64.8 Hz resonant hum, help me kill it

Arkansmay

Active Member
Floor tom top. Honestly the resonance is not bad, its a good tone, just loud and steady in the mix, I will lower the overheads. The toms aren't individually mic'd. Im not trying to do a lot of processing or dampening.
 
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Stroman

Platinum Member
So I'm all proud of my freshly tuned drums sounding so sweet and I'm doing test takes in my DAW and everything is thumbs up except for the pervasive hum that just takes over everything. I didn't want to put any kind of muffling on my floor tom but four Moon gels is not enough to stop it. It would need something as heavy as a wallet. That kills the drum sound that I'm after. My question I guess really is should I change the tuning of the bass drum or the floor tom? Because it's the bass drum that's causing it. Never mind the 12-in rack Tom....
Carefully applied gates? That's what worked for me to kill the floor tom hum when close-mic'd live.
 
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JimmyM

Platinum Member
Floor tom top. Honestly the resonance is not bad, its a good tone, just loud and steady in the mix, I will lower the overheads. The toms aren't individually mic'd. Im not trying to do a lot of processing or dampening.
Better get over that. I would never agonize over it when I can do quick cheap fixes. All is fair in love, war and recording ;).
 

Fred D

Pioneer Member
Use a low cut filter set at 70HZ and adjust from there, Try to isolate which mic/s is picking it up and apply the filter to it/them
 

dcrigger

Senior Member
IMO forget the mics and possible processing - and just listen to it sitting at the drums.... if it is noticeable or bothersome from right there at the kit.... then I would say, fix it, right there at the drum. Because if I can hear it being a negative from the throne - then most every other mic on the kit is picking up at well.... and I can't gate everything :)

But even if I'm gating the toms - I still want them all too ring out similarly... Not half one sticking out with some troublesome tone. But rather have them all ring out the same.... thus when the gate "shortens" the length of each tom's note, the ungated after ring (which will still be heard by the other mics - overheads, room mics, etc) will sound nice and balanced between the toms.

So while I get the desire to not over-dampen - but IMO there has to be priorities... and not having some ugly tone ringing out would always be my priority.... and if I can't tune it out, then I will dampen to pretty what ever degree it takes. And generally if I have to dampen too much, then it is probably a tuning issue anyway.

But Morrisman probably nailed the solution - dampen the reso a bit. Though I would never use his methods - anything internal for me is just a full stop no.... I would just take about a 3" strip of gaff tape - form a sticky side out loop with it - and place it near the rim on the reso. Why I love the gaff loop.... the loop part gives the semblance of mass for efficient muffling, while the sticky provides near infinite ability to re-position. Which for something like this I find essential - because might have to try 3-4 different position before I find the placement that centers in on that hum.

Anyway - after minimizing it the best you can - at the drum - then turn back to the mics and processing. It's just always better to use processing to enhance - not to fix problems (that shouldn't be there in the first place)

Good luck....
 

Chris Whitten

Silver Member
Toms resonating is normal. As per David above, experiment with tuning and dampen a little to taste.
I do mic my toms. I routinely use automation to lower the volume of my toms mics when they are not playing. Much softer slope and more sympathetic than gates. I don't often take the toms out completely, as tom mics can add nicely to the sound of the kit overall.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
IMO forget the mics and possible processing - and just listen to it sitting at the drums.... if it is noticeable or bothersome from right there at the kit.... then I would say, fix it, right there at the drum. Because if I can hear it being a negative from the throne - then most every other mic on the kit is picking up at well.... and I can't gate everything :)

But even if I'm gating the toms - I still want them all too ring out similarly... Not half one sticking out with some troublesome tone. But rather have them all ring out the same.... thus when the gate "shortens" the length of each tom's note, the ungated after ring (which will still be heard by the other mics - overheads, room mics, etc) will sound nice and balanced between the toms.

So while I get the desire to not over-dampen - but IMO there has to be priorities... and not having some ugly tone ringing out would always be my priority.... and if I can't tune it out, then I will dampen to pretty what ever degree it takes. And generally if I have to dampen too much, then it is probably a tuning issue anyway.

But Morrisman probably nailed the solution - dampen the reso a bit. Though I would never use his methods - anything internal for me is just a full stop no.... I would just take about a 3" strip of gaff tape - form a sticky side out loop with it - and place it near the rim on the reso. Why I love the gaff loop.... the loop part gives the semblance of mass for efficient muffling, while the sticky provides near infinite ability to re-position. Which for something like this I find essential - because might have to try 3-4 different position before I find the placement that centers in on that hum.

Anyway - after minimizing it the best you can - at the drum - then turn back to the mics and processing. It's just always better to use processing to enhance - not to fix problems (that shouldn't be there in the first place)

Good luck....

Gotta admit, I like this solution
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Snareweight M80 on the batter. Gets rid of ring but you still get the "note" out of the drum.

I swear, those guys should start paying me as much advertising as I do for them.
 
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