drum studio business

Lynchie

Member
I'm looking for some feedback... I'm an intermediate drummer who is looking start a business where I would take out a small loan and rent a space where I would buy some top of the line drums, micking equipment and charge a small fee for drummers looking to jam. The reason I thought this may work is that I would love to have a place to go and play to recording or with other instumentatlists and jam. Of course I would have to do some marketing and surveys before I would engage in this type of venture. Can I get some feedback as to whether this would work or not?
 

Monica McCoy

Senior Member
They have them in my area. They're called recording studios. LOL

It's $10-$20 an hour to jam. If you want to record it's like $50-$60 an hour and includes an engineer.
 

rogue_drummer

Gold Member
Instead of taking out a loan to buy equipment, why not try and get a music store(s) to sponsor you by providing their equipment free in exchange for free advertising? That way, you don't have to buy equipment (1 less expense item) and the store(s) get good exposure/advertising on thier merchandise with the understanding that if a musician likes the instrument after actually playing and jamming with it, then they can buy it for a certain % off the retail price.

I can't tell you the number of times I've sat down on a kit in the store, played a minute or two and liked what I heard, only to think, "If I could only jam with this to field test it to see how it really sounds in a group".

Playing it in the store is one thing, actually playing live in a group is something totally different.

Just a thought.....
 

Lynchie

Member
I understand that "studios" may have all this stuff available (and I'm not a studio expert)...I was thinking of something a little smaller scale. I would guess studios have all the recording equipment etc. I would provide various drums, various cymbals and a place to sit down and pound to a song or jam with some musicians...I liked the idea of having a music store do some sponsoring. Do you think I could pay the rent? Or do you think I could get some intested participants?
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
I think it would be cool to turn an old motel into something like that. It would already have separate, locked rooms and even individual restrooms. You could have rooms with acoustic sets and rooms with V-Drums. It would take a lot of soundproofing though.

Local drum teachers may be interested in renting from you as well.

Jeff
 

Lynchie

Member
I think it would be cool to turn an old motel into something like that. It would already have separate, locked rooms and even individual restrooms. You could have rooms with acoustic sets and rooms with V-Drums. It would take a lot of soundproofing though.

Local drum teachers may be interested in renting from you as well.

Jeff

Jeff', that's somewhat my vision. Start out where I provide some equipment and then incorporate drum instructors as needed. My problem with that is that I myself have tried to find professional intructors to no avail. I may have even discussed this with you in the past. My area is not quite the boonies. I live in southern MD and the area is quite booming. We are not yet a metropolis but are not yet fully urban (sort-of). I think there are alot of people (young and old) who may want to have some facilities to do something like this...I know I would. My drums sit in my cold garage...If I had some place to play I would surely take advantage of it... Thoughts?
That
 

Lynchie

Member
All,
What would it cost to provide some professional drummer to come in and do a clinique (sp)? OR have some outside drum instuctors come in and provide lessons. Would we be talking room and board and fees?
 
I've never hosted a clinic, but I would imagine it operates the same way as running a show where bands play.

Depending on how "big" the drummer you would want to bring in is, there's probably a fee just to have them come out, plus a rider (contract entailing what else outside of money you would have to provide, ie, hotel, food, drinks, etc.).
 

Paul Quin

Pioneer Member
I've never hosted a clinic, but I would imagine it operates the same way as running a show where bands play.

Depending on how "big" the drummer you would want to bring in is, there's probably a fee just to have them come out, plus a rider (contract entailing what else outside of money you would have to provide, ie, hotel, food, drinks, etc.).

Generally speaking, drum/cymbal/head companies are more reluctant to sponsor clinics which do not involve a retail establishment. While some stores may pay a portion of the clinician's fee, it is more common that the endorsee companies pay the clinician his or her fee and pay expenses. Those fees tend to range from the $500 to $2,000 mark, depending on the clinician. That fee is often split between those endorsee companies through negotiation and agreement.

There would, however, be nothing wrong with sponsoring the clinic yourself and paying the fees but I am not sure that it would be financially feasible or a good investment for your business venture.

