Why All Drummers Need a 14x8 Snare...

And he's correct.
I got the 20-ply, PDP walnut/maple in this size and it quickly became my "do it all" snare. Rob is spot on about its tuning range and versatility. I have a 42 strand set under it & an Evans HD dry/300- head set up.
It's perfection.
 
I had a beautiful Gretsch USA 8x14 but I didn’t like it enough to keep, especially when my 6.5” Supra could get the same deep tone when you know what heads to use and how to tune it 😉.

Of course, if I was Mr. Session guy playing for people with specific requests, then sure I’d have one ready to go. I just realize what my limitations are and what I actually do, as opposed to what I want to do.
 
Phil Collins used both a 4" and a 8" snare extensively. He seems to use a deep snare (6.5 or 8) for his jazz big band. I used to think the fat thuddy backbeat of Heathaze was the deep one, but I don't think he had got the Gretsch back in 1980.
 
Ralph Peterson was a fan of the 8” depth. His Mapex signature snare is an 8. Personally I prefer the immediacy of the wire response on a shallower shell, but there’s no denying an 8 can do the job!
 
No wonder I look at new snares and there are plenty of deep 6 or 6.5 inch versions available for sale but the 5 or 5.5 inch ones are not available and need to be backordered. Looks like manufactures make more of these deep snares these days and they sell like hot cakes.
 
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Phil Collins used both a 4" and a 8" snare extensively. He seems to use a deep snare (6.5 or 8) for his jazz big band. I used to think the fat thuddy backbeat of Heathaze was the deep one, but I don't think he had got the Gretsch back in 1980.

I think Heathaze (and everything else from that time period) was his 6.5" Supersensitive. At least live that was the only snare he seemed to use from 1977 till 1981. Granted he often mixed things up in the studio. I think he still favored an acrylic snare drum in the studio from time to time, which could also do that fat splat sound from Heathaze really well...

The first time I think he used a 14x8" was on his Pearl kit from 1982, and then his subsequent snares were the 14x8" Gretsch and then 14x8" Noble & Cooley until finally getting that 14x3-7/8" Noble & Cooley.

Personally, I love 14x8" snares. I tune mine to the high side of medium so I can get a lot of body along with a lot of crack.
 
Already have a 10x12 tom..
: )
 
I used to have a 14x8 Corder snare, which was way cool. I used to tune it pretty high, but it still had lots of body due to the big shell. Peace and goodwill.
 
...Because "Beatdown" Brown says we need one! Trying out the new Yamaha Recording Custom Snares:

Finally some love for the 8-inch deep snares out there. Thanks to "Beatdown Brown" for another great video and setting the record straight.
 
Do not tell this to Ludwig. It looks like the majority of older iconic aluminum and brass snare recordings that made a name for them and their sound became a standard in the drumming world were done with 5 inch deep snares. I mean before Led Zeppelin.

Times have changed. Everyone digs deep snares and Piccolo snares are characterized as little dinosaurs belonging to 80s and 90s.
 
Man, that video's gonna sell a bunch of Recording Custom 14x8 snare drums, as well it should.

As for me, I have settled on a 14x7 Noble and Cooley and have long known that it's a magical, do-everything snare. If I had to take only one snare to a gig, I'd either take the N&C or a 6.5 Cherry Craviotto. Maybe one day I'll become a big boy and add an 8. We'll see.
 
I had a thing for 8 x 12 (tom convert) snares for a while..



Torodor4.jpg

20/12/16/12
thought it was the cats meow
cheap soft Torodor drums found for $50 and I breathed some life into;
turned the extra small tom into a snare

toro3.jpg
 
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