Drumset on wheels

iCe

Silver Member
I googled and found a video on youtube here, but it doesn't show the rack side of the kit, nor who built it for him. I would be interested in the rolling rack for his main kick.


You're right. I didn't check the entire vid and i assumed that was the one i was referring to. I did a check and there are actually a few vids where be builds the rack himself. I'll list them below for you :)





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xYqW3pEuqk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nkigPq6rhc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZcMYUkeQMo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9ApiBcSF4o

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhHdfo7Uycc
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
I am working in a high-rise office space, and I want to store the drums in a 4x4 corner, then wheel it to the elevator, down to lobby level, then two blocks to city park
I don’t think casters are a good idea. I think pneumatic tires are the way to go, especially for [basically] pulling a rig around town. That means the axle would be 4–5” above the ground. Either the platform lowers to the ground and you position some gear (e.g., throne) off the platform, or everything stays on the platform and it remains at its portage height (i.e., no movement).

I also think leaving the kit set up and ready to play, on a 4’x4’ rolling platform requires a small kit, maybe no floor tom. If the kit is gonna be a 4-piece with hats and cymbals, your rolling rig is gonna require a “portage and storage configuration”.

Maybe the highest horizontal brace is only 2’ high and you use a hanging floor tom. This floor tom hangs on the inside of the rail during transport, and gets repositioned to the outside of the rail during performance.

Maybe after you design and build this thing, you make fat stacks selling it to others.
 

calan

Silver Member

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
@cbphoto - I was thinking pneumatic wheels the whole time using the word 'caster'. I make enough $$$ in my field of software engineering to worry about patents for a drum cart. I'm wondering how the patent police are going to come after me if I publish my design freely.

@calan - I think this project should be open source. Think 3D printers and CNC folk. We should be able to get enough input to nail down a design before spending one penny on something that doesn't work.
Maybe the highest horizontal brace is only 2’ high and you use a hanging floor tom. This floor tom hangs on the inside of the rail during transport, and gets repositioned to the outside of the rail during performance.
@cbphoto - I'm okay with the floor tom being stored in the length direction (w.r.t. rack footprint). The rack with plaform and kick (and hardware, and cymbals, and yes, throne) would be more than enough weight to offset the cantilever of the floor tom storage.

A hinged arm attached to the inner vertical rack post could facilitate that. Yes, I've been drawing sketches on my iPad. Too lazy to go through the process to post them though LOL.

The drumset should be one instrument. Roll it out and start playing.
 

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
The amount of over thinking on this thread is fantastic. By the time y'all are done, this thing will cost $70,000 and be part indy car.

A patent? How many drummers have the "down an elevator, out the doors, down a sidewalk, cross some streets, and go into the park to play" problem?

This is fascinating.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
The amount of over thinking on this thread is fantastic. By the time y'all are done, this thing will cost $70,000 and be part indy car.

A patent? How many drummers have the "down an elevator, out the doors, down a sidewalk, cross some streets, and go into the park to play" problem?

This is fascinating.

honestly, this convo will be better than the "money beat vs chops" one that is creeping up again...
 

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
honestly, this convo will be better than the "money beat vs chops" one that is creeping up again...
This thread is a fun read. I'm thinking about the solution in a completely opposite manner, but the ideas within are still fun. A rolling drumset with deployable landing gear, amazing!

I made the Indy car joke, but they are small, roll, and jack themselves up at pit stops. Sounds about right.

Thinking about someone pushing a drum kit down a sidewalk full of people is interesting. Nothing like that is even remotely close to happening here.
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
@cbphoto - I was thinking pneumatic wheels the whole time using the word 'caster'. I make enough $$$ in my field of software engineering to worry about patents for a drum cart. I'm wondering how the patent police are going to come after me if I publish my design freely.

@calan - I think this project should be open source. Think 3D printers and CNC folk. We should be able to get enough input to nail down a design before spending one penny on something that doesn't work.

@cbphoto - I'm okay with the floor tom being stored in the length direction (w.r.t. rack footprint). The rack with plaform and kick (and hardware, and cymbals, and yes, throne) would be more than enough weight to offset the cantilever of the floor tom storage.

