YOUR BETTER AT BECAUSE OF DRUMS

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I am terrible at lyrics as for remembering them. I can remember drums fills from 50 years ago. Bass lines were always important and interesting to me. And I was an early lover of all types of keyboards. For me, this forum, has been the biggest education tool for music as a whole. Recording techniques, the fact that there even existed studio, or session musicians, names of drummers in bands other than the Beatles, or Rolling Stones. Just never paid attention. An overall music education, both from drumming and from being on this forum.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I am terrible at lyrics as for remembering them. I can remember drums fills from 50 years ago. Bass lines were always important and interesting to me. And I was an early lover of all types of keyboards. For me, this forum, has been the biggest education tool for music as a whole. Recording techniques, the fact that there even existed studio, or session musicians, names of drummers in bands other than the Beatles, or Rolling Stones. Just never paid attention. An overall music education, both from drumming and from being on this forum.
I don't even typically hear them as words most of the time. Lyrics in my head just get converted to their melodic note progressions and essentially get treated like another instrument. You could sing literal total nonsense and I wouldn't know the difference unless you sang it out of key or hit wrong notes. Sometimes a lead lyric or chorus will make it through to me as a real set of words. Depends. Once I've heard a song a hundred times only then will I start to hear the words. Pretty weird how my head is like that. I often kind of "visualize" music as I play in my head and I think words just aren't a part of that visual landscape.
 

RIneuron

Senior Member
It has also been interesting to me to find how my music listening has changed. I am now much more analytic in my first or second listening to a new piece of music. Musicians hear (or attend to) things non-musicians do not.
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
More from being in bands, rather than drums as such. But I'm definitely more diplomatic, and definitely handle myself better socially.
 

pdy

Junior Member
Great thread. Really makes you think a bit.

Having picked up the guitar after years of drumming, I believe my playing was enhanced by ny years of playing the drums. My ability to play a consistent and tight rhythm on the guitar is directly related to the years keeping steady time on the kit.
 

Anduin

Pioneer Member
Math. Mental math, I mean.

I can’t prove it, but it really feels like all those hours of crazy-complicated four-way coordination exercises have also trained my subconscious mind to handle numbers well. Not that I’m a brilliant mathematician or anything—far from it—but there does seem to be some level of connection between complex drumming and math.

Or maybe I’m just imagining it...
 

Drummrnj

Junior Member
I do heating and air conditioning for a living so I deal with people on a daily basis. Before I started my own company, my boss used to say everyday " aren't you glad you got this job oh, so you can play drums at night" . I seriously used to tell him, you should be glad I play the drums at night oh, so I can deal with this job during the day.

For me , Drums have always been therapy
 

dale w miller

Silver Member
I think in general it has made me a better person.

1. It made me focus and has taken my head out of the clouds.

2. It’s made me accept the things that come my way whether I want it or not. Your goals are not always in your control no matter how much you put into it.

3. It’s surrounded me with people both good and bad. I’ve had to learn from them not only what kind of person I want to be, but more than anything, what I do not want to be. Being on tour in a van will make you or break you regarding this real quick.

4. It has served my integrity well.

5. It’s assured me that doing something you love has much more value than simply working for a living and is the right way to go.

6. It’s made me recognize respect must be earned.

7........
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
It has helped me in every other instrument in terms of how I'm very intentional with every note. When I play guitar, I tend to play with a lot more confidence. Same with piano. However, the instrument it has helped with the most has been hammered dulcimer. Although I have a lot to learn, I owe any success I've had with playing drums.

It also inspires me to exercise. If I didn't play drums, I wouldn't have much inspiration to work out. Now, I have to be in shape to not only play but to lug my drums around. Now that I've hit middle age (turned 44 in November), exercise has never been more important. It's helped my playing tremendously and hauling gear. I still have back problems from time to time, but nothing like I used to 5 years ago.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Chopsticks. When my wife met me she commented on how well I use chopsticks, I didn't think much about, but said it was probably because I play drums and holding the sticks and squeezing the fingers is a similar technique.

As a programmer I occasionally have to make a series of repeated motions, I find that doing this with a rhythm passes the time more easily, and with less ergonomic strain. Though, any ergonomic benefit is probably lost, when I go home and play the drums.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Piano.
The 4 way independence developed by drumming has made me very ambidextrous. As such, I can play keys a lot better without the struggle.
 

BertTheDrummer

Gold Member
Playing drums certainly makes me a better bass player.

Also like CommanderRoss said, it makes me a better piano player as well.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
Confidence. - Being in front of a large room with the focus on me from about 14 years old. It was nothing something I enjoyed but got used too. Now it doesn't bother me in the least. Having strangers talk to you every gig has always helped as well.

Stress Management. - Nothing takes my mind off everything like drumming. I get in the zone and tune out the entire world. I have also had to deal with stressful situations at gigs, jam, with trolls online on YouTube, etc.

Limb dependence.- I agree. Motorcycle riding / Drumming both require that.

Fitness. - I play fast, heavy, loud music so my cardio from drumming is quite good actually.

Punctuality and integrity. - I have never missed a gig or been late for a gig. I like to be early to get setup and prepared. having weekly jams with 4/5 other guys keeps everyone in check.

Leadership and and compromise. - I have a leadership roll in one band and am more of a "member" in another.

Web Design. - I have made my personal and bands web pages.

Understanding music. - I appreciate and understand much more music than just the stuff I listen too. I can pick sections apart, but I am able to enjoy it more as well.

Creativity. I am a very logical thinker. Having to come up with interesting fills and listen back or solo has made me much more creative in everyday life.



There is probibly a 1000 more things I can't think of. I'd say 90% of my friends are because of being in bands from a young age. I would defiantly have a completely different life with different people in it had I never got into playing.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Swinging a hammer. Today I had to replace a front wheel bearing and hub assembly on a FWD car. The bearing was basically disintegrated. The innards fell out, and the case was rusted and fused to the spindle. I tried the bearing press/removal tool for over an hour. The old bearing case wouldn't budge. I also tried to cut it out with a hacksaw, and then a Dremel. I then tried to drill it out with M-35 Cobalt drill bits. No luck. As a last resort I grabbed a hammer. It was out in less than five minutes. Swing a hammer like a stick using Moeller (yeah, I said it). There is nothing more forceful.

Yes this thread is kinda old. And yes, I searched instead of starting a new thread. I doubt a thread about hammers and drummers would last anyhow.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Swinging a hammer. Today I had to replace a front wheel bearing and hub assembly on a FWD car. The bearing was basically disintegrated. The innards fell out, and the case was rusted and fused to the spindle. I tried the bearing press/removal tool for over an hour. The old bearing case wouldn't budge. I also tried to cut it out with a hacksaw, and then a Dremel. I then tried to drill it out with M-35 Cobalt drill bits. No luck. As a last resort I grabbed a hammer. It was out in less than five minutes. Swing a hammer like a stick using Moeller (yeah, I said it). There is nothing more forceful.

Yes this thread is kinda old. And yes, I searched instead of starting a new thread. I doubt a thread about hammers and drummers would last anyhow.
Funny, I have to use hammers quite a bit driving staples to secure wires to framing members.

Oddly enough, it's probably my least favorite part of the job.

I don't have a good explanation why either.
 
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