Budget tabletop drum layout question Pyle PTED06 / PTED01

walterg74

New Member
Hi folks, I know it's not a "real" drumset, but it's what I can use for now...

Regarding the Pyle portable drumsets, I am bit confused about the layout, and how to play.

I'm about to buy one, and will either go with Pyle Pro (PTED06) of which here is a pic:


IMG-4615.jpg


Or the Pyle PTED01, which is more or les the same (just the small bottom pad on that one is a little lower, aligned with the center of the other larger lower two).

My doubt is how do you play with this layout. The little lessons I took on a real kit, I played the HH with my right hand, and it's to the left and higher up. Here not only are they at the same level, but also it's to the right.

I read somewhere that suggested open playing would be better, but in the videos I saw of that, the HH is played with the left hand, meaning you would have to actually swap the default function of the pads, and also end up with a smaller area snare...

Would appreciate any insight to clear my confusion.

Thanks!!
 

Tiges

Well-known Member
Can they be rearranged to different positions the hi hat should be to the left it obviously has snare and tom toms move them in position like a acoustic setup which ones the kick drum I have no idea on those.
 

walterg74

New Member
Can they be rearranged to different positions the hi hat should be to the left it obviously has snare and tom toms move them in position like a acoustic setup which ones the kick drum I have no idea on those.

Yes. in theory you can re-assign as desired. The default layout is that top row, left to right, is: crash, tom 1, tom 2, ride and the bottom row is: snare, hi-hat, floor tom.

Kick drum is not a pad but a pedal that comes with the kit (and also a second pedal for HH).
 
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C. Dave Run

Gold Member
You are over thinking. Play the hats with the right, snare with the left. You are technically open handed because you arent crossed over, that's all.
 

walterg74

New Member
You are over thinking. Play the hats with the right, snare with the left. You are technically open handed because you arent crossed over, that's all.

I started getting doubts when I read that do to the same height level of snare and HH, it's hard to hit the floor tom pad without hitting your right hand/stick.
 

ColdFusion

Active Member
I started getting doubts when I read that do to the same height level of snare and HH, it's hard to hit the floor tom pad without hitting your right hand/stick.
C. Dave has it right. This is an "open" setup but better, cuz you still get to ride/HH with your right hand.

The 'oddest' thing about this default setup is that the hihat pad had to be crammed in between like that.
But I can totally imagine jamming on this thing. The deal with the floor tom is that many of the practical things you'll do on it will already have your hands in a convenient position.

For example, if you are playing an 8th or 16th note fill around the toms, starting with the high tom, your hands will be off of the HH/Snare pads to do this, so by the time you get around to the lowest tom your hand won't be in the way.

I see the issue like if you are riding the HH and you want to hit the floor tom but your right hand is both occupied and in the way. The upside is that this seems to be the only scenario where this thing might give you trouble. And with clever sticking and use of space in the notes, you can possibly mitigate this until you don't notice it anymore.

*I've never used a Pyle so I have zero input about quality, durability, response, sound, value, etc.
 

walterg74

New Member
C. Dave has it right. This is an "open" setup but better, cuz you still get to ride/HH with your right hand.

The 'oddest' thing about this default setup is that the hihat pad had to be crammed in between like that.
But I can totally imagine jamming on this thing. The deal with the floor tom is that many of the practical things you'll do on it will already have your hands in a convenient position.

For example, if you are playing an 8th or 16th note fill around the toms, starting with the high tom, your hands will be off of the HH/Snare pads to do this, so by the time you get around to the lowest tom your hand won't be in the way.

I see the issue like if you are riding the HH and you want to hit the floor tom but your right hand is both occupied and in the way. The upside is that this seems to be the only scenario where this thing might give you trouble. And with clever sticking and use of space in the notes, you can possibly mitigate this until you don't notice it anymore.

*I've never used a Pyle so I have zero input about quality, durability, response, sound, value, etc.

Yeah, somebody on another forum suggested to swap the HH pad with the crash pad. Not sure how that would turn out.

In general they're pretty good, here's one clip of the 06:

and one of the 01 (this one is actually Medeli DD315 but it's the exact same unit with different brand):

Sounds, some of the included kits are ok, but ultimately it has MIDI, so you can use something like Addictive Drums, etc.
 

ColdFusion

Active Member
I'm watching that first video and thinking that the stock sounds are at least crisp enough that it might be fun to use this to play along to drums-removed tracks from YT.
And if you had plugins you could get it sounding real nice.

One of the things that e-drums are good at is dialing in volume-wise with listening level music tracks.
If there is a 1/8" input that would be rad.
I run YT and soundcloud stuff through my V kit all the time.
Clean jams, bedroom volume.
 

walterg74

New Member
I'm watching that first video and thinking that the stock sounds are at least crisp enough that it might be fun to use this to play along to drums-removed tracks from YT.
And if you had plugins you could get it sounding real nice.

One of the things that e-drums are good at is dialing in volume-wise with listening level music tracks.
If there is a 1/8" input that would be rad.
I run YT and soundcloud stuff through my V kit all the time.
Clean jams, bedroom volume.
Yup. They have 1/8" AUX in, headphones out and USB MIDI :)
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I had the Yamaha dd65 compact electronic drum. I played it for years in a condo and the neighbors never complained. I don't think they knew that I had it. The bass drum pedal did not always work, it is a switch not a pedal.

It is not laid out like an acoustic drum kit but I learned to work with it. My friends and I gigged with it.

It also serves as a practice pad that makes lots of sounds. Sounds good in headphones.
 

roncadillac

Member
Hi folks, I know it's not a "real" drumset, but it's what I can use for now...

Regarding the Pyle portable drumsets, I am bit confused about the layout, and how to play.

I'm about to buy one, and will either go with Pyle Pro (PTED06) of which here is a pic:


IMG-4615.jpg


Or the Pyle PTED01, which is more or les the same (just the small bottom pad on that one is a little lower, aligned with the center of the other larger lower two).

My doubt is how do you play with this layout. The little lessons I took on a real kit, I played the HH with my right hand, and it's to the left and higher up. Here not only are they at the same level, but also it's to the right.

I read somewhere that suggested open playing would be better, but in the videos I saw of that, the HH is played with the left hand, meaning you would have to actually swap the default function of the pads, and also end up with a smaller area snare...

Would appreciate any insight to clear my confusion.

Thanks!!
I had a Yamaha version of that same table top ekit set up and could never get used to the middle hi hat thing (it's weird because I can even play acoustic drums with a center mounted hi hat just fine). You can reassign the hi hat sound to a different pad but the pedal only works on that pad.

So everywhere I look the pyle pro you mentioned in your OP seems to be selling for about $170-$190... Can you swing an extra $30-$50? The reason I ask is you can get donner ded 70 for about $215-$230. It is a super entry level beginner ekit however it is set up like a 'real' drum kit, includes everything you need out of the box, and will be a much more enjoyable and worthy learning experience for you at a very minimal additional cost. If you can't afford it, I would say skip the pyle and wait a few months until you can.
 
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