Ian Paice

JayDVee009

Junior Member
dawg said:
jay was that snaremaster or staremaster,stairmaster or....uh,never mind![/QUOTE

No I don't mind at all dawg! In fact it's an excellent question! I believe he invented some of his most complex music whilst playing the snare on the actual stairmaster after walking a flight of stairs with his snare........ therefore... Snaremaster. Can anyone else corroborate this? Oh ok.
 

Oleandrums

Junior Member
When I was growing up and learning drums, if someone asked what influences I had, I'd always respond with many of the greats for the day - Bruford, Palmer, Bonham, Moon, etc - but for some reason Ian Paice never got mentioned, even though every time I heard him, his playing just blew me away. I wish I would have paid more attention to him back then - one of the greats, no doubt...
 

Anchein Vouivra

Pioneer Member

JayDVee009

Junior Member
Anchein Vouivra said:
Yeah I have this show on video tape at home. It's called Scandinavian Nights, great show but terrible sound quality. It's a pity there's not more live shows video archive in this glory time of Deep Purple.
Ian Paice playing has some hypnotizing power energy!!

You can get the Scandinavian Nights concert on cd and the quality should be much better than the version you have on video. And there's some great new dvd's of Purple featuring live performances from 1970, 71, 72 and 73.
 

crumbdrums

Senior Member
What I admire most about his playing is how freakin' clean it is. He NEVER sounds like he's trying and it all fits the songs great.
 

bonzolead

Platinum Member
he is one of my favorite drummers totally underrated him and Bonham correct me if i'm wrong came from the same part of England there must be something in the water overthere
i've seen Deep Purple several times but the best time I saw them was about ten years ago and my friends and I sat behind the stage for about 8 songs until the management showed up seeing Ian work his magic from behind the kit is one of my coolest memories.
never a ok show always incredible.too bad Jon Lord doesn't. tour with them anymore he'll always be my favorite Rock keyboardest.But thats another thread altogether.

Keep Swatting IAN

Bonzolead
 

Mook

Senior Member
I'm currently playing in a Deep Purple tribute band & am a massive fan of Ian Paice!

One song not mentioned so far is 'Lay down stay down' from the Burn album, it's the most difficult of the tunes I've had to learn as yet (including Burn, Fireball, Lazy etc), the fills under the verses are almost all different & extremely well played by Ian & I toyed with the idea of refusing to play it for the 1st week or so of rehearsals. The Groove on 'You Fool No one' from that LP is also woth mentioning.
 

Peter W.

Member
JamStew said:
Ian's work in You Fool No One is great! The way he uses the bell and even the stopped crash, amazing. Then the base drum pattern in Fireball (WITHOUT a double bass pedal!) is the whole insanity! And then his awesome solo in The Mule. Just listen and enjoy it! I find no words to describe it!

All in all Ian Paice is one of the greatest hard rock drummer ever. He has got such a great timing and feeling (his shuffle feeling is AWESOME!) like only a few other drummers have.
Ian Paice is one of my largest influences (beside Neil Peart, John Bonham and Rodney Holmes). He's the ultimte mixing of speed, accuracy and feeling.


I'm a HUGE Ian Paice fan. But... "Fireball" is played with two bassdrums: If you get the video "Scandinavien Nights" from 1972, they do "Fireball" as an extra, an they simply bring in a second bassdrum on stage, for just that particular song! It still rocks though...

The thing i really love about him is:

(01) He has a feeling (that swing feel!) that makes him recognizable when you hear it...
(02) He has a sound that is recognizable when you hear it...
(03) His solos are so musical, almost melodic... I think the solo on "Made in Japan" is HIS best ever recorded solo... I don't know if it's because I grew up with that solo, but I still think it's one of the greatest solos ever...
 

onemat

Senior Member
Zardoz said:
I usually listen to everything, but when a classic rock band like Deep Purple comes on I'll shun it off, thinking "Eh.......smoke on the water.......corny.

