YOU MUST WATCH THIS!!! if you ever wondered how bearing edge and type of wood influence the sound

ENRICO

Silver Member
these are A/B comparisons of the same shell with diferent:

bearing egde :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxL59GsyZi4

wood type:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DyhCQzCO94s&feature=related

number of plies:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUR67UBvo8g

I've always wondered why nobody've made videos like this, you see a lot of people talking about this topics , but there very few A/B comparisons.

if you want , you can tell us what's your favourite.

I like 30º bearing edge , and maple and birch, and to my surpise I really hate the bubinga
 

AJ3000

Silver Member
Very useful videos. Actually answers a question on a thread I had recently about the importance (on lack thereof) of the shell material. I think this proves very nicely it has quite a significant impact!
 
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ENRICO

Silver Member
Very useful videos. Actually answers a question on a thread I had recently about the importance (on lack thereof) of the shell material. I think this proves very nicely it has quite a significant impact!
yes, it has a significant impact , but IMO is incredible how a small change in the bearing edge make a drum sound completely different.
 

Bertram

Silver Member
Bubinga and Mahogany sounded pretty equal to me... The hybrid was the highest sounding, after that Beech, then Birch.. I liked the Maple best actually..

The bearing edge sound difference were very noticeable... With 45 edges being slightly lower in tones (to me)
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
I noticed very little (probably not noticeable at all for the casual listener) difference in the bearing edges. I have always been told that what matters is how much much wood is touching the drum head, and how far back on the drum head the bearing edge is. Not what degree the angle is. I suppose Andy will have some opinions on this!

Definitely noticed difference in the woods though, Bertram nailed it in terms on pitch. I always go for the lower ones like mahogany, bubinga, and maple!

Shell thicknesses too. The 5 + 5 was the most muted sound, probably due to the the two separate sets of plies. From the 7mm to the 10, to the 15, it just got louder and higher pitched each time. I liked the 7mm the best!

Useful videos!
 

Homeularis

Gold Member
That is a great video. When I first watched it I was thinking "ok, where are the comparisons?".
Ok, it took me a minute, but I got it. Great editing.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
A very difficult video to make. Certainly took some time & thought. No surprises there whatsoever for me, but I don't need persuading about the affects of construction changes. In the same environment, you'd notice even bigger changes between shell construction types (miltiply, stave, segmented, single ply), especially as certain woods work in harmony with a specific construction. The biggest difference of all would be noticed on an A-B video of edges, construction & wood species on toms!

As for the bearing edge change, although the description is very simplistic, the big difference between 30 degree & 45 degree is the head contact area, all other things being equal.

Nice find!
 

RobertM

Platinum Member
Excellent work, Enrico! Thanks for doing and posting these comparisons!

I like the 30 degree edges on the snare--sounds more controlled and sensitive to my ears, I think. The 45 edges seemed brighter with more bite.

On the wood, I agree with you: I did not like the bubinga shell at all--way too aggressive, far too much ringy resonance (not in a good way). I liked the birch shell the best, I think: it sounded more controlled but with still plenty of presence. The beech was bright and very distinctive.

Regarding the number of plies video, I think these comparisons of thickness offer a good observation of how resonance vs. projection changes when shell thickness increases.
 

numa_cruiser

Senior Member
Great videos, really well put together. Although I was able to pick out some interesting differences in the sound of one wood or one thickness to another, I would have found it easier to distinguish smaller nuances if the snares were all tuned to one particular tone if possible. But if shell thickness and wood type would affect a drums optimum tuning that might be like comparing apples and oranges. One snare I noticed had a much looser strainer which I knowstrainer tension can also affect overall sound.
 

LukeSnyder

Gold Member
Cool video! I would like to know how consistent tuning was achieved, however, as that would be an extremely important factor when discussing comparisons of this nature.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
Very cool! Before listening I questioned if a snare was the best drum to use in the comparisons because of all the other factors at play, but I think those differences were minimized well enough to give a pretty fair assessment of the variable in play.

