hands getting beat up

Boomka

Platinum Member
I've been playing for 9 years but I don't practice technique much. I've always just wanted to PLAY, and that generally works for me.
This approach has brought you "blisters, sore fingers, a broken knuckle..."

If that's "generally work(ing) for you" then carry on with your method. If not, seek another.

I'm game for some simple techniques I can be mindful of if you have any specific links.
Having good technique is quite simple. There is, however, a long and sometimes difficult road to obtain it. A couple of "links" aren't what you need. Get professional help.

I'm not opposed to "practice" practice as long as it's something I can work into my increasingly rare opportunities to play at home outside of band practice.
So, you're not opposed to doing the necessary work to improve your technique as long as you don't really have to put much time or effort into it.

Enjoy your blisters, sore fingers and broken knuckles.
 

Mic T

Junior Member
I had the same problem when I first started playing years ago. I'd get blisters and break alot of sticks. The sticks I used were large too, which doesn't help.

In my opinion, you can alleviate this problem by holding the sticks more loosely in your hands, using your wrists for power rather than your forearms.
You might lose a few sticks at first while you're playing. Just have some extras nearby and hope you don't nail your guitar player too badly in the process.
 

newoldie

Silver Member
You might want to consider lightly coating the sticks with Zildjian cymbal wax or a similar product. If you use this when you first start warming up, the grip will be easier on your hands and the friction that's sometimes caused by the stick moving around will be more comfortably eased as the pressure you need is less to control the sticks.
John Riley suggests this on his "Master Drummer" DVD.
I've used the wax from time to time and keep it in my gig bag.
Its very light w/no smell, easy to wash off but a good product to improve your initial grip without needing so much pressure on the sticks.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CI0rSX7Jg-I

It's hard to master but it's rewarding. I used to play hard rock it made it so easy and way less tiring.

Technique really opens doors and unlocks your full potential. If you're holding on too tight you're going to wreck your arms not just your hands.

Carpal tunnel and tendonitis to name just a couple. A friend of mine retired after he got dystonia in his right arm and couldn't grip a stick after 15mins so it's really important to take care of your self.

I'm against any kind of grip on a drumstick, friction slows you down and gives you blisters!
 

Patz

Senior Member
This approach has brought you "blisters, sore fingers, a broken knuckle..."

If that's "generally work(ing) for you" then carry on with your method. If not, seek another.



Having good technique is quite simple. There is, however, a long and sometimes difficult road to obtain it. A couple of "links" aren't what you need. Get professional help.



So, you're not opposed to doing the necessary work to improve your technique as long as you don't really have to put much time or effort into it.

Enjoy your blisters, sore fingers and broken knuckles.
Thank you Mr. "I twist everyone's words on the Internet and use multi quote to put more emphasis on my points so I can sound awesome".

There's one on every forum.
 

Patz

Senior Member
You might want to consider lightly coating the sticks with Zildjian cymbal wax or a similar product. If you use this when you first start warming up, the grip will be easier on your hands and the friction that's sometimes caused by the stick moving around will be more comfortably eased as the pressure you need is less to control the sticks.
John Riley suggests this on his "Master Drummer" DVD.
I've used the wax from time to time and keep it in my gig bag.
Its very light w/no smell, easy to wash off but a good product to improve your initial grip without needing so much pressure on the sticks.
thanks! I'll check it out.
 

Patz

Senior Member
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CI0rSX7Jg-I

It's hard to master but it's rewarding. I used to play hard rock it made it so easy and way less tiring.

Technique really opens doors and unlocks your full potential. If you're holding on too tight you're going to wreck your arms not just your hands.

Carpal tunnel and tendonitis to name just a couple. A friend of mine retired after he got dystonia in his right arm and couldn't grip a stick after 15mins so it's really important to take care of your self.

I'm against any kind of grip on a drumstick, friction slows you down and gives you blisters!
thanks for the link. I've heard of the Moeller but never looked into it. I used to try to work on a pad at my desk while on the phone, but after I worked up Hot For Teacher, my co-workers had had enough..lol
 

Patz

Senior Member
I had the same problem when I first started playing years ago. I'd get blisters and break alot of sticks. The sticks I used were large too, which doesn't help.

In my opinion, you can alleviate this problem by holding the sticks more loosely in your hands, using your wrists for power rather than your forearms.
You might lose a few sticks at first while you're playing. Just have some extras nearby and hope you don't nail your guitar player too badly in the process.
I played a lot more loosely before joining this band. I think I may have tightened up a bit more after dropping a few sticks, which combined with increased attack on the cheap kit has led me to go into a death grip at times. I catch myself doing it here and there. I guess it's a combination of things I need to be more conscious of. What's the saying?..Recognizing you have a problem is the first step.
 
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