Drummers and Motor Vehicles

Mediocrefunkybeat

Platinum Member
We're at a similar point with electric cars. Objectively they make a lot of sense for most people and would probably be the 'best' car in most scenarios - certainly superior to petrol. However we're only at the beginning and it requires a cultural shift for people to accept them. Range anxiety is a concern but you can't refuel your petrol car at home and many homes would have capacity for charging.

Most people don't do 200+ miles in one go regularly. Some do - but most journeys (in the UK at least) are fewer than 30 miles. Even when we go out on weekend adventures we don't tend to go more than 150 miles. When I commuted, it was seven miles each way. The furthest I've ever had to commute was 25 miles each way. I'm lucky - but an electric car would have managed that easily.

We're waiting for our current cars to become unroadworthy before we consider switching but we're seriously considering an electric car for our next vehicle. It would certainly do 95% of the travel we do without an issue and for the other 5% we could keep one of our diesel cars around.
 

1 hit wonder

Well-known Member
I'll wait for the early adopters to bring the price down. I'd drive one but I don't spend much acquiring a car.
 

calan

Silver Member
@TK-421 It was the ladder chassis rusting that did
We're at a similar point with electric cars. Objectively they make a lot of sense for most people and would probably be the 'best' car in most scenarios - certainly superior to petrol. However we're only at the beginning and it requires a cultural shift for people to accept them. Range anxiety is a concern but you can't refuel your petrol car at home and many homes would have capacity for charging.

Most people don't do 200+ miles in one go regularly. Some do - but most journeys (in the UK at least) are fewer than 30 miles. Even when we go out on weekend adventures we don't tend to go more than 150 miles. When I commuted, it was seven miles each way. The furthest I've ever had to commute was 25 miles each way. I'm lucky - but an electric car would have managed that easily.

We're waiting for our current cars to become unroadworthy before we consider switching but we're seriously considering an electric car for our next vehicle. It would certainly do 95% of the travel we do without an issue and for the other 5% we could keep one of our diesel cars around.
I would absolutely love an EV that can run for 12+ hours a day with no downtime and handle partial submersion. I absolutely love the center of gravity and independent wheel power available from an EV platform. I’m also still reluctant to trust anything other than body on frame for rough terrain (and I mean terrain), but that could be a superstition rather than reasoning.

I was really hoping my last gasoline vehicle was actually my LAST, but alas. I expect a minimum of 10 years of service out of the current rig, assuming gasoline remains buyable and economically viable. I’ll hope for an EV solution by then, but I could settle for hydrogen.

I don’t have much insight into the psyche of the average UK citizen outside of same gaming compatriots, and there is a real disconnect in commute times, and even what is considered a reasonable drive. Most Americans will think nothing of taking a 4 hour drive, and maybe even followed by a same day return trip. Some of that is structural; the US has generally only ever had an abundance of space to develop, and it’s been more cost effective to spread. Perhaps our collective ability to utilize vertical space has suffered as a consequence; enter the modern American urban assault vehicle/family wagon.

Most of us can’t pack drums for beans, either.
 

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
Yea I wonder if they now have that market space for electric and hybrid vehicles.

I hear we are heading towards EV anyways, which is why I got my electric panel upgraded to 220 for when that time comes, I will have it ready for a charge station.
Gonna need it. I just watched a few days ago the Ask This Old House episode about charging stations. A 100A service without gas appliances cant handle a car charger.

It really makes me wonder. We already have grid issues. How are we going to power all these vehicles in addition to everything else without making each home it's own power supply?

I just saw today that some big cities are banning gas stoves. That alone is going to stress the grid.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
Gonna need it. I just watched a few days ago the Ask This Old House episode about charging stations. A 100A service without gas appliances cant handle a car charger.

It really makes me wonder. We already have grid issues. How are we going to power all these vehicles in addition to everything else without making each home it's own power supply?

I just saw today that some big cities are banning gas stoves. That alone is going to stress the grid.
That’s a good question, maybe the solar panels that provide the grid with surplus energy is where we are headed.

Though I can’t find myself getting it, our neighbor has solar panels on their roof, becoming a pigeon roost.

Pueblo being one of ‘The Nation’s sunniest cities’ do know this at least and try to sell the crap out of paneling, they are everywhere here.
 

someguy01

Platinum Member
Gonna need it. I just watched a few days ago the Ask This Old House episode about charging stations. A 100A service without gas appliances cant handle a car charger.

It really makes me wonder. We already have grid issues. How are we going to power all these vehicles in addition to everything else without making each home it's own power supply?

I just saw today that some big cities are banning gas stoves. That alone is going to stress the grid.

F yeah science!
 

