You ever just buy new gear and get it home and you're like eh

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
One and only time I bought a cymbal unseen was an 18” A Zildjian Med ride, my friend’s sounded awesome and this was the clunky-est hunk of metal ever. Cymbals are way too variable even with modern purchase methods, I need a connection before purchasing which can really limit selections. Drums are different I feel.
Knowing the cymbal's weight might have helped you make an informed decision. If I owned a drum shop, I would gladly weigh cymbals for remote buyers. Online retailers such as Sweetwater and Musician's Friend should offer this service as well. Customer satisfaction means fewer returns. Everyone would come out winning.

Note: I know that weight alone doesn't determine a cymbal's sound, but it's a very useful metric when buying from afar.
 

prokofi5

Junior Member
A heavy neck makes the guitar point at the floor when you put it on. So as well as playing it, you must also hold it up or modify the guitar somehow.

My problem with the Floyd Rose is that it "floats" on springs. Since the bridge floats, changing the tuning of 1 string upsets the other 5. They do have fine tuners on the bridge itself, as well as the regular tuners on the headstock. A fixed bridge doesnt do this.
You just explained part of the reason I play drums. I went through a few Peaveys, Kramers, and Ibanezs with floating tremolos before I got sick messing with them. Then I got a Gibson with a tune-a-matic bridge but it was a Flying V with that massive headstock and a tree trunk neck that made it super top heavy.
 

prokofi5

Junior Member
Knowing the cymbal's weight might have helped you make an informed decision. If I owned a drum shop, I would gladly weigh cymbals for remote buyers. Online retailers such as Sweetwater and Musician's Friend should offer this service as well. Customer satisfaction means fewer returns. Everyone would come out winning.

Note: I know that weight alone doesn't determine a cymbal's sound, but it's a very useful metric when buying from afar.
Yup. Digital postal scales are cheap. I've had ride cymbals of the same size make and model 700+ grams apart so it's not a tell-all bit I'd be hard pressed to buy something without weights.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Honestly, I feel this way about virtually every purchase I make, except food. And sometimes, food. lol

I finally had to admit it's me. The bright side is, I don't really chase gear much anymore.
 
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Tamaefx

Silver Member
It happened to me with a whole kit, a second hand Tama Silverstar. I had a Superstar, 12 13 16 with deep toms. I wanted a 10 12 14 16 configuration. So I pulled the trigger on a 100% Birch Silverstar. And was disappointed by the sound compared to my former half birch Superstar. Less power, snare drum was flimsy, the kit felt, and was, much lighter. I didn’t keep this kit long. Not a bad kit at all but not what I excepted.
 

s1212z

Well-known member
Knowing the cymbal's weight might have helped you make an informed decision. If I owned a drum shop, I would gladly weigh cymbals for remote buyers. Online retailers such as Sweetwater and Musician's Friend should offer this service as well. Customer satisfaction means fewer returns. Everyone would come out winning.

Note: I know that weight alone doesn't determine a cymbal's sound, but it's a very useful metric when buying from afar.
Definitely weights are helpful. This was a while ago and I was a dummy. Had that cymbal not been stolen, it would have been a good candidate to get re-lathed. I've never tried mycymbal.com (Memphis Drum Shop), they have been doing it for while and I imagine many here have used them. I see alot of activity on flipping cymbals though so wonder what people's experience with them are.

My last cymbal purchases, I had defined weight ranges I was looking for and I was able to bring some of my own collection and put it a stand next to the ones I was interested in. This was really valuable information to make sure it was different enough but also complimented as well. Sort of a luxury for many to have a drum shop cool enough to do this and have enough selection but fortunately I have some places with a nice inventory for what I'm looking for usually. But it is nice that drum shops still have utility with great customer service and we haven't entirely been sweetwater'd though I do my fair share of online purchases, just hard to beat some conveniences. The only thing better would have a musical context in the store or to record oneself playing.
 

