Your Preferred Method of Snare Drum Muffling

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I love my Snareweight M80. You can choose the amount of muffling you need on the fly. They give the perfect amount of ring control without losing the feel of the head.
 

microkit

Senior Member
playing out, nothing.
in band space, is use a bulldog clip with felt or small piece of rubber. or if the snare comes with internal muffler...i use it!
Which strainer do you happen to have on your snare? Also I see your star washers on the tension rods, very clever.
 

ToneT

Well-known member
There is no oil in Pinstripes. The colors are created by the effect of light bending between the two plies. This effect is called "Newtons Rings".
 

wraub

Well-known member
I use an Aquarian Regulator on the bass drum reso, and, lately the snare has an HD Dry batter.

What are people's thoughts on pre-muffled heads? There are tons of them out there but I really wonder if they are worthwhile.
 

roncadillac

Member
My preferred method of snare drum muffling is a combination of the coating on the batter head and the tuning of the reso head being just almost to the point of choking. It gives me a nice open drum without errant overtones, a solid rim shot, and plenty of sensitivity for ghost notes. Since switching from a coated g1/g12 to a UV1 I've found a nice drop in my overall pitch while maintaining the cut I had previously.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
My preferred method of snare drum muffling is a combination of the coating on the batter head and the tuning of the reso head being just almost to the point of choking. It gives me a nice open drum without errant overtones, a solid rim shot, and plenty of sensitivity for ghost notes. Since switching from a coated g1/g12 to a UV1 I've found a nice drop in my overall pitch while maintaining the cut I had previously.
My dominant formula as well. Nothing beats a Coated Ambassador and a tight reso head. The sound is crisp and clean. Impure overtones are erased pretty quickly.
 

roncadillac

Member
My dominant formula as well. Nothing beats a Coated Ambassador and a tight reso head. The sound is crisp and clean. Impure overtones are erased pretty quickly.
For years I dealt with overtones (whiney 'cat' like overtones) on every friggin snare I ever owned and nothing ever took it away... Until I experimented with high reso tunings and BOOM problem solved.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
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For years I dealt with overtones (whiney 'cat' like overtones) on every friggin snare I ever owned and nothing ever took it away... Until I experimented with high reso tunings and BOOM problem solved.
No question. My snare reso is always cranked. Anything less sounds slovenly to me. I want my snare to crack and pop, not to burp and buzz.
 

Ryan Culberson

Well-known member
Various sizes of rings for me... both the Remo Richie Rings and the Big Fat Snare Drum with the hole in the middle. One reason I use rings is because my main band plays a crazy range of covers and originals, from old school country to contemporary pop, and everything in between. That huge range requires quite a bit of snare sound variety, from wide open to heavily muffled. The rings give me that.

Another reason is because that same band never has a set list made. Singer just calls them out as he's feeling it any given night. The rings are on and off in a couple of seconds which is all the time I usually have to react to whatever song he's called out.
 

wraub

Well-known member
...is it wrong that I've been using an Evans HD Dry batter with a ring on top? I know it seems like it would contradict the holes, but I find that there's a slight lift of the ring on the edge/holes that keeps it extra dry while still letting the drum "speak".


I may just be weird.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
...is it wrong that I've been using an Evans HD Dry batter with a ring on top? I know it seems like it would contradict the holes, but I find that there's a slight lift of the ring on the edge/holes that keeps it extra dry while still letting the drum "speak".


I may just be weird.
It's not wrong if you like a dryer, fatter sound, which isn't my cup of tea. I aim for a crisp, responsive snare, so I like a single-ply coated head and a tighter tuning. The only snare with a bad sound is one whose sound you disapprove of.
 

wraub

Well-known member
Don't get me wrong, the reso is pretty well cranked, but I find that even the slight ring is too much for me.
Bear in mind that I am approaching this from an accuracy standpoint with an ideal for recording in mind, so I admit that in a live context (assuming I can attain that eventual level of competency) I would almost definitely remove the ring.


QUOTE="C.M. Jones, post: 1713490, member: 525615"]
It's not wrong if you like a dryer, fatter sound, which isn't my cup of tea. I aim for a crisp, responsive snare, so I like a single-ply coated head and a tighter tuning. The only snare with a bad sound is one whose sound you disapprove of.
[/QUOTE]
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Don't get me wrong, the reso is pretty well cranked, but I find that even the slight ring is too much for me.
Bear in mind that I am approaching this from an accuracy standpoint with an ideal for recording in mind, so I admit that in a live context (assuming I can attain that eventual level of competency) I would almost definitely remove the ring.
Oh, there's nothing wrong with tone-control rings. I apply them to my toms at times. They work on snares just fine too, though I rarely want my snare to be that dry. That's why I like a strip of blue painter's tape on my snare batter. It quells a few overtones without smothering the head's vibration. It all comes down to what you're going for.
 
I've always liked using heads with a ring built into them. I played Evans HD for years then when I switched to Remo I started using the Powerstroke X and the P77.
 

MusiQmaN

Platinum Member
I added some holes in he head of my new 15x10 snare.

It dries out the tone like an Evans Genera Dry.
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I will try some Slapkatz too.

I love the internal muffler of my 65 Supra.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
A good snare is like a nice Ribeye steak. It usually needs nothing but some salt, pepper, and a little smoke from the cook.

If I'm going for the muffled sound, it's usually a lot of muffling for the really short flat sound.

I don't find the benefit of just a little bit of moon gel. It's either a lot of muffling or none for me.
 
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