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Mikethedrummer

Junior Member
So I've gathered that 6/8 would mean triplets so would need to group the 2 8th notes with the quarter note to make a triplet.
Then the 16th notes I cant decide to do the same and spread as 3 8th note triplets (making all 6 notes to the bar) or have the 1st 2 as a 16th note triplets and the 3rd an 8th note triplet.

Then the 2nd bar I would have the half note as a quarter note then the same as above for the 2nd grouping of notes.
 

TMe

Senior Member
Stuff like this makes me mental. If I look at three different books I see things written three different ways. I'm assuming a particular convention is used for your course, and you need to know that convention. All anyone outside of your class can tell you is how they'd write it, and they may not be using the same convention.

I suggest you give this a try: Sheet Music in 6/8
 
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GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
It's been a while for me, but I don't think 6/8 necessarily means triplets. There could be 6, 1/8th notes to fill the bar.

From wiki.....

A time signature of 6/8 means count 6 eighth notes to each bar. This is also a very often-used time signature. You would count the beat: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and so on…
Now you will wonder why can’t you just reduce 6/8 to 3/4? After all, they add up to the same amount. One reason you might pick one time signature versus the other is how the music is organized.
6/8 is grouped into 2 groups of 3 eighth notes. 3/4 time would be grouped into 3 groups of 2 eighth notes. Depending on the structure of the bassline or song, it may make sense to group it one way instead of the other. So 6/8 feels more like two, while 3/4 feels more like three.
 

Mikethedrummer

Junior Member
It's been a while for me, but I don't think 6/8 necessarily means triplets. There could be 6, 1/8th notes to fill the bar.

From wiki.....

A time signature of 6/8 means count 6 eighth notes to each bar. This is also a very often-used time signature. You would count the beat: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and so on…
Now you will wonder why can’t you just reduce 6/8 to 3/4? After all, they add up to the same amount. One reason you might pick one time signature versus the other is how the music is organized.
6/8 is grouped into 2 groups of 3 eighth notes. 3/4 time would be grouped into 3 groups of 2 eighth notes. Depending on the structure of the bassline or song, it may make sense to group it one way instead of the other. So 6/8 feels more like two, while 3/4 feels more like three.
Absolutely, for me the only difference between 3/4 and 6/8 is the feel, mathmatically they are the same, so the 6/8 time signature to me suggests 2 groupings of 3 notes as apposed to 3 groupings of either quarter of 8th notes.

So this being in 6/8 to me suggests a triplet feel to the pattern
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
That's what got me, because they are exactly the same rhythm, maybe written differently to throw me off?
They aren't:
6/8 = 123X56
3/4 = X23

Put the accent on the X and cycle the pattern infinitely. You will get it.

-OR-

Play the ride on all the notes, put the snare on the X. They feel different.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I hate to be pain in the are but "I've been given this as a "potential" question for a college exam". So "Potential" does this mean this is a study question your prof gave you or this is an actual exam question? Tell the truth now. Because if the former it's fine but if later it's cheating-so you're cheating yourself so really try to do it on your own. I was a science educator but music and other fields also represented here and I'm pretty sure all would want you to give it a good show-even if you get it wrong when you learn why you'll never forget the correct answer after all the struggle and effort.
 

Mikethedrummer

Junior Member
I hate to be pain in the are but "I've been given this as a "potential" question for a college exam". So "Potential" does this mean this is a study question your prof gave you or this is an actual exam question? Tell the truth now. Because if the former it's fine but if later it's cheating-so you're cheating yourself so really try to do it on your own. I was a science educator but music and other fields also represented here and I'm pretty sure all would want you to give it a good show-even if you get it wrong when you learn why you'll never forget the correct answer after all the struggle and effort.
It's an example of questions they give in an exam, not in the actual exam
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
So I've gathered that 6/8 would mean triplets so would need to group the 2 8th notes with the quarter note to make a triplet.
Then the 16th notes I cant decide to do the same and spread as 3 8th note triplets (making all 6 notes to the bar) or have the 1st 2 as a 16th note triplets and the 3rd an 8th note triplet.

Then the 2nd bar I would have the half note as a quarter note then the same as above for the 2nd grouping of notes.
Think of it this way, 6/8 = a triplet feel, counted in 2— dotted quarter note gets the beat, and you'll want to beam the notes in groups of three 8ths. You may need to break up one or more notes and use ties to put that exact rhythm in the correct phrasing. If that's not enough of a hint for you to get it, it means you probably need to go back and do some homework-- maybe the Mitchell Peters beginning snare drum book, or Joel Rothman's Basic Drumming.
 
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Mikethedrummer

Junior Member
Yeah that
Think of it this way, 6/8 = a triplet feel, counted in 2— dotted quarter note gets the beat, and you'll want to beam the notes in groups of three 8ths. You may need to break up one or more notes and use ties to put that exact rhythm in the correct phrasing. If that's not enough of a hint for you to get it, it means you probably need to go back and do some homework-- maybe the Mitchell Peters beginning snare drum book, or Joel Rothman's Basic Drumming.
Yeah that's what I was thinking, maybe I'm over complicating it thinking in 16th note triplets, cheers
 
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