Your Preferred Method of Snare Drum Muffling

cdrums21

Gold Member
I think the only way to utilise that head effectively in terms of tuning is it just needs an above normal tension......for me, exceedingly high. It just hits this point where it truly opens up and explodes.
Yes, I've seen videos and know of drummers who had them tuned too low IMO. They can sound tubby at a tuning where another head may sound good. Keep going up past that tubbiness and then the head starts coming into its zone. They really do open up and have a nice tone and pop at higher tensions. I don't tune mine super high like you do, but it is slightly tighter than other tunings I use with different heads. I think the thickness of the head gives it that "thicker" sound and still retains that mid-rangey punch at a higher tension.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I'm with ya man, I have an Empeor X on my black beauty and at a little higher tuning, the head sounds great on that drum, tames the ringing of the brass shell just enough. A lot of people comment about the thickness and it being unresponsive....which is true to a small degree, but for playing loud rock back beats, it works great and sounds fat and powerful. The sound guys I've worked with have no problems with the snare in the front of house sans muffling.
I think the Emperor X is Remo's heaviest head. It must be indestructible. I've heard some good reviews, but the Coated Ambassador is the gold standard on snare drums for my purposes. I just don't favor the loss of sensitivity that comes with a double-ply snare head. We each have our own value systems.
 

Neilage

Junior Member
The Ludwig Tone Control knob on older Supras & Acros is my preferred muffling method, hands down. I wish they were standard options for all drum makers, including for toms.

My 2nd choice would be the Remo's/E-Rings.
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
I think the Emperor X is Remo's heaviest head. It must be indestructible. I've heard some good reviews, but the Coated Ambassador is the gold standard on snare drums for my purposes. I just don't favor the loss of sensitivity that comes with a double-ply snare head. We each have our own value systems.
The emperor X is the thickest Remo head yes. I love a coated ambassador on my black beauty as well, but it just doesn’t last long enough for my purposes. I use them in the studio though.
 

Stevedot2

Well-known member
I use a Remo coated Powerstroke 3 on both my snares. No muffling.
With that head you don't need any muffling, the thing is basically a purpose built muffling device!! Haha. Actually used to be my favourite head but trying to go with a more open sound now... If I ever get to actually play drums again.
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
With that head you don't need any muffling, the thing is basically a purpose built muffling device!! Haha. Actually used to be my favourite head but trying to go with a more open sound now... If I ever get to actually play drums again.
I'm aware of that. The upside of that head to me is that it is a single ply in the center with an under side trim ring at the bearing edge which BTW is where most of your unwanted overtones emanate from.
 

AudioWonderland

Silver Member
I'm still confused about pinstripes... I was under the impression there is nothing between the two plys, the clear version appears to have a slight oily substance but that this is just a trick of the light caused by the two plys interacting. The muffling part comes from the outer edges being fues together.

That was my understanding but I see different opinions all over the place. I had clear pinstripes on my old Dw maple kit, they sounded great regardless of how exactly they're made.
You have it right. The outer edge is the only place where there is anything,
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
It absolutely varies depending on the room/situation. I use everything from Moongels, to Big Fat Snare Drum things, to the leather patch to a small towel.


The one thing I never do is play the snare without muffling. I probably could have skipped muffling at some of the bigger shows I have played, but I am so used to the sound of a slightly muffled snare drum that anything else sounds off to me.
 

Good Karma

Well-known member
I use a Remo 14" tom ring, they are smaller than Remo snare rings. I want some but not so much it sounds flat.
I don't like moon gel, it seems after a short amount of time they kinda start dissolving into a piece of used chewing gum.
Not ideal when you have to retune
 

Captain Bash

Silver Member
I use the small rim clip-on leather dampener (m1b snare weight) or if I want a real thonk I use two. I like how you can easily flip them up if you want to return to a non dampened sound. Definitely more flexible than moon gel or gaff tape. I don’t bother with the magnet mid settings. It’s a very simple design that works well and stands up to gigging (simple and bomb proof) and also works for recording (no weird rattles and consistent).
 
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KamaK

Platinum Member
Several threads have been launched as of late on the topic of overtone control, mostly as it pertains to toms. This thread focuses on snare drums. What do you do, if anything, to muffle your snare?
If I want to eliminate overtones, I'll hit the snare dead center. If I want to add mild overtones, I strike slightly off center. If I want crazy harmonics, I will hit more toward the outer edge.

If I were a gigging drummer, and had an entire set that required an overtone-less snare sound, I'd probably just get a control top head so I didn't have to waste mental bandwidth thinking about where I need to hit the snare.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
If I want to eliminate overtones, I'll hit the snare dead center.
Yes, a vital point. Striking the snare dead-center is the most efficient means of quelling overtones. It's amazing how venturing even a millimeter off-center can drastically effect the cleanliness of the snare's voice.
 

gish

Senior Member
Fact- 99% of snare drum ring resolves to pleasant, lively snare tone 10 feet or so in front of the kit in an unmicd live gig.

Fact- 99% of sound guys will ask you to muffle your snare ring in a micd live gig.

Fact- Play enough gigs and you will encounter both scenarios.

Fact- These are facts I’VE encountered in my playing life; your results may vary of course. Few things in life are absolute for all.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Fact- 99% of snare drum ring resolves to pleasant, lively snare tone 10 feet or so in front of the kit in an unmicd live gig.

Fact- 99% of sound guys will ask you to muffle your snare ring in a micd live gig.

Fact- Play enough gigs and you will encounter both scenarios.
All true, Gish. The norm for me has always been a wide-open snare without microphones and a strip or two of painter's tape with microphones, though exceptions have arisen.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Fact- 99% of snare drum ring resolves to pleasant, lively snare tone 10 feet or so in front of the kit in an unmicd live gig.

Fact- 99% of sound guys will ask you to muffle your snare ring in a micd live gig.

Fact- Play enough gigs and you will encounter both scenarios.

Fact- These are facts I’VE encountered in my playing life; your results may vary of course. Few things in life are absolute for all.
I'm trying to figure out how your post manifests Dwight Shroot's voice in my head.
 
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