A hinged arm attached to the inner vertical rack post could facilitate that. Yes, I've been drawing sketches on my iPad. Too lazy to go through the process to post them though LOL.

The drumset should be one instrument. Roll it out and start playing.
In the 4x4 storage spot, what is the max height the rig can be?
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
In the 4x4 storage spot, what is the max height the rig can be?
I'd have to measure but it has to be close to 10'. The door to the office is tall too.

But the hallway to the elevator, the elevator itself, and the doorways out the building are all potentially smaller. But I don't think the size of a rolling drum rack for a 3-4pc kit is going to hit that limit either, so.

On the pneumatic wheels, they need to be tough enough to handle some weight. I converted a utility cart some years ago that had pneumatic wheels with plastic hubs. Think adjustable length dolly sideways. After installing a box to the frame with ubolts, and filling it with my Pearl Reference 5-pc w Pearl rack, cymbals, throne and rug, those wheels were going flat big time.

But I wasn't using the cart as part of the playable kit. And the wood was 3/4" plywood. I miss that cart. I left it behind during a move in 2016. I think it was 20min to roll that from a 3rd floor apartment, down to the garage, and across the street to a park in Burbank, and setup ready to play.
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
I think it was 20min to roll that from a 3rd floor apartment, down to the garage, and across the street to a park in Burbank, and setup ready to play.
Wow!

Hannatv GIF by Amazon Prime Video
 

calan

Silver Member
I'd have to measure but it has to be close to 10'. The door to the office is tall too.

But the hallway to the elevator, the elevator itself, and the doorways out the building are all potentially smaller. But I don't think the size of a rolling drum rack for a 3-4pc kit is going to hit that limit either, so.

On the pneumatic wheels, they need to be tough enough to handle some weight. I converted a utility cart some years ago that had pneumatic wheels with plastic hubs. Think adjustable length dolly sideways. After installing a box to the frame with ubolts, and filling it with my Pearl Reference 5-pc w Pearl rack, cymbals, throne and rug, those wheels were going flat big time.

But I wasn't using the cart as part of the playable kit. And the wood was 3/4" plywood. I miss that cart. I left it behind during a move in 2016. I think it was 20min to roll that from a 3rd floor apartment, down to the garage, and across the street to a park in Burbank, and setup ready to play.
Elevator door openings are 7 ft tall, ballpark. Getting pneumatic wheels of the correct weigh rating shouldn't be an issue (of course, no budgetary constraints have been proposed yet...). I've used pneumatic wheels that were load rated something like 250 lbs per wheel. You can also just go solid rubber.
This thread is a fun read. I'm thinking about the solution in a completely opposite manner, but the ideas within are still fun. A rolling drumset with deployable landing gear, amazing!

I made the Indy car joke, but they are small, roll, and jack themselves up at pit stops. Sounds about right.

Thinking about someone pushing a drum kit down a sidewalk full of people is interesting. Nothing like that is even remotely close to happening here.
This is one of the more interesting thought experiments on the forum. I don't even necessarily see the utility, but the discussion can at least result in some kind of tangible results.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
Elevator door openings are 7 ft tall, ballpark. Getting pneumatic wheels of the correct weigh rating shouldn't be an issue (of course, no budgetary constraints have been proposed yet...). I've used pneumatic wheels that were load rated something like 250 lbs per wheel. You can also just go solid rubber. This is one of the more interesting thought experiments on the forum. I don't even necessarily see the utility, but the discussion can at least result in some kind of tangible results.

those PI carts all have the solid rubber tires...they are great or what we use them for. Smooth fake turf to gravel drives, they stand up pretty well
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
In the 4x4 storage spot, what is the max height the rig can be?
The door way is 7'11" x 35". The office ceiling is 8" higher than the door, so that's roughly 8.5' ceiling. More than enough for a drum cart.
 
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cbphoto

Diamond Member
The door way is 7'11" x 35". The office ceiling is 8" higher than the door, so that's roughly 8.5' ceiling. More than enough for a drum cart.
What’s the size of the elevator pad? 10 person? Freight?
 
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