The Hang

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I'm in full costume so I hang a snare drum around my neck with a guitar strap and go out on the street in front of the venue trying to drum up business.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
I normally do my warm-up exercises. I'm not much for socializing with anyone, so I don't have any exciting or fun stories to share.
Same here. I need that pre-gig warm up time to get my hands & mind right so I can give the best performance I can. Neil Peart once said, "You don't become a professional player without learning to play professionally." It's something I live by at shows I'm hired for.
I don't actively seek social situations...

I am not into small talk with people who are in "altered states", so I avoid that as much as possible at clubs
I've had WAY too many "altered state" people try to engage me at shows. Either they want to give me their life story from DNA up until that evening, or they want to hop on the kit & show me what they used to do "back in the day".

I have 0 tolerance for that & try my best to just be hidden away. As a hired gun, I let the lead vocal or guitarist do the networking.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
I've had WAY too many "altered state" people try to engage me at shows. Either they want to give me their life story from DNA up until that evening, or they want to hop on the kit & show me what they used to do "back in the day".

I have 0 tolerance for that & try my best to just be hidden away. As a hired gun, I let the lead vocal or guitarist do the networking.

I hear a lot of you guys talking about people wanting to actually play your kits when they are set up at gigs...like a rando from the crowd

I don't think that has ever happened to me, on drums or bass. I can't believe that people would have the nerve to do that
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
I hear a lot of you guys talking about people wanting to actually play your kits when they are set up at gigs...like a rando from the crowd

I don't think that has ever happened to me, on drums or bass. I can't believe that people would have the nerve to do that
Oh, you have no idea. Just last month in a small town, outside show at a cafe, I had a guy ask if he could sit behind it. I politely declined & he went & did it anyway.
When I told him, "Sir...no meant no! Could to please leave?" he didn't understand why I would be upset. Then he proceeded to tell me how much money he made playing music "in his day" and how "youngsters like me don't know the struggle!!"
I'm 52, so I took the youngster comment as a compliment. :LOL:
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
Oh, you have no idea. Just last month in a small town, outside show at a cafe, I had a guy ask if he could sit behind it. I politely declined & he went & did it anyway.
When I told him, "Sir...no meant no! Could to please leave?" he didn't understand why I would be upset. Then he proceeded to tell me how much money he made playing music "in his day" and how "youngsters like me don't know the struggle!!"
I'm 52, so I took the youngster comment as a compliment. :LOL:

man, I don't think I could keep my cool if he did it anyway...

and I have definitely had "arm chair drummers/bassists" tell me how they did things better than me, and this used to really get me riled up in my 20's, but age and wisdom has me now just smiling and nodding whenever that happens

I did actually have a resident at an old folks home ask if he could see my old Luddy's.. Said it brought back memories of his youth playing .I actually asked him if he wanted to play or a second. He was surprised, but got back there and had a little fun..

the manager called us later on to say that it was all he talked about for the next week
 

ottog1979

Senior Member
I don't think that has ever happened to me, on drums or bass. I can't believe that people would have the nerve to do that
They do. Not super often but it happens. This year, had a "kid" walk up on stage, sit down at my kit and grab sticks just after we finished for the night. No asking, no coversation, nothing. I caught him in time and delivered a pretty firm "NO WAY". Last year, when setting up & sound checking had a drunken bar heckler who wouldn't shut up about giving me $20, then $40, then $100 to sit down and play drums. People get inspired (a good thing), but overly so I guess and wrong place & time.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
I did actually have a resident at an old folks home ask if he could see my old Luddy's.. Said it brought back memories of his youth playing .I actually asked him if he wanted to play or a second. He was surprised, but got back there and had a little fun..

the manager called us later on to say that it was all he talked about for the next week
Now, see...this I'd be ok with because clearly he wasn't about to go all Buddy Rich on your drums. He just wanted to relive his youth for a moment. I' sure when I'm close to 80, I'll be doing somewhat the same thing too. ❤️
 

ottog1979

Senior Member
On the flip side here's a fun fan thing I do that always feels GOOD. I keep all my well-worn sticks that I've retired from play/practice. Always have a pair or two in my stick bag at gigs. I give these away to kids or other deserving interested party while we're setting up, sound-checking or between sets. It always goes over really well with the kids and their parents.
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
On the flip side here's a fun fan thing I do that always feels GOOD. I keep all my well-worn sticks that I've retired from play/practice. Always have a pair or two in my stick bag at gigs. I give these away to kids or other deserving interested party while we're setting up, sound-checking or between sets. It always goes over really well with the kids and their parents.
I had one lady ask me after a gig if I would show her my "stick".

If only she'd been attractive 😐
 

BobC

Member
When I get to the gig, haul everything in and set up, I really don't want anyone socializing with me. As band members, we make small talk, but I try to keep audience members at a distance, because I have to stay focused on getting the kit set up correctly, positioning everything and tuning. If someone from the crowd wants to chat, I politely tell him I have to concentrate on my job at the moment, but always say I'll catch up with you later after the first set. I usually try to do that as a courtesy. If it's another drummer or musician who wants to talk gear, I like doing that.

I did a gig in a funky bar in Shohola, PA one night, and some guy who was half in his cups at the bar came over to talk. He meant well, but he turned out to be a real PITA. I was very patient, but the guy wouldn't go away, even after I told him I needed to focus on my work. He finally walked back to the bar, but came back five minutes later and started talking again, finally asking me if I wanted a drink. I generally don't drink on gigs, thanked him, and politely refused. His response was, "Whatsa' matter? You reformed?" That was it. I finally said, "Listen dude, I appreciate the offer, but no, I'm not a reformed drinker. I just don't drink on gigs because I need to be 100% in tune with the music, and I really need to concentrate on doing my job here right now, OK?"

On break, or after the gig, I'm happy to chat with almost anyone, but not during "work time."
 
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Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Two distinctly different pre gig hang contexts for me;

Festivals: Depending on the lineup, I’ll arrive early to watch some acts, or turn up just in time to start pre setup. I’ll locate the setup area, get my gear to a point of rapid carry on, then go grab a drink to take on stage. Maybe some band chat if there’s a short wait, but I’m usually quickly on to stage.

Live music clubs: They’re always an early arrival with setup & sound check before doors. There then follows a typical 2+ hours before stage time, so the band usually bails to a nearby restaurant for a chill meal before heading back to the venue.
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
Most of y’all are posting stories with band mates who are on time and don’t get buzzed before/during gigs. Impressive!

The whole “band hang” gets turned on its head when it’s a worship band at church. In my 20+ year tenure as a church drummer, there was a hang backstage and it was survivable, but no one ever spoke about what’s on their mind like members of a bar band at Denny’s or Steak ‘n Shake after a gig. It’s weird. I’ve experienced more/better bonding in bar bands than any church band. And I’ve seen church musicians go off on people in ways that would never be acceptable in a bar band.
 
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