Zildjian Z-Custom 19" Trash Ride, does it break easily?

Reilly98

Junior Member
hi, ive been wanting to get a zildjian z-custom 19" trash ride cymbals, but im a hard hitter and ive seen that its very light and wobbly (for want of a better word) :p.

can it take a beating? or should i look towards something else?
 

Steamer

Platinum Member
Any cymbal regardless of maker at any size, weight or thickness will break if hit hard enough.
 

Reilly98

Junior Member
I did answer it. Thick or thin, small, large or heavy they are all prone to cracking under ultra heavy use and continues hard hits.

sorry if a aggravated you, i meant that i just wanted to know how durable this particular cymbal was, sorry.
 

Steamer

Platinum Member
sorry if a aggravated you, i meant that i just wanted to know how durable this particular cymbal was, sorry.
No worries just indicating that any cymbal is not beyond breaking well experiencing continous heavy hits and the related metal fatique that comes with it.

Good luck with getting firsthand user feedback on this specific pie you're after.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
sorry if a aggravated you, i meant that i just wanted to know how durable this particular cymbal was, sorry.
Well, given it's rather thick, it should hold up well. I've owned many cymbals from the Z line, and they take a lot of abuse, but I've also broken them, but maybe because I used to use tree trunks fro drum sticks.

But as said, if you hit any cymbal hard enough, it will break.

It all depends on how you play, how big your sticks are, how hard you kit, and the way you hit. Asking if a cymbal is or isn't going to break depends on many factors, the least of which is the cymbals design. It's not like cymbal makers design cymbals thinking "I know, lets make something that will break after a certain number of hits."
 
M

Mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
I still don't understand why people think that thicker cymbals are less prone to breakage. I've seen more Z Customs cracked on this forum than any other cymbal - that'll be for two reasons. i) Hard hitters buy them thinking they are more durable ii) thicker cymbals are less flexible and hence more brittle and prone to breakage than a thinner cymbal. 2oo2's can take a beating, but they're also very flexible. And half the thickness, too.
 

sticksnstonesrus

Silver Member
Hence the stellar advice from the others before me...it's all true. Thick, thin, heavy, light...putting the good wood to it enough...it'll break.

Now specific to a "ride"...you might not, and probably won't do any damage if staying on the tips of the stick...but it sounds like your aim is to be crash/riding the cymbal...and with that, it falls into the "most suseptible to breakage" category.

Crash riding is unlike just regular crash-swatting in that playing the edge (or bow) repeatedly, exponentially magnifies the stressors applied. It's not just a simple single hit where the energy is allowed to dissapate. Quarter/eigth note riding places a substantial bit more and adds the difference of strike angles because of the repeated hits...meaning each hit isn't a consistent strike angle whereas letting a cymbal return to its resting position ensures that you're maximizing the right angle of strike.

IMHO playing a relatively thin crash/ride (medium) vs. a thick/heavy cymbal works to a two-fold adavntage. Not having to apply crazy-huge power to a crash equals longevity. A drummer can "look" like he's killing it without truly "bashing" but is really playing with great technique. Thick cymbals require more "swat" to make them speak.

Secondly, for years I played "Rock" or "Heavy" weighted cymbals...now playing Vaults which are significantly thinner by design. They've lasted a lot longer than any of the others. Pay it forward to better technique, better cymbal composition, and a lack of money...either way, and to finally make a point...the Trash ride...even if it's thinner, if you care for how you play it, it will provide a long service life.
 

KaBoom21

Member
The Thrash Ride is like a cross between an A Custom and a Z Custom. See lots of cracked/repaired Zs on eBay, but not the Thrash Ride.

It's a cool, versitle cymbal, but the point about crash-riding stressors is right on.
 
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