YOUR BETTER AT BECAUSE OF DRUMS

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Ambidexterity, I can do most daily tasks at home or work with either hand comfortably. I know this is directly related to drumming and all the silly little things I've done to free up my left hand.
 

evolving_machine

Silver Member
Before going into the US army I was very heavily into drumming. In the army my job was Morse code intercept. Learning the Morse code in the speeds slower than 18 words per minute I was listening to distinct rhythms that the letters sounded like and that let me achieve a relatively fast learning pace. But, something happened when I approached 18 wpm, the Morse code no longer sounded like rhythms and I had to approach it in a different way.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Before going into the US army I was very heavily into drumming. In the army my job was Morse code intercept. Learning the Morse code in the speeds slower than 18 words per minute I was listening to distinct rhythms that the letters sounded like and that let me achieve a relatively fast learning pace. But, something happened when I approached 18 wpm, the Morse code no longer sounded like rhythms and I had to approach it in a different way.
Ha! My first job in the Army was voice intercept. Well met, brother!
 

Icetech

Gold Member
Has helped my guitar playing a bit.. I have played for 30 years and i suck.. but now i suck with better timing (a music theory education might have helped.. too late now :)

Also helps me stay calmer and not let little shit bug me.. it's like meditation.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
If I trip on something, I rarely fall. I usually recover in spectacular fashion. Getting my weak side equal to my strong side helps me in ways that I probably don't even realize.
 

Tcat69

Junior Member
Whack-a-Mole. Not kidding...I always max out the number of times allowed to play at amusement parks/carnivals.
 

Groov-E

Silver Member
More directly, right-handed tools. Being a lefty having to learn as a right-handed player unlocked something in my brain (we were 3 drummers in school with a single kit).

I also learned to ride a dirtbike in a course shooting pacifico beer cans with a bb gun in the baja desert faster than usual according to the guys I was with...

Generally, learning the instrument helped me develop concentration and perseverance.

It takes time and dedication to learn rythms and ostinatos, so when I am confronted with complicated tasks at work I make a checklist and check every step to the end like I would learning say a jazz samba (each hand sticking, bd, hh, orchestration, tempo, etc.)

Rather than being stuck a the bottom of the Everest staring at the summit in despair, I now see a series of levels, each one a goal on its own.

Drumming has been good to me.
 

wipekitty

Junior Member
I've only been playing a short time, but listening, for sure. I can actually pick out the parts in the rhythm section, something I was not good at before.

Also, cycling. Ever try to eat food while pedaling a two-wheeled machine at 20MPH and being prepared to shift gears or brake? 4 way coordination, right there. It's also made my right leg stronger - I tend to be slightly left dominant on the bike (though I'm right handed).
 
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