What's the most popular size of Ride Cymbal?

silentsky

Junior Member
A couple of years ago I changed from an older Zildjian Amir 20" Ride to a 22" Sabian Paragon Ride, and while I like the sound of the Paragon better, I've recently played the 20" Zildjian at a couple of gigs, and kind of liked the smaller size. I was able to fit it into a tight space easier, and I don't have to reach quite as far to hit the bell. So that got me to thinking--what's the most popular size of Ride Cymbal? 20"? 22"? I was going to put up a poll, but that feature is disabled on this forum.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
I'd assume that 20" is the most popular size these days; if nothing else because that's always the size of the rides in the cymbal packs you can buy. Whenever I see other people's kits, there are probably 3-4 20" rides for every 21" or 22" I see, and larger sizes are a lot rarer than that again.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I agree that 20"s are easier to play but seem a little smallish to me. I've mostly had 22"s in the past and now have one of each (20" K and a 22" 2oo2 Ride). I wish there were more 21"s out there. That seems like the perfect size to me.
 

caddywumpus

Archnemesis of Larryace
According to how many rides are actually out there in existence, it would appear that 20" is the most popular size. Myself, I dig bigger cymbals and the more complex sounds that accompany them. My favorite ride is my 24" K Light Ride, and I also dig my 21" 50s A Zildjian, but I also dig my 20" HHX Stage Ride and 20" Kashian ride.

I go for sound, not for size. Thickness and taper is more important to me as far as how it impacts the sound.

If I had to choose, though, I'd say 21" is a good size.
 

Yamaha Rider

Gold Member
Looking for a Dream Bliss/ Vintage Bliss crash/ ride to use with a stripped-back, minimal kit - 20" bass, 1 tom, snare and hats and anticipate small venues, and grooves not rock-outs.
Would an 18" cymbal be too small?
And what do you lose with smaller rides? Presumably they are made for a reason?
I'd be worried the crash might open up too loud on a bigger cymbal.
Any thoughts,folks?
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
20" seems to be the standard, though I tend to go for 22" most of the time for both sound and feel. Sabian has pushed hard on the 21" size for decades, probably as some kind of "Goldilocks" size, and judging by how many 21" rides they sell, people must go for it.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
20" is the most plentiful size, followed by 22". From there it's probably 24", 21" and 18", 23", and then other weird sizes.

But play what works for you is always the bottom line.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Platinum Member
I've owned several including a gorgeous 21" Zildjian A Sweet Ride that was a bit washy and I used for more of a crash (which I just sold), but this 21" Zildjian Rock Ride is the perfect size with a fabulous cutting projection when needed.

Most important feature in a ride for me is the bell - this one is simply sublime.

I hit the hell out of it, but it keeps taking it for some reason.

IMG_8026(1).jpg
 

force3005

Silver Member
I have Sabians HH cymbals in 24" & 21" and a Zildjain 22" Constantinople Renaissance.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Looking for a Dream Bliss/ Vintage Bliss crash/ ride to use with a stripped-back, minimal kit - 20" bass, 1 tom, snare and hats and anticipate small venues, and grooves not rock-outs.
Would an 18" cymbal be too small?
And what do you lose with smaller rides? Presumably they are made for a reason?
I'd be worried the crash might open up too loud on a bigger cymbal.
Any thoughts,folks?
Two things come to mind. First, I don't think an 18 is necessarily too small. But second, I have used a 20" Istanbul Agop traditional ride to great effect in the application you describe!

I understand your concern about volume with the bigger cymbal, but it's lower pitch makes it less intrusive than you might expect. My Agop is quite thin, very dark, and ultra responsive, so it suits perfectly, IMO.

That said, an 18 with similar characteristics would work equally as well.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Platinum Member
Absolutely. All things being equal (profile, hammering, lathing, and so on), pitch decreases as diameter increases. In that sense, a 22" ride can be more subtle than an 18".
This is why I have Zildjian A's in 12, 16, 17, and 18" which fit perfectly with the 21" rock ride. I've been playing Zildjian A's since I can remember starting to seriously learn on my stepdad's drums at the age of 8 or 9. The 12" has been loved so much it has almost no ink, only the stamp. The hats are similarly loved, 13" Avedis and simply marvelous. (I have a set of 14" Sabian hats that are quite capable when I need a bit more volume.)

The 21" rock ride can be quiet as a mouse with some nylon tipped 7A sticks, or loud as a lion with my 2012 Neil Peart 747's when needed.

I no longer shop/look for cymbals because these A's are bronze perfection for what I want and play.

Rock on (y)

z.jpg
 

C.M. Jones

Diamond Member
I no longer shop/look for cymbals because these A's are bronze perfection for what I want and play.
Hear, hear, my good man! Zildjian As work splendidly for everything I play as well. I need no alternatives. I've never been interested in getting exotic with cymbals. Clean and articulate are the two qualities I require. Zildjian As never fail me.
 

Superman

Gold Member
I think 20" is the most popular. It is also the size usually included in prepacks being sold. That being said, I prefer a 21" or even a 22".

21" is just the sweet spot for me, but to each his/her own.
 

calan

Silver Member
20, 22, 21, 24, 18, 19, 23, and in that order. Assuming that's the size range we're considering (assuredly there are outliers, but I'd say this is the 'standard'). I'd put money on it, if there was any kind of reliable data to verify.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Platinum Member
Hear, hear, my good man! Zildjian As work splendidly for everything I play as well. I need no alternatives. I've never been interested in getting exotic with cymbals. Clean and articulate are the two qualities I require. Zildjian As never fail me.
There is no better line of cymbals at any price point. Some will have special inking, and some get beat up with hand hammering to create a different sound; others have different lathing, still others are thicker or thinner and then there are the cymbals produced from sheet metal that have their place for entry level players. But there’s really no comparison when looking at quality, history and most importantly sound when considering a consistent line of cymbals.
 
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