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
Definitely weights are helpful. This was a while ago and I was a dummy. Had that cymbal not been stolen, it would have been a good candidate to get re-lathed. I've never tried mycymbal.com (Memphis Drum Shop), they have been doing it for while and I imagine many here have used them. I see alot of activity on flipping cymbals though so wonder what people's experience with them are.

My last cymbal purchases, I had defined weight ranges I was looking for and I was able to bring some of my own collection and put it a stand next to the ones I was interested in. This was really valuable information to make sure it was different enough but also complimented as well. Sort of a luxury for many to have a drum shop cool enough to do this and have enough selection but fortunately I have some places with a nice inventory for what I'm looking for usually. But it is nice that drum shops still have utility with great customer service and we haven't entirely been sweetwater'd though I do my fair share of online purchases, just hard to beat some conveniences. The only thing better would have a musical context in the store or to record oneself playing.
Yea, I mean. I do a lot of research on the web, and have gone to the store to hear them in person. I wrote down all the different weight ranges in and a spreadsheet to determine what I was going after.

I thought being lighter than the sig med, it would be a nice sounding ride. It still is a nice sounding ride, I think it will serve me well doing heavier rock music. Maybe with a piece of gaf tape underneath to control the wash.

I'll keep the sig for my lower volume cover bands going against 212s and then have the 30th for the bands with more volume I guess. I have 30 days to decide if I'll return it. So we'll see.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
I find that context plays a huge part. Sometimes, I buy a cymbal and think it sounds great at my house, and then it doesn’t sound as good at one gig, but it will sound good at another.

I bought a Meinl Sand Ride, having wanted one forever. It sounded great in the parking lot that I met the seller at. I took it home and was completely underwhelmed. I held onto it for a couple of months. I had a musical come up where there was a specific ride sound I was looking for, and none of my go to rides were doing it. I brought the Sand Ride and put it on the stand, and it was perfect.

So, yeah, context is everything.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I find that context plays a huge part.
Massive for sure. We have a stubborn tendency to isolate sounds when researching or testing gear, but unless we play nothing but solos, our equipment won't be heard independently of other instruments. Much of what we like (or dislike) about a drum or cymbal is inevitably altered in the mix. We spend too much time wringing our hands over sonic intricacies We'd be better off just playing.
 
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jimb

Member
Apparently paiste 2002's are dyed in the wool all the same....eh, nope....Bought a used 2002 18" crash online in mint condition...my 505 crash really put it to shame....Against the 2002's heavy dullness the 505 sounded crystalline...brilliant cymbal.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
Knowing the cymbal's weight might have helped you make an informed decision. If I owned a drum shop, I would gladly weigh cymbals for remote buyers. Online retailers such as Sweetwater and Musician's Friend should offer this service as well. Customer satisfaction means fewer returns. Everyone would come out winning.

Note: I know that weight alone doesn't determine a cymbal's sound, but it's a very useful metric when buying from afar.
This is very true @C.M. Jones, especially if one knows the weight of the desired cymbal size/model trying to replicate.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
This is very true @C.M. Jones, especially if one knows the weight of the desired cymbal size/model trying to replicate.
And given the nature of hand lathed cymbals, it is surprising that more retailers do not include weight on each listing. Too much trouble to stick it on a scale?
 

iCe

Senior Member
I've always wanted a Zildjian Oriental Classic china, but they have been discontinued for a long time. Couldn't find one, but was drooling over YouTube videos etc.
Years ago eventually spotted a 20" on a used gear site and immediately bought it. When i got it, i tapped on it and still remember thinking 'this is not a trashy china'. Took it with me to rehearsal and immediately regretted it; lots of 'clang' and 'gong', but not the trashiness i was hoping for. Never thought about sending it back. Haven't sold it either, think because with mallets it has a nice buildup and can be used as a trashy gong. If i ever need it hehe
 
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