To my ear the 30 degree edges win, though its surprising how many more overtones the 45 degree brings to the sound.

I really liked the birch and mahogany shells best. The beech was very different, probably the most unique in tone of all of the materials but might be a little too special for my taste. The maple and bubinga really didn't do a thing for me. Both were way too aggressive and I didn't care for the tone of the ringy-ness at all.

Similarly, I really liked the five-ply shell the most. As the shell got thicker it began sounding more ringy and bright, and lost a lot of the qualities I like in wood snares.
 

Johnka

Member
Wow, excellent videos! I would have never guessed how much impact these parameters had on the snare tone.

For me, it's 30-degrees and maple all the way.

I would love to see the same videos for drum heads.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
I noticed very little (probably not noticeable at all for the casual listener) difference in the bearing edges.
This is how I think about it as well... Although I might prefer one nuance over another when playing the snare drum by itself (in this case I liked the slightly more controlled sound of the 30 degree bearing edge), it's not something I'd ever be able to pick out in the context of a full band playing, especially not in a live situation.

The wood type was another story though, and combined with head selection and tuning the shell composition and type will definitely have a huge impact on the sound of the drum.

I would love to see the same videos for drum heads.
There are a few of those videos out there as well. Here's one example:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j20vKUY3rR8 (the music disappears halfway through)
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
This is how I think about it as well... Although I might prefer one nuance over another when playing the snare drum by itself (in this case I liked the slightly more controlled sound of the 30 degree bearing edge), it's not something I'd ever be able to pick out in the context of a full band playing, especially not in a live situation.
I'd say that any of those variables, not just the bearing edge, could be easily neutralized once a particular drum is in the hands of a particular person.

By the time someone uses the heads and tuning they're accustomed to, and perhaps puts on a Moongel and runs the resulting sound through a mic I think most of the nuances that are clearly heard in a very clinical setting would be neutralized.
 

LukeSnyder

Gold Member
I'd say that any of those variables, not just the bearing edge, could be easily neutralized once a particular drum is in the hands of a particular person.

By the time someone uses the heads and tuning they're accustomed to, and perhaps puts on a Moongel and runs the resulting sound through a mic I think most of the nuances that are clearly heard in a very clinical setting would be neutralized.
Thats been my experience, especially if there's any EQing going on!
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
I'd say that any of those variables, not just the bearing edge, could be easily neutralized once a particular drum is in the hands of a particular person.

By the time someone uses the heads and tuning they're accustomed to, and perhaps puts on a Moongel and runs the resulting sound through a mic I think most of the nuances that are clearly heard in a very clinical setting would be neutralized.
Fundamentally, they all sound like snare drums.

Now, the subtle nuances of it are all very personal. I liked the thinner-shelled drums with the thirty-degree edges but at a gig it probably wouldn't make a lot of difference. I've run boards before and the biggest differences are in tuning. If you run two identical snares at different tunings through the same board then they don't sound like the same snares at all. Run two different snares through at similar tunings and they will sound more alike - unless there are some really fundamental differences.

In a studio though, these things absolutely matter. When your sound is under the microscope like that, then it all makes a massive difference if you're going for something naturalistic; but 90% of the time it's the tuning that actually matters, not whether your snare is made of Maple or Mithril.
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
In a studio though, these things absolutely matter. When your sound is under the microscope like that, then it all makes a massive difference if you're going for something naturalistic; but 90% of the time it's the tuning that actually matters, not whether your snare is made of Maple or Mithril.
But even then, does a 45 or 30 degree really matter? There's so much software and machines you can use to change sounds now, I'm sure it would be a walk in the park to change the minute difference of a 30 degree edge to a 45 or vice versa.

There was obviously a more noticeable difference in the woods and thicknesses, but I'd say the changes you can make with software outweigh the changes in the woods.
 
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