Corny? It never struck me a corny. It's a song that tells a story of an incident that really happened. There was a venue in Europe, was it Amsterdam? I don't remember, but the venue was actually burned to the ground after "some stupid" idiot shot off a flare gun in the middle of a concert..I believe it was the Mothers Of Invention. The band helped get people out of there but lost all their equipment. If I have the story right Deep Purple provided the Mothers with gear so they could continue their tour. Do I have this right or was it Deep Purple who lost the gear and the Mothers who helped? Musically I find the best way to enjoy the song is to listen to what Paice is doing.
Somebody tell the story correctly please.
Matt
 

intooder

Senior Member
onemat said:
Corny? It never struck me a corny. It's a song that tells a story of an incident that really happened. There was a venue in Europe, was it Amsterdam? I don't remember, but the venue was actually burned to the ground after "some stupid" idiot shot off a flare gun in the middle of a concert..I believe it was the Mothers Of Invention. The band helped get people out of there but lost all their equipment. If I have the story right Deep Purple provided the Mothers with gear so they could continue their tour. Do I have this right or was it Deep Purple who lost the gear and the Mothers who helped? Musically I find the best way to enjoy the song is to listen to what Paice is doing.
Somebody tell the story correctly please.
Matt
"We all came out to montreux
On the lake geneva shoreline
To make records with a mobile
We didnt have much time"
They're referring to when they were setting up to record an album on the Stones' Mobile Studio in Montreux, Switzerland. Bernhard might be able to provide more details on this ;)
 

Pywacket

Member
As a huge Ian Paice fan since the release of In Rock I finally had the immense pleasure of playing the Swedish rock festival in 99 on the Purple bill and, for the first time, seeing him play live from 10 feet away. I felt like a sixteen year old fan again and even got a pair of autographed sticks from him. I'm not easily impressed but that was 90 minutes I'll never forget.
 

Chrisroadstar

Junior Member
As a huge Ian Paice fan since the release of In Rock I finally had the immense pleasure of playing the Swedish rock festival in 99 on the Purple bill and, for the first time, seeing him play live from 10 feet away. I felt like a sixteen year old fan again and even got a pair of autographed sticks from him. I'm not easily impressed but that was 90 minutes I'll never forget.

Great:) i too had this pleasue recently. My band Roadstar Opened for Deep Purple last summer at the UKs Monsters of Rock festival..
i was lucky enough to hang out with Ian Paice for a while, hes one of the greats and also happens to be a very friendly guy:)
DSCF06542.jpg
 

Chrisroadstar

Junior Member
..on that subject, i couldnt resist shearing a few more pics with you from the day

ERIC SINGER..

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(thats Roadstar managers sons with Eric..)

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DSCF06552.jpg


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.me and my bass playin brother!...lol..
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AND FINALLY , ONE FROM ALICE HAHA!
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Johnny from the block

Senior Member
Great drummer from a great band. and an amazing technique.
i saw purple last year in Brussel and they still rock.
Btw his fills are always right, not too much, not too little and perfectly timed.

Paice has been a major influence to Lars Ulrich too you know.
 
W

wy yung

Guest
I really enjoyed reading this thread. I remember being a very young boy (about 35 years ago) and playing drums along to Deep Purple with pencils on a lounge chair. He was the first drummer I ever mimiced. I am so pleased to see that he is back in the public eye and that young drummers are discovering the beauty of his playing.

And a big thanks to Chrisroadstar for taking the time to share those great pic's.
 

JayDVee009

Junior Member
I'm currently playing in a Deep Purple tribute band & am a massive fan of Ian Paice!

One song not mentioned so far is 'Lay down stay down' from the Burn album, it's the most difficult of the tunes I've had to learn as yet (including Burn, Fireball, Lazy etc), the fills under the verses are almost all different & extremely well played by Ian & I toyed with the idea of refusing to play it for the 1st week or so of rehearsals. The Groove on 'You Fool No one' from that LP is also woth mentioning.

"You Fool No one" definitely has an awesome groove but the live versions are what you really want to hear! They're louder, heavier and faster....

There is a very cool version of "You Fool No one" on the California Jam DVD from 1974 in front of 200,000 people.

But a real treat is the live version from "Made in Europe" in 1975... It's a much better recording than the California Jam version and is so much clearer and the drums sound so powerful and hard... It's amazing!
 
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