Your book collection

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
While I see your point that you can come up with endless exercises from a few sticking patterns and that it's a good technique builder, I disagree that you only need that page. This argument seems like "You only need the C Major scale - you can derive the rest from that".
Reading and interpreting notes and pauses, different styles of music, odd time signatures, mixed note values like triplets and 8ths, transcriptions, explanations and a structure of how and what to learn in which order... That's pretty hard to get from page one of Stick Control.
Say I'd like to work on jazz comping on the snare with triplets: I don't want to combine the first 6 notes of Exc. 1 and the the last 6 notes of Exc. 7 and play the left hand rhythm with a bunch of random accents to come up with one bar. Also, getting a third voice going is pretty awkward with binary "Right Left" information. If I can remember all of this stuff while practicing, I'm probably advanced enough to no longer need page one sitting on my note stand.
Also, a single lesson costs more than a book, so even if I only get a few things out of one book, I'd say it's worth it.

What I mean is that it’s the only method book you really need. If you want to play actual music, then listen to music, look for drum transcriptions, etc.. You can write your own exercises to help you master specific pieces. I think people are better off learning to write their own exercises than just playing from a method book. I write a lot of my own warmups and exercises, and/or adapt other peoples’ exercises for my own needs.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Reading and interpreting notes and pauses, different styles of music, odd time signatures, mixed note values like triplets and 8ths, transcriptions, explanations and a structure of how and what to learn in which order... That's pretty hard to get from page one of Stick Control.
Say I'd like to work on jazz comping on the snare with triplets: I don't want to combine the first 6 notes of Exc. 1 and the the last 6 notes of Exc. 7 and play the left hand rhythm with a bunch of random accents to come up with one bar.
You can do a lot of stuff with Stone if you're creative enough with it, but at some point it becomes not very constructive-- when it requires a lot of mental work that is different from the mental work of just playing the drums and reading normally. And reading Rs and Ls in an 8th note rhythm is just not great for understanding what you're doing musically. It's better to just read a rhythm and make a drum interpretation of that-- which is exactly what you do when reading a drum chart or a lead sheet, which is why I do most of my practicing with Syncopation.

Thinking in binary patterns can be useful when improvising a texture, where the actual rhythm doesn't matter.

Also, getting a third voice going is pretty awkward with binary "Right Left" information. If I can remember all of this stuff while practicing, I'm probably advanced enough to no longer need page one sitting on my note stand.
Also, a single lesson costs more than a book, so even if I only get a few things out of one book, I'd say it's worth it.
It's like, why not. Some books contain actual information you didn't already know, or make you think of different things to do, or make it easier to develop things you were trying to do the stupidly hard way with another book. I don't need everything I do to involve a technical challenge or major reading problem; most often I want things that help me develop fluency with an easy idea or system.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I feel like a bad drummer. I didn't keep my books. I gave them to my brother when he started playing like 15 years ago. Now I just have links to the 40 PAS rudiments and 507 Hybrid rudiments on my phone.

I feel like the 40 give me everything I need. I like to mix and match, forward and backward, hybrid them together, so on and so forth. They sort of become math problems.
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
A bunch of my books were sold to students decades ago.

Many have battle scars on them. Some are in great shape, while others, I am on my 3rd or 4th copy. The Elementay Rubank was my very first book.

I also have a binder of misc. sheets handed to me by various teachers over the years. A bunch were from the years I spent taking lessons at the Drummer's Collective in NYC back in the mid/late-1980's.

Some I've never stopped using.

There are still others in my tote but just didn't feel like digging them out.

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GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I was reading The Structure of Evolutionary Theory by Gould, Biochemistry of Smooth Muscle Contraction-Barany, Biomechanics-YC Fung, etc. No drum books. I guess it shows. But it's never to late.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I was reading The Structure of Evolutionary Theory by Gould, Biochemistry of Smooth Muscle Contraction-Barany, Biomechanics-YC Fung, etc. No drum books. I guess it shows. But it's never to late.
Art are you trying to build a cyborg? Or mech appendages for drumming? You know, like singles for days, 800 MPH paradiddles, stuff like that? Oh I know! It's a hat, isn't it? You put it on and think about drumming and it just happens. It snaps into these little ports in the head, and controls a robot drummer. I dig it. The turkey leg pedal makes perfect sense now!
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
I've been growing my catalog for the last 15 years. Before that it was a small collection of Jim Chapin, Haskel Harr, and Schinstine's Southern Special (ie boring).