Good luck

Paul
 

Lynchie

Member
OK...let me spin this around some. Does anyone have a advice about equipment and space? My thoughts were this...Rent space where drumming would not be a nuisence (obviously). Purchase a top of the line kit. Maybe a kit that would fit a wide variety of players. A standard cymbal set up with some replacement cybals for different needs etc. Creat a stage to set a mood and proper miking and maybe some lighting. Basically a stage setting. And lastly sa sound system to bag to songs. This would not really be a recoring studio... Does that seem feasible for to atract any customers? Suggestions? If it turned out where various musicians, apart from dummers, got interested, I could expand.
 

zzdrummer

Senior Member
OK...let me spin this around some. Does anyone have a advice about equipment and space? My thoughts were this...Rent space where drumming would not be a nuisence (obviously). Purchase a top of the line kit. Maybe a kit that would fit a wide variety of players. A standard cymbal set up with some replacement cybals for different needs etc. Creat a stage to set a mood and proper miking and maybe some lighting. Basically a stage setting. And lastly sa sound system to bag to songs. This would not really be a recoring studio... Does that seem feasible for to atract any customers? Suggestions? If it turned out where various musicians, apart from dummers, got interested, I could expand.

I dunno, sorta seems like you could have more earning potential just to make it a recording studio, then all mucisians would be interested ect. That would work I think, or with the whole stage businness sounds like you kinda want a club, I think if you were to record you could charge more, have more people interested, and make more money than people coming to practice. For example. I have a kit at my house and can practice, but if I ever wanted to record with my band, I would use your place, so you could attract a lot of customers that way. And you can have a recording studio and still rent out rooms for practicing, so you could use it for your original purpose to. However, that would take knowledge, a lot of work and startup money, so it would be tougher to do.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
OK...let me spin this around some. Does anyone have a advice about equipment and space? My thoughts were this...Rent space where drumming would not be a nuisence (obviously). Purchase a top of the line kit. Maybe a kit that would fit a wide variety of players. A standard cymbal set up with some replacement cybals for different needs etc. Creat a stage to set a mood and proper miking and maybe some lighting. Basically a stage setting. And lastly sa sound system to bag to songs. This would not really be a recoring studio... Does that seem feasible for to atract any customers? Suggestions? If it turned out where various musicians, apart from dummers, got interested, I could expand.

If it is going to be a band rehearsal space, you do not need a top of the line kit. Also, you may be better off having people supply their own cymbals.
 

veggo32

Silver Member
I'm looking for some feedback... I'm an intermediate drummer who is looking start a business where I would take out a small loan and rent a space where I would buy some top of the line drums, micking equipment and charge a small fee for drummers looking to jam. The reason I thought this may work is that I would love to have a place to go and play to recording or with other instumentatlists and jam. Of course I would have to do some marketing and surveys before I would engage in this type of venture. Can I get some feedback as to whether this would work or not?



That is like owning a motor bike rental shop and renting out brand new Harley's. I don't think that would be a wise business venture. Secondly, with the present economic conditions this venture is deemed to fail, without a doubt. Even in the best economic times it would be a risk. Do not take a loan out for this kind of venture...sorry to sound so negative but I've been in business for many years on my own and have a strong educational business background and this is something you do not want to take a loan out for, assuming that you would get a loan in the first place.
Again I apologize, but the truth of the matter is that there is no place for this type of business in a contracting economy.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Instead of taking out a loan to buy equipment, why not try and get a music store(s) to sponsor you by providing their equipment free in exchange for free advertising? That way, you don't have to buy equipment (1 less expense item) and the store(s) get good exposure/advertising on thier merchandise with the understanding that if a musician likes the instrument after actually playing and jamming with it, then they can buy it for a certain % off the retail price.

In theory, perhaps in the past, that may have worked. But things are particularly tough at retail right now, and while advertising and promotion are still key to attracting or retaining business, loaning (quality) gear isn't something the small stores can do, and GC and Sam Ash are also counting their pennies. It's also likely the drums and cymbals will be rendered unsellable later, so they'd basically be giving the gear away. Not much chance they'd find that very attractive under any circumstances.

There's also the matter of heads... stores and companies aren't going to give those away either. And don't forget the inevitable damage and theft to the gear.

All in all, this is an expensive proposition just in terms of the gear, nevermind renting the space, paying electricity & water, business permit/license, insurance, and at least one other employee so the owner can have a day off now and then.

In a good economy, it's a labor of love at best, not a money-maker. I'm with the poster above, this is not the time to embark on this kind of project.

