Zildjian L80 low volume cymbals

LanceCampeau

Senior Member
I've made a few 22 gauge steel crashes and rides that have a decent tone/feel and more subdued volume output... Hard to quantify the reduction, but if I had to guess I'd say they are about 6 to 10 dB less then similar sized bronze cymbals... Ideal for small club jazz...
 

Dignan

Silver Member
I started a thread about them last month: http://www.drummerworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=126189

I don't think there's a lot of interest in them. But to me it seems like they'd be ideal for quiet practice, and maybe other uses too.
I haven't actually heard them in person yet though.

ah, didn't see that thread. Sorry.

Anyway, I'm definitely going to get at least a pair of hats and the crash/ride to put on my quiet practice kit. It's solely about being able to practice in my house when kids are sleeping or someone is watching TV, etc.

Right now for cymbals I have real hats and an old ride with the rubber pads over them. We all know how much those suck.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Bit of a money spinner from Zildjian here. Won't be the same feel at all I'd imagine it to be like playing a giant cheese grater but not as useful!

I used plastic cymbals on my practice kit. Did the job well and mesh heads on the drums. Drilled holes in the Hi hats to stop the air lock

Before my time you could get something called 'top of the pops' cymbals which were used on the aforementioned programme. They were fibreglass I think and were used so miming bands looked like they were playing.

They need to start making em again!
 

triitone

Junior Member
Just curious if anyone has tried spray rubber to coat cymbals for low volume practice? In my case, I would like a low volume setup of bass drum, snare, and hi hats that I could play outside without annoying the neighbors. I have a bass drum pad and can put a Silent Stroke head on an old snare. I have a pair of crappy MMX hi hats that I would be willing to spray with rubber or drill to reduce volume. Anyone tried either of these? If so how did it work?

Thanks!!
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Bit of a money spinner from Zildjian here. Won't be the same feel at all I'd imagine it to be like playing a giant cheese grater but not as useful!

I used plastic cymbals on my practice kit. Did the job well and mesh heads on the drums. Drilled holes in the Hi hats to stop the air lock

Before my time you could get something called 'top of the pops' cymbals which were used on the aforementioned programme. They were fibreglass I think and were used so miming bands looked like they were playing.

They need to start making em again!

So you're saying you haven't played them.

They actually feel suprisingly good, all things considered. Certainly much better on your soft tissue than rubber pads and electronic cymbal pads that destroy technique.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Actually, these are the best you'll for this purpose today IMO.

They feel pretty real. As more sizes are made available you should be able to get it pretty right.

Now, the only thing that's not realistic is using them just to keep volume down. They can be used for effect with the right tools, but it's mostly about feel. The hats a fabulous as you can do anything you'd normally do.

There's offcourse nothing you can do about stick attack and stll keep it real, so that's a big part of the sound.

I have a drum room in the boat house, so no internet or anything there.

I have these set up with my Super Pad practice kit in my home.


Even if you have only hats, ride, snare and BD pad you can do it all realisitcally. Work on grooves linear stuff, do anyting thing with bthse hats and ride that you can do on a regular kit.

I'd call them quite a blessing. Especially in this day and age.

I've always had a lot time and a room to be loud in, so even that after hours extra playing around while watching TV or whatever would be great on a full kit. There's no way to isolate things that much, though. Vibration will always be there. Now I actually can.
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
I have a set of these:
33219175235_bda727db82_c.jpg


Other than the mildly obnoxious stick tip sound you get from them, they are amazing. Rubber pads don't quite have the same feel (though I dont mind rubber pads that much) and spraying rubber on to existing cymbals will likely end up with poor results.
 

jmagnum

Junior Member
These have been great as a low volume alternative. I've even come across some good song recordings using these cymbals. I really like the sound of the hi-hats with the crash being my least favorite.

My guess is there has been plenty of interest and business in this segment as Sabian is releasing a similar series called Quiet Tone coming out in January 2018 (US).
 

newoldie

Silver Member
These have been great as a low volume alternative. I've even come across some good song recordings using these cymbals. I really like the sound of the hi-hats with the crash being my least favorite.

My guess is there has been plenty of interest and business in this segment as Sabian is releasing a similar series called Quiet Tone coming out in January 2018 (US).

Thanks for the heads up on this new Sabian cymbal series.

I just found one Sabian Vault video on YT with a little info on the cymbals https://youtu.be/TEbbb4Oa7hw,

some basic info on Sabian's web site http://sabian.com/en/pages/quiet-to...3LB6CvHMArUnkx7mcl3vQUP6oy8EYrgOzotN1an64Flzw

and Drum Center New Hampshire https://www.drumcenternh.com/sabian-quiet-tone-practice-cymbals-set-qtpc501.html


I currently use the Zildjian LV cymbals (1 ride, 2 crashes, 1 hi hat) but would be interested in trying the Sabian version as well since I need these for practice.
 

ermghoti

Silver Member
I see Sabian had the sense to offer a hats-ride-crash1-crash2 package. I had to get the L80 hat-crash-crash/ride set, then get the ride separately, and use the crash/ride as a crash. It's a little weird, because the crash/ride is higher pitched than the crash if you hit it with the stick tip, but lower and louder if you hit it with the shank. I have half a mind to track down the 14" crash, but it's not sold as a single piece, so I'm halfheartedly picking through eBay.

As it is, they are a good sounding, good feeling, reasonable volume option. They certainly aren't silent, but I've got a set of Quietstrokes doctored up, and I can practice any time I want (single family house) without anything distressingly wrong with the sound or feel. They'd be great for an at-home jam or low volume performance.

The best compromise for me was to use the foam practice tips (I guess they sell the sticks with the tips glued on too), and angle everything so only the tips will contact the cymbals. I have a couple sticks that I've taped the shank a little to stop the "poink" of the stick ringing off the attack, but the shank strokes are way louder than tip hits, particularly on the ride, so it's tough to combine them.
 
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