Right now, I work out of:
The Art of Bop Drumming - John Riley
Beyond Bop Drumming - John Riley
Brazilian Coordination for the Drumset - Maria Martinez

Afro-Caribbean & Brazilian Rhythms for the Drums - theCollective
Conversations in Clave - Horacio Hernandez

Other books I have that are on my horizon:
The Jazz Drummer's Workshop - John Riley
Exploring Your Creativity On The Drumset - Mark Guiliani
Pathways of Motion - Steve Smith
The Commandments of The Halftime Shuffle - Zoro
Time Functioning Patterns - Gary Chaffee
Sticking Patterns - Gary Chaffee
Technique Patterns - Gary Chaffee
The Code of Funk - David Garibaldi

Oops, another pile (still in mint condition):
1001 Drum Grooves - Steve Mansfield
The Complete Guide to Playing Brushes - Florian Alexandru-Zorn, Stanton Moore
The Drum Perspective - Peter Erskine
Chart Reading Workbook for Drummers - Bobby Gabriele
The Drummers Bible - Mick Berry, Jason Gianni
Stickings and Orchestration for Drumset - Casey Scheuerell
Rudiment Grooves for the Drumset - Rick Considine
Fusion: A Study in Contemporary Music for the Drums - Kim Plainfield
Groove Essentials - Tommy Igoe
Survival Guide for the Modern Drummer - Jim Riley
Cuban Rhythms for Percussion and Drumset - Also Mazza
Portraits In Rhythm - Anthony Cirone
 
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Last photo from 4 yrs ago. About twenty new ones since. I love having a library of styles and am always on the search for rare, advanced, and stylistically diverse books that have a good balance of notation and text.

I was keeping up with playing through them until a few years ago. Now it’s all power engineering books.

Thanks for reviving this thread, there are some some great pictures of books for me to track down now.
 

Alain Rieder

Silver Member
I like buying drum books and I also enjoy writing my own.

These days I practice from a book that I'm writing and which I think is amazing.
The structure is done, I started the layout, it is about Melodic drumming, and I look forward publishing it.

I also like my Time Manipulation book which is available in printed form in English and French as well as in ebook format from Hudson Music in both languages.

About other books, I like many more, but these are important:
Syncopation (which was part of the inspiration to write Time Manipulation)
All of the Jim Blackley books
Vinnie's Book, the most expensive one, and because it is a piece of art in itself (by Vinnie Ruggiero, not Colaiuta).

I own many other books that I like, and I'm curious, so I have these three rows in my studio, but I still have enough to fill one or two more shelves. I will take more pictures of other books that I particularly like. I also have many other music books, as well as my collection of Modern Drummer since 1977.

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JUZZI

Active member
I am totally not ashamed to say that when i first started learning drums i bought a 'drums for dummies' book and I can honestly say for someone who knew zero about drums at the time this was brilliant for an everything you need to know knowledge book.

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hawksmoor

Senior Member
Got no pictures at hand, but off the top of my head, the books I go back to regularly are Zoro's Commandments of R&B Drumming, Daniel Glass' Commandments of Early R&B Drumming, Jim Payne's Advanced Funk Drumming, 100 Famous Funk Beats and Give The Drummers Some (most of the grooves from 100 Famous Beats are included in the back of Give The Drummers Some, but the latter is more of a regular reading book, with the Q&A interviews), and The Breakbeat Bible by Michael Adamo.
 

hawksmoor

Senior Member
Absolutely agree, Hewitt2. Learnt a lot from that book, especially on the drum breaks that have been sampled and really swinging the bass drum. It's a book written with a lot of love for funk/soul/hip-hop. Oh, I forgot Stanton Moore's Groove Alchemy.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Good to see this thread revived. Since I last replied, I have probably added dozens of books to my collection. Of course I buy some, but I am sent ones on a regular basis to review for the Percussive Notes Journal.

The prized possession of my collection is one of the first copies of Accents and Rebounds ever printed. It was given to Joe Morello by George Lawrence Stone. Joe was given the first copy off the press, but Stone was nice enough to include six additional autographed copies to hand out to students. I’m not sure how many copies Joe had at the time of his passing. I know the first one will be housed in a museum (not sure which one). I acquired this copy from one of Joe’s long time drum techs.FB2647F8-CB0C-4E95-BD0A-F239046EFEA6.jpeg
 

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dmacc_2

Well-known member
Good to see this thread revived. Since I last replied, I have probably added dozens of books to my collection. Of course I buy some, but I am sent ones on a regular basis to review for the Percussive Notes Journal.

The prized possession of my collection is one of the first copies of Accents and Rebounds ever printed. It was given to Joe Morello by George Lawrence Stone. Joe was given the first copy off the press, but Stone was nice enough to include six additional autographed copies to hand out to students. I’m not sure how many copies Joe had at the time of his passing. I know the first one will be housed in a museum (not sure which one). I acquired this copy from one of Joe’s long time drum techs.View attachment 90629
Awesome!!
 

acsunda

Junior Member
A bit off topic but speaking of drummers and books, Neil Peart has written several great books about his travels. I've only read one, Ghost Rider (about his epic road trip following the deaths of his wife and daughter), which was great, and I'm told the others are all very good.
 
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