Bermuda
 
B

Big_Philly

Guest
Instead of taking out a loan to buy equipment, why not try and get a music store(s) to sponsor you by providing their equipment free in exchange for free advertising? That way, you don't have to buy equipment (1 less expense item) and the store(s) get good exposure/advertising on thier merchandise with the understanding that if a musician likes the instrument after actually playing and jamming with it, then they can buy it for a certain % off the retail price.

Not to mention that some of the most badly abused kits that I have come across were in rehearsal studio's. There's a lot of incompetent drummers around that will bash a kit to pieces. Most music stores won't be too excited to let you use anything other than a cheap entry level kit, if they'll let you use it at all.
 

mrchattr

Gold Member
It is an interesting thought. Here is the problem, though:

MOST drummers have a kit that they can practice on for free. Even when I just had my Pearl Exports, I wouldn't have paid money just to go play a much better kit. I can't imagine most people would...maybe once, to try it and see the difference, but I don't see how you would get repeat customers. "Hmmm...I can pay this guy $10 a week to play his kit for a little while, or I can put $10 a week aside, and in 3 years have enough to buy my own kit that is as good as that one."

You have the same problem with teachers. If you want good, established teachers, then you are talking about guys who are already teaching, meaning that most likely, they have a place to teach. Why would they agree to give you a cut of their profits (which is how it usually works when a teacher teaches at a place...you don't pay them, they get paid by their students and then you get a small percentage of it, at least in my experience), when they can just keep doing their thing without paying you for it?

The people who would be mostly likely to use it regularly would be real amature guys who want to try out drumming, but don't know if they like it; real amature teachers who want to try teaching, but don't know if they like it; and joyriders who might want to try to use expensive gear once, but then would rather save to buy it than keep paying to play yours.

Also, two final thoughts: 1. What's the point of mic'ing the kit if you can't record there? I get that you are talking about turning it up, but honestly, if it's just a drummer in a place, you don't need it to be amplified. Everyone in there will have to worry about mixing, feedback problems, turning up or down, etc. This would also cause a real problem when you expanded to more than one kit at a time, sound-wise. 2. Allowing bands to practice there could get you in trouble, unless you spend a TON of cash to soundproof it, because even businesses have to follow local sound laws, and it sounds like you would be giving them the chance to play loud.

The rent, all utilities, soundproofing, the replacing of broken gear (I can't imagine even top of the line cymbals lasting long in the type of environment you are talking about), liability insurance, potential theft, salaries of any staff (I assume you're smart enough not to just let people be in there alone), and the problems I listed above, along with the down economy, make this seem like a really bad idea.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
OK...let me spin this around some. Does anyone have a advice about equipment and space? My thoughts were this...Rent space where drumming would not be a nuisence (obviously). Purchase a top of the line kit. Maybe a kit that would fit a wide variety of players. A standard cymbal set up with some replacement cybals for different needs etc. Creat a stage to set a mood and proper miking and maybe some lighting. Basically a stage setting. And lastly sa sound system to bag to songs. This would not really be a recoring studio... Does that seem feasible for to atract any customers? Suggestions? If it turned out where various musicians, apart from dummers, got interested, I could expand.

It's pretty common concept here in Los Angeles.

Although it's usually not just for drummers, it's place for full bands to rehearse. You rent a room by the hour, and it comes with a drum kit, amps, and a PA. All the band has to bring is their own guitars/bass and any keys; some places have cymbals, some do not.
It's convenient for bands who don't have their own space, because they don't have to spend a lot of time on set up and tear down, although as a drummer, the down side is the kit is usually fairly beat up after a while, dented heads, wing nuts wear out and get stripped from so many people adjusting heights, etc. Even a brand new kit can look pretty used after a few weeks of having dozens of different people use it every night. And thus gear is never top of line, although it's decent.

And some places have bigger rooms for bands to rent out for showcases (aka private shows for record labels, press, etc).
 

DestinationDrumming

Senior Member
As a soley commercial venture i agree with others.... this is not a good time to be starting out.
Have a look if there are any grants for community music projects. The main sources are commercial (big companies who use their grants to offset against their tax), Government, and altruistic individuals/organisations. You might be able to get funding for part of your venture if you have a community aspect to it.

Good luck
 

Lynchie

Member
Great replies..many things I didn't think of, i.e. drums getting abused and misused... I tend to view things as if I would be the customer. Thanks ALL! I'm still looking for a place to set up my drums...
 
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