Who has the best most stable flat-base hardware…and GO!

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Looking for some solid flat-base hardware. I will need a boom stand as well. The cymbals I play are big, but they are thin. Thanks!
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
Looking for some solid flat-base hardware. I will need a boom stand as well. The cymbals I play are big, but they are thin.
Boom + flat base = unstable. Are you going for a look? Or just want some wobble on stage? I’m curious how this will end.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Boom + flat base = unstable. Are you going for a look? Or just want some wobble on stage? I’m curious how this will end.

I love the look of flat base hardware, and I like the idea of light weight too. I already have some DW 9000 stands, but I'd like something a little lighter.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
UPDATE: Y'all can continue with this discussion, but I think I'm just gonna go with the DW 3000 hardware. I'm just scared of flat base hardware given the sketchy surfaces I have to play on.
 

Neal Pert

Well-known Member
Best combination of lightweight and stability: Definitely Yamaha Crosstown
Best of the ultralight hardware: Definitely Tama
Sturdiest of the flat-based hardware; Probably the regular DW flat stuff-- not the ultralight.
 

C. Dave Run

Gold Member
UPDATE: Y'all can continue with this discussion, but I think I'm just gonna go with the DW 3000 hardware. I'm just scared of flat base hardware given the sketchy surfaces I have to play on.
Pearl flat based hardware allows for reversible tripods, so you can have both worlds. This includes the hi hat stand.
 

Iristone

Well-known Member
Jinbao. You can even hang toms on them.
Unfortunately, the stability will come with a heavier weight than most other flat-based options.

EDIT: unfortunately they don't seem to export them at the moment. Jinbao dealers are notoriously difficult to find and order (especially high-end products) from even within China, so international dealers might delay even more. Once they hit the international market, you could search for model number B2219.
 
Last edited:

Ryan Culberson

Well-known Member
UPDATE: Y'all can continue with this discussion, but I think I'm just gonna go with the DW 3000 hardware. I'm just scared of flat base hardware given the sketchy surfaces I have to play on.

Recently went with 3000 hardware (+ 5000 hi-hat stand and pedal) myself, for the exact reason you did. I play too many janky places with uneven surfaces to worry about flat-based stands ever again. The Crosstown stuff was cool and the uber-light weight was certainly amazing... I just couldn't get with the looks.
 

Drum Mer

Platinum Member
I compared the DW Ultralite and the Yamaha Crosstown series, but the Ultralite’s lacked quite a lot quility feel for me.

The looks of the Crosstown series are not really visible on stage anyway, but come with all the things you want from light, yet rock solid hardware.

Here they are on a small stage with a small bass drum:
9C025244-B208-40C3-B9D9-5F0687F2DB91.jpeg

I wonder if aluminium could be chrome plated.

Maybe Yamaha could add that in a next run.
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
I wonder if aluminium could be chrome plated.
No, but it can be anodized many different colors.

color-anodizing-01.jpg
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
It can also be polished to a mirror finish.

I like the anodized idea. Colored stands might be pretty cool.
The upside: anodizing slightly strengthens the metal (one of the reasons aluminum bicycle rims are anodized).
The downside: scratches will show, especially if it’s a dark color (e.g., black).
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Update 3:

I A/B'ed a 3000 and a 9000 stand last night, and there's not a lot of difference between the two due to the 3000 stand update in 2020. The 9000 is only the slightest bit heavier, but there's not a ton of difference. They appear very sturdy, and I'm glad I got them.
 

gish

Senior Member
Update 3:

I A/B'ed a 3000 and a 9000 stand last night, and there's not a lot of difference between the two due to the 3000 stand update in 2020. The 9000 is only the slightest bit heavier, but there's not a ton of difference. They appear very sturdy, and I'm glad I got them.
So, you stated you wanted lighter hardware but ended up with stands almost as heavy as what you already had? I’m confused, but enjoy your new gear!
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
So, you stated you wanted lighter hardware but ended up with stands almost as heavy as what you already had? I’m confused, but enjoy your new gear!

I would love lightweight hardware. However, I have come to the conclusion that a) my cymbals are just too big, and b) I play way too many gigs that don’t provide a nice flat surface to set up on. Also, wind isn’t my friend either. My big cymbals act like a sail. Do I want heavy hardware? Nope. Do I NEED heavy hardware? Sure do…for now at least.

I’ve gone back and forth on flat base hardware for years now, and I just don’t think it’s for me right now.
 

heartbeat

Active Member
I play a lot of outdoor rock gigs and have toured, all using the Gibraltar flat-based straight cymbal stands. Never a problem. The legs can fold up a bit to be more tripod-like. And I've used the lightweight Canopus tripod hi-hat stand with them. No issues.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I've owned all the new flat-based stuff: DW, Ludwig, Pearl....even some of the old original Slingerland stuff I had as a kid in the 70s...and NONE of them are as stable as a good tripod. I know the OP went with something else, but I'll cast my vote for the Crosstown stuff. I've been gigging my Crosstowns pretty hard for the last couple of years and they continue to hold up. Of course, I don't need boom stands, so I'm using them as they're designed, and they're awesome. A 20 pound bag carrying two cymbals stands, snare stand, hi hat and a pedal? I'm all over that. When I was in my 20s-30s, heavy hardware didn't seem to phase me, but now it does in my 50s. And since most of my gigs involve being outside in the wind, flat-based hardware is just a recipe for disaster, I think.

EDIT - The tripod leg option of the Pearl stands doesn't really count to me. I don't think the legs spread out far enough when in the tripod position, so I'd still be afraid to leave them alone on a windy stage.
 
Top