best STAVE snare builder?

Drum Guy

Member
anyone care to offer up their fav current (not Brady :)) stave/block snare drum builder anyplace in the world? May ask them to build me a 12x7 snare.

One vote from experience says Daville Drums is a good one...who else?
 
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Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
I've been a fan of Mike from Outlaw Drums out of Georgia, USA. His stave built snares & whole kits are made from recycled structures. So your snare could've once been a civil war building or a fence that's been up since WWII.
Or new wood if you're after that.

Finishes are stained natural with grains & patterns honoring the wood. No wraps. Well built and heavy.
https://outlawdrums.com/
 
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C. Dave Run

Gold Member
I've been a fan of Mike from Outlaw Drums. His stave built snares & whole kits are made from recycled structures. So your snare could've once been a civil war building or a fence that's been up since WWII.
That's really cool. Does the drum come with a history lesson also?
 

drumbandit

Silver Member
If not Brady then Red Rock. The team are great the drum build quality is 10/10 and they look and sound incredible
 

Drum Guy

Member
thanks everyone - actually was thinking of getting a 12x7 purpleheart stave since steambent at 12" might not work (splits and cracks I bet)...I do have a Red Rocks 12x7 Rose Sheoak and its great yes. Might email Noonan which seems has reasonable prices as well as great offerings.
 

drumbandit

Silver Member
You can get a used Noonan for a few hundred quid £ if you look around. I've heard rave reviews of his snares
 

motleyh

Senior Member
thanks everyone - actually was thinking of getting a 12x7 purpleheart stave since steambent at 12" might not work (splits and cracks I bet)...I do have a Red Rocks 12x7 Rose Sheoak and its great yes. Might email Noonan which seems has reasonable prices as well as great offerings.
No reason to believe that steambent 12" snare drums aren't viable. There's no problem doing 12" toms, so there's no problem with 12" snare shells either. Granted, some species or figuring can be more difficult to bend, but that doesn't necessarily mean the challenge is related to diameter. If you want steambent, get it.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
No reason to believe that steambent 12" snare drums aren't viable. There's no problem doing 12" toms, so there's no problem with 12" snare shells either. Granted, some species or figuring can be more difficult to bend, but that doesn't necessarily mean the challenge is related to diameter. If you want steambent, get it.

Stave has a lower pitch and a clearer fundamental, and will not go out-of-round.
 

Drum Mer

Platinum Member
No reason to believe that steambent 12" snare drums aren't viable. There's no problem doing 12" toms, so there's no problem with 12" snare shells either. Granted, some species or figuring can be more difficult to bend, but that doesn't necessarily mean the challenge is related to diameter. If you want steambent, get it.
Diameter is the reason why Craviotto doesn’t make 8” drums though.

And some woods aren’t doable on a smaller diameter because they are too hard by nature to bend.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
I don't know who's "best", but I'm gonna get one of these from a maker in my town of residence when I get the scratch: http://salemstreetdrums.com
 

Drum Guy

Member
I don't know who's "best", but I'm gonna get one of these from a maker in my town of residence when I get the scratch: http://salemstreetdrums.com

Thanks for that suggestion… he said he doesn’t do 12 inch diameter snares but only 14 and it wouldn’t be till the end of the year roughly before I could even do those

Still waiting to hear from Noonan drums about a 12 x 7 purpleheart
 
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s1212z

Silver Member
What makes a stave less vulnerable? I seem to read more about stave snare splitting around here than a modern 1 ply going out of round.
 

Drum Mer

Platinum Member
What makes a stave less vulnerable? I seem to read more about stave snare splitting around here than a modern 1 ply going out of round.

It's not perse (a log drum is the most vulnerable out there).

The difference is you can still play a stave split snare perfectly fine (the forces of the heads bound them together).

A damaged log or ply is usually the end of the snare.
 

s1212z

Silver Member
It's not perse (a log drum is the most vulnerable out there).

The difference is you can still play a stave split snare perfectly fine (the forces of the heads bound them together).

A damaged log or ply is usually the end of the snare.
Interesting, didn't know a stave could continue to be played though I imagine still concerning. I can't imagine owning a true solid log and have it shatter. From what I read Canopus worked to disperse the tension and age for moisture to minimize this issue but I imagine still a concern

Stave are more susceptible to cracking and splitting . They are very prone to this of dropped. I have seen stave shells that have broken apart when accidentally dropped (when in a case !) .

The majority of us are careful with our gear and the potential for cracking is minimized but it will always be a possibility . Much of the cracking issue depends on how the staves are made and connected together . Some staves are just flat edges glued together . Others have some kind of joint where the staves attach on additional to the glue .

Stave shell snares have fostered a variety boutique builders specializing in this style of drum .Stave snares have their own vibe and sound . I like them , my last stage snare was a walnut 14 x 6 by Salem Street Drums . Very well made .

Good info, never owned a stave but samples (particularly on snares) have been intriguing. Alot of methods and out there.

Speaking of Tamburo mentioned above, curious on their construction which seems complete different than the rest of the field. Supposedly they have an internal reinforcement, (perhaps stronger?). Seems they have thinner shell too comparatively as staves seem to be thicker.

 

Drum Mer

Platinum Member
Interesting, didn't know a stave could continue to be played though I imagine still concerning.

I played a few for years without any issues. As they get locked due to the heads it's the same as when they were glued together.

Of course this only works with one block separation, not more.

Tambura's original Opera shells are fairly thin and not shaved on the outside, but they also are different as they use a resin bearing edge.

Screenshot 2022-06-14 at 16.45.09.jpg


 
as a stave builder myself who frequented drumshed & ghostnote back when they were things, I'd say motley of carolina drums (who responded in the thread) is an excellent choice. I struggle to remember many of the builders who came and went. Always admired unix' work but, idk if he's still doing it. But, anyway, those drums of motley's compare well to anyone's
 
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