A J

Well-known Member
I still don't understand what a pickup truck does that a decent-sized estate car doesn't. At least in terms of transporting drums. I think you guys over the Pond have a very different view on size than we do...

Wife drives a Subaru and I like Hondas. This is what we use for 95% of our driving.

We also own a big, old 3/4 ton Dodge pickup truck and primarily use it for towing large trailers and a camper. A car could never do what the truck can do. For example, hauling a freshly killed deer carcass to the processor is a breeze with the truck. I can't see that going over real well with my wife's Subaru! :)

Of course, there are many Americans who just like trucks for no other reason than their "cool factor". They're becoming more and more luxurious with every passing year.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Platinum Member
I'm not saying that there's never a reason to have a pickup truck. My old Rugby coach had a pickup because he ran a building firm. It was definitely useful when he brought all of the kit down with him to training in it and we just slung it straight back in afterwards.

I know it's a cultural thing and possibly a sore point but the vast majority of the time, most people don't need a pickup. Going up a steep lane in the winter? A good 4X4 will do that, as will a modern 4X4 passenger car with good tyres (as Andy has demonstrated on here before). They're expensive to insure, uneconomical, handle poorly in comparison to most cars and often perform poorly in crash tests. Plus they take up a lot of unnecessary space and often ride poorly due to the antiquated chassis construction of most trucks. It's particularly baffling to me over here in the UK that they generally have petrol engines as they're the perfect candidate for diesel.

It's reasonably obvious that objectively, most people that have pickup trucks don't need pickup trucks and would probably do better with an estate car.

EDIT: My aunt used to have one! I've just remembered. Her occupation? Beef farmer. Makes sense.
I’ve owned two pickup trucks: a mid 90’s Nissan hardbody & a 2001 Dodge Ram. Both had extended cab, the Ram sat 6 adults (uncomfortably). I had a camper top on the Nissan and a locking tonneau cover on the bed of the Ram painted to match the truck and installed at the dealership when I bought it. Sold both.
Then I drove a midsize sedan for five years and now I’ve confirmed that I much prefer the safety of the larger vehicles (which we always had at least one because of 3 kids).

So I recently spent a lot of money getting the old ‘01 Rover road worthy and shiny. It’s been paid for many years and insurance is ridiculously cheap. I spend more on gas but no car payment (just the occasional repair lol). Plus it easily holds a full kit, and it’s fun to drive!
 

KenDoken

Junior Member
I drive a Toyota Hilux for work and find it satisfying to drive. Having an elevated driving position and bigger wheels makes it great on the road. 4x4, low box, diff lock, knobbly tires and high clearance allow me to get to some interesting places, although makes recovery harder when I finally get stuck ( hooray for alpine tractors )

I find the dropping tailgate makes it awkward to load and the high sill is a challenge after a big meal with tight trousers

Having a lifting tailgate and and a flat boot space at knee height with no lip makes loading so easy. Also automatic sliding doors are bloody brilliant for back seat loading
 

Mediocrefunkybeat

Platinum Member
@SomeBadDrummer When you bring up the concern of 'safety' and a 'larger vehicle' are you referring to pickups? There was a big thing a few years ago about pickup trucks getting surprisingly poor crash safety results (this is Euro NCAP, about 2008) partly because of the construction and partly because of the manufacturers building them as commercial vehicles (e.g. van-like) which de-emphasises crash safety.

It was only when they started being sold as family vehicles that this started to change.

Bigger vehicles are not inherently safer than smaller ones in everyday driving scenarios. It comes down to the safety systems built in to the cars and how they are designed to react in the event of a crash. A pickup built without crumple zones will perform badly in a crash compared with a supermini designed with crumple zones.

There are also the obvious effect on safety for other people when driving a vehicle with a much larger mass and the potential for larger blind spots. This is worth a quick read:

 

Ransan

Senior Member
@SomeBadDrummer When you bring up the concern of 'safety' and a 'larger vehicle' are you referring to pickups? There was a big thing a few years ago about pickup trucks getting surprisingly poor crash safety results (this is Euro NCAP, about 2008) partly because of the construction and partly because of the manufacturers building them as commercial vehicles (e.g. van-like) which de-emphasises crash safety.

It was only when they started being sold as family vehicles that this started to change.

Bigger vehicles are not inherently safer than smaller ones in everyday driving scenarios. It comes down to the safety systems built in to the cars and how they are designed to react in the event of a crash. A pickup built without crumple zones will perform badly in a crash compared with a supermini designed with crumple zones.

There are also the obvious effect on safety for other people when driving a vehicle with a much larger mass and the potential for larger blind spots. This is worth a quick read:

I see you are now mulishly bloviating about safety concerns when we have street legal sportscars that have no business reaching the speeds they can get.

