Anyone sell stuff on Reverb?

Mastiff

Senior Member
I figured I'd sell off an old bass pedal I had... but every time I sell something on eBay or now Reverb, I wonder why I bother. I sold it for $140, free shipping. I figured I had to do free shipping because no buyer wants to see shipping on there, so I bumper up the price a bit. The pedal weighs about 6 pounds, and the cheapest shipping option was $36 (!). So I start at $140, deduct Reverb fees, shipping and an hour off work waiting in line at the post office, plus boxing the thing up. In the end it doesn't seem worth the trouble. I should have just given it away for $60 locally, or just left it sitting.

Am I missing something?

I just bought a starter guitar kit for my kid for $120 including guitar and amp, from Reverb. If I carried that stuff into the post office, they'd want $100 or more just to mail it. I don't know how people make enough to make it worth the trouble. What's the secret?
 

Mustion

Senior Member
Did you do flat rate shipping, or based on the weight & dimensions of the box?

For certain things it's not worth the trouble when you consider shipping (and your time) but sometimes CL just doesn't cut it.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
First, set up an account with the UPS or the Post office, where you can box the item and have them pick it up, no charge. You have to hjave an accurate scale to guesstimate the weight and be able to measue the "cube" of the box for shipping rates. That will save you an hour in line at the Post Office. Sell it on Craigslist to locals, for pick up only, cash only, and kill two birds with one stone. I have bought and sold on Craigslist many times and it is well worth the effort. You can also use Marketplace on Facebook, for local sales. I have used that as well.
 

Mastiff

Senior Member
I always look at the flat rate boxes, but I swear they are scientifically optimized to not fit any normal objects inside them. A bass drum pedal won't fit any of them.

Regarding Craigslist, I should have used it in this case (hindsight) and I have for lots of other stuff, like old furniture. More unusual stuff is often hard to sell in Tucson, since the market is not very big.
 

Rochelle Rochelle

Senior Member
I've sold stuff on Reverb and eBay and yes it can be frustrating to figure out how to price the item with shipping so you make at least some money. I also try locally first using Facebook Marketplace.
 

moxman

Silver Member
I never use eBay or Reverb (although Reverb is good for seeing going rates and a wide selection of stuff).
Google Kijiji is awesome - I've bought and sold so much stuff from there it's ridiculous. Great deals, no tax, no shipping.. someone shows up at your door takes away your junk and hands you cash. I use it primarily for buying/selling drums stuff and furniture.. no one will try to scam you for a couch or drums!
Anything like high priced electronics - meet in a mall or coffee shop.. and never accept e-transfers - cash only!
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
I figured I'd sell off an old bass pedal I had... but every time I sell something on eBay or now Reverb, I wonder why I bother. I sold it for $140, free shipping. I figured I had to do free shipping because no buyer wants to see shipping on there, so I bumper up the price a bit. The pedal weighs about 6 pounds, and the cheapest shipping option was $36 (!). So I start at $140, deduct Reverb fees, shipping and an hour off work waiting in line at the post office, plus boxing the thing up. In the end it doesn't seem worth the trouble. I should have just given it away for $60 locally, or just left it sitting.

Am I missing something?

I just bought a starter guitar kit for my kid for $120 including guitar and amp, from Reverb. If I carried that stuff into the post office, they'd want $100 or more just to mail it. I don't know how people make enough to make it worth the trouble. What's the secret?
I've really had nothing but good experiences with Reverb - selling and buying.

For shipping - I'd always go our local "Zip and Ship" kind of place and get an idea of how it would cost then factor that into the price - however it always costs more than I anticipate haha.

I sold a 6 piece drum set and totally ate it on shipping - but that was my fault for not researching how much it cost before hand.

I prefer local - but I live in nowhere NM so finding someone who wants high end gear here is rarely.

I do live a couple hours away from a much larger city though and I've found that a decent inbetween is posting stuff there and meeting people like halfway - that's worked a couple times.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
Nearly ALL musical equipment is just, dang heavy. That is the majority of the basis for shipping costs. I second most of what people here are saying--sell locally to the best of your ability. PEOPLE LOVE PICTURES! So when you post on CList and Facebook, many good pics will help. Same with the online selling venues.

You simply cannot get around the size and weight of what we sell. No shortcuts.
 

EricT43

Senior Member
I prefer Reverb to Craigslist, honestly. With Craigslist I either get no response, or ridiculously low offers, or people with no money wanting to trade for stuff I don't want. Reverb is a very active marketplace, and most buyers understand the value of what is being bought and sold there. I recently sold 3 cymbals and 2 sets of hi-hats via Reverb in about a week. It was very smooth. I buy most of my cymbals online, and I save the boxes for when I need to sell something. I buy the shipping label through Reverb and drop the package off at local postal services store. Between the Reverb selling fees, bump fees, and payment processing fees, it costs me about 10%, but I consider it to be worth the convenience.

I lost money on shipping the first few times, but with some experience I've gotten better at estimating the cost. The Reverb shipping cost estimator always guesses low. I wish they had an option to just pass through the actual shipping costs to the customer so that we as sellers don't have to gamble on it.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I've not mailed off a piece of music gear in probably 15 years.

In regards to your question, a friend of mine does business via craigslist. I think he usually doesn't sell anything larger than a 12" or 13" rack tom. He does a flat shipping rate. Sometimes he makes money; sometimes he loses a little bit. In any case, he doesn't do anything too large or heavy.

Anything large, I just put it on CL or Facebook Marketplace. If it doesn't sell there, I just keep posting it.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
I prefer Reverb to Craigslist, honestly. With Craigslist I either get no response, or ridiculously low offers, or people with no money wanting to trade for stuff I don't want. Reverb is a very active marketplace, and most buyers understand the value of what is being bought and sold there. I recently sold 3 cymbals and 2 sets of hi-hats via Reverb in about a week. It was very smooth. I buy most of my cymbals online, and I save the boxes for when I need to sell something. I buy the shipping label through Reverb and drop the package off at local postal services store. Between the Reverb selling fees, bump fees, and payment processing fees, it costs me about 10%, but I consider it to be worth the convenience.
I find that cymbals are the most reasonable drum-related thing to sell when it comes to how much they fetch used, and how much they cost to ship. Other than small vintage things or whatever, everything else is kind of impractical.
 

Macarina

Silver Member
I’ve just started using Reverb and am rather happy with it. Despite some of the issues mentioned here.
I have no desire to use CL. I just don’t want folks coming to my house.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I’ve just started using Reverb and am rather happy with it. Despite some of the issues mentioned here.
I have no desire to use CL. I just don’t want folks coming to my house.
As long as they don’t seem sketchy when I’m messaging them, then I have no problem letting them come to my house. The kinds of people you don’t want coming to your house usually have a ton of red flags when you’re dealing with them, from the very beginning. That’s just my personal observation.
 

Macarina

Silver Member
As long as they don’t seem sketchy when I’m messaging them, then I have no problem letting them come to my house. The kinds of people you don’t want coming to your house usually have a ton of red flags when you’re dealing with them, from the very beginning. That’s just my personal observation.
What are your red flags? These drummer forums are the only social sites I interact with.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
What are your red flags? These drummer forums are the only social sites I interact with.
Wanting to come to my house is a red flag. So is wanting me to come to yours. I suggest the police station to meet. Anyone trying to rip you off won't want to meet you there. Anyone honest will feel better about the meeting if it's at a police station. Safety first.
 
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