference when a band I worked with sold their Studiolive, and purchased a Soundcraft digital mixer. Everything else was the same (equipment, players, venue), but the sound just wasn't as clear or punchy.
 

BonsaiMagpie

Junior Member
I've got my adaptor now, USB B Male to USB A female and attached that to my smartphone cable. But when i open the Rec N Share app and try to record it says it needs to attached to a Yamaha Instrument. I feel a bit embarassed working in IT, but i can't get it to work. Is there anything i'm missing?
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I've got my adaptor now, USB B Male to USB A female and attached that to my smartphone cable. But when i open the Rec N Share app and try to record it says it needs to attached to a Yamaha Instrument. I feel a bit embarassed working in IT, but i can't get it to work. Is there anything i'm missing?
Only one thing I need to make certain of.....

You have the genuine Apple "Camera Adapter" kit that you bought from Apple, either in an Apple store or online at apple.com, and not just some generic adapter cable, correct?

There is only one dongle in existence that works.


 

BonsaiMagpie

Junior Member
Only one thing I need to make certain of.....

You have the genuine Apple "Camera Adapter" kit that you bought from Apple, either in an Apple store or online at apple.com, and not just some generic adapter cable, correct?

There is only one dongle in existence that works.


I'm using a Samsung Galaxy S10, which is on the approved device list, with this adaptor and a generic USB C cable.
I think the adaptor could be a problem, but I don't want to just buy another one if I am doing something wrong.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I'm using a Samsung Galaxy S10, which is on the approved device list, with this adaptor and a generic USB C cable.
I think the adaptor could be a problem, but I don't want to just buy another one if I am doing something wrong.
On the Apple side, the issue is that there are two different host device USB configurations, one where the iPhone is an output device (lightning to USB dongle to a speaker or display) and one where it is an input device (camera adapter), as if the USB-A/USB-B sides are reversed.

I imagine that the Android side of things has a similar issue, and that you will have to contact Yamaha support to find a supported USB host adapter.
 

BonsaiMagpie

Junior Member
On the Apple side, the issue is that there are two different host device USB configurations, one where the iPhone is an output device (lightning to USB dongle to a speaker or display) and one where it is an input device (camera adapter), as if the USB-A/USB-B sides are reversed.

I imagine that the Android side of things has a similar issue, and that you will have to contact Yamaha support to find a supported USB host adapter.
You were right, after speaking to Yamaha customer support they told me I need an OTG cable (on the go) this has an extra pin compared to USB protocols to allow the device to work in the way needed. I'm taking delivery of the cables i need tomorrow and I'll report back.
Thank you very much for your advice! :D
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
You were right, after speaking to Yamaha customer support they told me I need an OTG cable (on the go) this has an extra pin compared to USB protocols to allow the device to work in the way needed. I'm taking delivery of the cables i need tomorrow and I'll report back.
Thank you very much for your advice! :D
After you receive/test, Can you please link the cable you've ordered so that we may provide a correct response to subsequent posters with the same issue?
 

mrjones

Well-known member
Yes please post.i just bought a ead10 and haven't used it yet .I just bought a cable and it's a USB ab.cable hopefully it works if not I will buy the one you have
 

BonsaiMagpie

Junior Member
After you receive/test, Can you please link the cable you've ordered so that we may provide a correct response to subsequent posters with the same issue?
OK, so I have my cables and it's now working. I'll go through the process cause even then it wasn't very easy. Now, I'm also in the UK, so the cables I'm linking may not be available, but you'll at least see what you need. Remember, this is for Android (I'm looking at you guy in 2024 wandering round a post-apocalyptic wasteland trying to lay down a groove).

First, with the EAD10 off, insert your USB B Male - USB A Male cable. Then attach your OTG (on the go) USB A Female - Mini USB or USB C cable on to the end. It's really important that you buy OTG as a regular smartphone data and charging cable, like the one you get with your phone, is no good.

USB A-B: https://smile.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07ZNWJZV2
OTG USB C: https://smile.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07XRG4WLK

Next, launch the Yamaha Rec N Share app on your phone, and then connect the OTG cable to the phone.
Now power on the EAD10, your phone will ask you to allow it to access the EAD10 via a pop-up, and it will do this seemingly every time you connect it.
Now press the recording button and set up how you want it. The app manual has details on this part https://manual.yamaha.com/mi/app/recnshare/en/index.html You don't need to enter recording mode on the EAD10
Wait for the countdown and start
When you're finished hit stop and it shows you the audio and video to play back. If you want to hear this, either plug headphones into the jack socket on the EAD10 or disconnect the OTG cable and you can hear it back through the phone speakers.

I've only provisionally tested the technology at home. Gonna go to my practice space tomorrow and record something for you guys with the app.

Hope it helps :)
 
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BonsaiMagpie

Junior Member
I am going to connect mine to a laptop do I still need a otg. Adapter
No I don't think you do mate. I tried with the USB A-B cable direct to my laptop and it got picked up, though I don't have the software to record it on there.

Here's my first recording with the EAD10. Apologies for the terrible playing.
:)
 
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