1665930916883.gif
 
I see you are now mulishly bloviating about safety concerns when we have street legal sportscars that have no business reaching the speeds they can get.

View attachment 125622

I gotta agree with you 😂. So this has now become the make my case against pickups thread 🙄.
I didn’t see any bloviating about someone’s Mercedes’ posted here or any of the other vehicles that have their inherent problems both mechanically , safety, and or environmental wise . Nope! Just makes a case against pickups because of HIS own beliefs and underlying ideological standpoint It’s a matter of time in this thread when the bloviating and the condescending attitude stops and he starts calling people idiot , or twit or a host of other things he’s called people on numerous shut down threads the past few weeks when they don’t agree with him or subscribe to his way of thinking .
How many more posts pointing and alluding to why OTHERS should not drive a pickup will there be 😂, as if all us pickup owners are dullards and dolts and completely unaware of the pros and cons of our vehicle choice .
Insufferable comes to mind 😐🤨
 
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Mediocrefunkybeat

Platinum Member
I see you are now mulishly bloviating about safety concerns when we have street legal sportscars that have no business reaching the speeds they can get.

View attachment 125622
Crash tests are performed at legal speeds. A pickup truck can do 100MPH. What of it?

Just because you don't like the fact that pickup trucks are more dangerous for pedestrians and other road users and the data doesn't support them being better in a crash for the occupants doesn't change these facts.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
I gotta agree with you 😂. So this has now become the make my case against pickups thread 🙄.
I didn’t see any bloviating about someone’s Mercedes’ posted here or any of the other vehicles that have their inherent problems both mechanically , safety, and or environmental wise . Nope! Just makes a case against pickups because of HIS own beliefs and underlying ideological standpoint It’s a matter of time in this thread when the bloviating and the condescending attitude stops and he starts calling people idiot , or twit or a host of other things he’s called people on numerous shut down threads the past few weeks when they don’t agree with him or subscribe to his way of thinking .
How many more posts pointing and alluding to why OTHERS should not drive a pickup will their be 😂, as if all us pickup owners are dullards and dolts and completely unaware of the pros and cons of our vehicle choice .
Insufferable comes to mind 😐🤨
It’s not only that, it’s incessant barrage of dogmatic ‘pontification’ that is personal fool-wise gospel.

He gives us a lot of insight to hypocrisy by his diatribes.
Fails to point out SUVs that have now become the same size if not bigger than trucks, have poor blind spots and rear lines of sight.
You know I could care less what people drive I’m not going to tell them folly in it, it’s what is affordable and makes sense to someone. I mean we have classic vehicles and some from 90s onward that still make their way around the streets. Colorado doesn’t even have a state inspection so people make wooden campers sheeesh!

Not everyone can afford something that gives updated safety, and economic benefits.

MFB to be a defender of women but drags a lady who may or may not have stepped out, he’s just been hanging around off topic threads to claim righteousness.

Go to another forum, I’ve yet to see you talk drum related topics.

The forum has become his daycare center FFS!

Crash tests are performed at legal speeds...
1665938927047.gif
 

Mediocrefunkybeat

Platinum Member
I know you guys over in the States love your pickup trucks. There are legitimate reasons for owning them. But trying to claim that they're safer is a load of total rubbish. You're right @Ransan SUVs are also a total menance - but they're designed as passenger vehicles and have been designed with occupant safety in mind since at least the 90s. Which you can't say about pickup trucks.




If you don't like what I post, that's really not my concern in the slightest.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
Crash tests are performed at legal speeds. A pickup truck can do 100MPH. What of it?

Just because you don't like the fact that pickup trucks are more dangerous for pedestrians and other road users and the data doesn't support them being better in a crash for the occupants doesn't change these facts.
This is a horrible take. Go back and read the OP then see where you went off track…

No one but you are even trying to look up worthless stats to try and tell someone what they should be driving. Again go join a car and truck forum if you want to indulge in that highly opinionated crap.

It’s not that I don’t like it, I don’t think there’s much of a chance for any pedestrian verses a vehicle on any situation…
 

Mediocrefunkybeat

Platinum Member
It's not the vehicle that is dangerous, it's the loose nut behind the wheel.
How did Paul Walker die? Oh yeah.
If you're in an accident at legal speeds in a 1975 Mini, you're more likely to die than if you're in a 2015 Mini. Speed is a critical factor in many deaths - but no standard passenger vehicle is designed to crash at very high speed. The energy in a crash is much more affected by speed than mass, so speed is very important. Don't drive like an idiot and you're less likely to die - I don't think this is news to anybody.

But if you're saying that pickups are inherently safer, that's a load of nonsense.
 
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