Speaker SPL for Drums?

yammyfan

Senior Member
I wouldn't put too much (or any) emphasis on SPL and watts. You need a system that drives BIG speakers because you need to move a lot of air to compete with an acoustic drum kit. Think: jet engine loud. You want 110-130 decibels and that takes power.

Those smallish RCA and Sharp receivers won't have the balls to drive big speakers. Their amps are too weak and when they're driven hard they clip and either 1) sound distorted or 2) destroy speakers (tweeters mostly) or 3) both.

You won't be able to find a system that's too big or loud - only one that's too small.

Your best bet is to find a former top-of-the-line receiver with lots of power and pair it up with a large pair of speakers. Woofers should not be smaller than 10" and 12" should realistically be the minimum. Two 6" woofers does not equal a 12". Speakers should have 92 decibels efficiency as a starting point.

You could also use a pair of professional grade passive PA speakers (Yamaha perhaps) and pair them up with a powerful PA mixer/amp combo. I recommend an amp that pushes at least 100 watts per side into 8 Ohms whether you're going with a receiver, an amp or a PA system. 100 watts into 8 Ohms - not 4 Ohms or 6 Ohms - is your baseline.

Cheers!
 
I figured out that 2 Abramtech E500 Speakers Together would Produce 110.5db at Full Volume. I would think that would be enough. I don't need to go much over 100db I would think because of Hearing Loss. Read that 2 Hours is the Max per Day at 100db of Sound. After the 2 hours Permanent Hearing Loss is Caused. I would really like to know the SPL of my Old Sharp System.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I just checked and my system hit 92 dB at the volume I normally practice at so 110 should allow plenty of headroom. (y)
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I have this issue, it sucks donkey balls. You do not want tinnitus. When it flares up, I get angry and frustrated at not being able to hold a simple conversation because I can't hear voices as they tend to be in the same frequency range.
Protect your hearing at all costs, it can't be fixed later.
+100%

Mine affects overall volume. I cant hear anything quiet. My wife can watch the tv with the volume at like 12. I need it at like 35. The ringing never really goes away, it just has loud days and quiet days. I say "What?" a lot.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
+100%

Mine affects overall volume. I cant hear anything quiet. My wife can watch the tv with the volume at like 12. I need it at like 35. The ringing never really goes away, it just has loud days and quiet days. I say "What?" a lot.
Ditto - minus the wife part. :) My tinnitus is so loud that it obscures cymbals in recorded music. I have to crank up the volume in order to hear them. What's worse - my high frequency hearing in my right ear is much worse than in the left.

I wear hearing protection when practicing because I can still hear high frequency material, I just have to turn up the volume a little. I want to protect the hearing that I still have.
 

corbinrozmus

New Member
I want to start playing drums, and I am interested in this question; I will play in a basement with good acoustics. My father said that the best thing I need is to take good headphones and play electronic drums in them so that I can hear the sound in the headphones and not disturb anyone around. I have good speakers that I can use, but they have recently started making noise. I have already tried a couple of ways that I found in the article https://www.thehifiguide.com/stop-speakers-buzzing/, but I think I've only made it worse. Does anyone know what else could be the reason?
 
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doggyd69b

Silver Member
I wouldn't put too much (or any) emphasis on SPL and watts. You need a system that drives BIG speakers because you need to move a lot of air to compete with an acoustic drum kit. Think: jet engine loud. You want 110-130 decibels and that takes power.

Those smallish RCA and Sharp receivers won't have the balls to drive big speakers. Their amps are too weak and when they're driven hard they clip and either 1) sound distorted or 2) destroy speakers (tweeters mostly) or 3) both.

You won't be able to find a system that's too big or loud - only one that's too small.

Your best bet is to find a former top-of-the-line receiver with lots of power and pair it up with a large pair of speakers. Woofers should not be smaller than 10" and 12" should realistically be the minimum. Two 6" woofers does not equal a 12". Speakers should have 92 decibels efficiency as a starting point.

You could also use a pair of professional grade passive PA speakers (Yamaha perhaps) and pair them up with a powerful PA mixer/amp combo. I recommend an amp that pushes at least 100 watts per side into 8 Ohms whether you're going with a receiver, an amp or a PA system. 100 watts into 8 Ohms - not 4 Ohms or 6 Ohms - is your baseline.

Cheers!
Something like this should work: https://www.amazon.com/JBL-Professi...eywords=powered+speaker&qid=1649862248&sr=8-7
I know it's not cheap, but if you are going to buy a receiver, plus speakers and still be barely there to compete with drums...
One thing that has not been mentioned is what part the room is playing in all this? is it treated or just acts like a giant speaker box? treating the room will not only lower the volume of the drums somewhat, it will also help some not so powerful speakers to be able to keep up. If you decide to go the powered speaker route, I recommend 15 inch speakers minimum, they can be driven quite hard and still have a very decent response, of course the perfect solution would be one of those plus an 18 inch powered bass speaker such as this for example: https://www.amazon.com/Rockville-RBG12S-Active-Powered-Subwoofer/dp/B00SKFNVNK/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=1ZYEXUOXK25PM&keywords=dj+bass+speakers+18+inch+subwoofer+powered&qid=1649862559&sprefix=powered++bass+speaker+18,aps,788&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzOFpMUE0wQzhTUzdBJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwNTczODQ3M0lPUTRINkFWWlE3TyZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwOTczOTY5MTlDMjM2TFI3T1RQSiZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX2F0ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU= Maybe even better just to get a mixer and a cheap drum mic kit and mic the kit, use headphones and be able to control the volume not to mention that you can also record it.... The Zoom mixer is $1000 (zoom livetrack l-20) but there are other cheaper (albeit less inputs) out there. Mic kits start at around $75 and can go all the way up to $3000 for the Earthworks. maybe too much ( a lot of people are not interested in recording) but options are there. Also you can just get this: https://www.amazon.com/Behringer-U-...qid=1649863033&sprefix=behrin,aps,223&sr=8-10
enough inputs to cover a 5 piece kit plus you can expand it should you need more inputs later.. Lots of choices..
 
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Steve30907

Active Member
I want to start playing drums and I am also interested in this question, I will play in the basement with good acoustics
Gk Ultra phones and phone or a small mixer or headphone amp. I wouldn't recommend going the pa route unless you really want to. You play out with other people they start expecting you to haul that stuff around and setup it gets old quick. With the isolation from the ultra phones you can keep music low volume and still hear the kit without mics much better than cranking volume to hear music over a speaker.
 
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