Yamaha EAD10 Module Questions

fl.tom

Senior Member
Im for sure it’s A. I tried B first and it got nothing but silence, and I made sure to double check the cable and the inputs on the mic. I bought it in the US and I read the manual that said it should be B, so I was surprised too
Ok, mine is US too and thought if you were in the UK it might be different, but both manuals show B. Also, A is the trigger and B the mic on the main unit so definitely surprising...
I’m going to open my sensor unit and take some voltage checks on both lines to and from the main unit later this week and will report back.
As for phantom power, I’m not sure. I have a very cheap “powered mixer” which means it is usually designed to power speakers that don’t have their own power source. I don’t have any button or switch or anything that tells me if phantom power is turned on or off, so I don’t know. But from what I can tell, it seems to work just like any regular mic, and it was actually pretty simple once I tried it out
Exactly, powered here usually means amplified speaker outputs. If you have the make and model, I‘ll be happy to double check the specs. No worries if not, I’ll run some tests and let you guys know.
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
Exactly, powered here usually means amplified speaker outputs. If you have the make and model, I‘ll be happy to double check the specs. No worries if not, I’ll run some tests and let you guys know.
I use 2 Harbinger HA120 120 watt 4 channel mixers. Super cheap and pretty old but they work out pretty well
 

fl.tom

Senior Member
I use 2 Harbinger HA120 120 watt 4 channel mixers. Super cheap and pretty old but they work out pretty well
Thank you sir. Just looked at the manual and there’s no sign of phantom power in the mic preamp description, specs or block diagram. Straightforward balanced mono circuit with no input gain or pad adjustments. Kept it simple, nothing wrong with that.
 

fl.tom

Senior Member
**************
>> NOTE >>
The following information is intended solely for the purpose of better understanding the configuration and operation of the EAD10 microphones. Absolutely no recommendation or encouragement is being made (implied or otherwise) to use the main or sensor units outside the configuration specified in Yamaha’s manuals. Any use of this information for any other purposes is done so at an individual’s own risk and responsibility.
<<<<<<<<<<

TLDR SUMMARY
Based on testing below, the key findings are:
— The MAIN UNIT outputs a continual 12VDC on mic input jack “B“. 12V is provided across both audio high & ground as well as audio low & ground. Given these alone, the powering is -likely- compliant with the P12 Phantom Power specification.
— The MAIN UNIT does not output any voltage on trigger input jack “A”.
— The SENSOR UNIT must receive 12VDC on output jack “B” in order for the mics to operate.

So if the above are true, how was the OP able get audio from an acoustic kit with only the sensor unit “A” output connected to a PA and without 12V phantom power to the sensor unit “B” output? (i.e. two things that disagree with above).

Answer: The piezo trigger. Piezo transducers can pickup sound (pressure level differences) and serve as mics. Usually the audio quality is mediocre, but this one is decent.

Need more proof? See additional details below...

MAIN UNIT
Powered on with A & B input cables connected, but disconnected from sensor unit...
Jack A input (trigger):
— 0V output on T-S (Tip to Sleeve; hot to gnd)
— 0V output on R-S (Ring-Sleeve; cold-gnd)
— 0V output on T-R (Tip to Ring; hot to cold)
Jack B input (mics):
— 12V output on T-S
— 12V output on R-S
— 0V output on T-R

Given the above, the main unit is -likely- providing P12 compliant Phantom Power (as defined by IEC 61938) to the sensor unit mics. (Note: IEC 61938 also includes the P24 and P48 variants, the latter being the 48V standard most widely in use at the present time.)

To confirm it is -definitely- Phantom Power compliant would require a schematic of the main unit interface. The level of integration is too high for visual inspection. For certain, it is definitely NOT an alternative powering scheme (e.g. T-Powering) that puts voltage across the audio lines instead of to ground.

SENSOR UNIT (with cover removed)
Physical inspection...
— Jack A output is connected to one side of a connector interface board; removable cable behind jack is connected to piezo BD trigger on back of sensor unit.
— Jack B output is connected to other side of interface board; removable cable behind jack is connected to a microphone driver board on front of sensor unit.
— Above microphone board, two thin wafer mics are mounted 90 deg from each other and each 45 deg from vertical center. Each is encased in rubber grommets that slide into a metal Y frame. No part numbers are visible on mic capsules, but appear to be electret condensers.

When connected to MAIN UNIT which is connected to a powered speaker...
— 5V is present at each mic input.
— Speaking into mics and “tapping” on back of piezo are both audible through speaker.

When disconnected from MAIN UNIT and only B output connected to powered speaker...
— 0V is present at each mic input.
— No audible output from either mics or piezo.

When disconnected from MAIN UNIT and only A output connected to powered speaker...
— 0V is present at each mic input.
— No audible output from mics.
— Tapping (more so) on and speaking (less so) to piezo are both audible.


**************
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
If you wanna trigger cool drums sounds in a live setting, and shred while doing so, with the shortest latency on earth, you need one of these. It provides the easiest, fastest load-in/load-out on the planet.

 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
**************
>> NOTE >>
The following information is intended solely for the purpose of better understanding the configuration and operation of the EAD10 microphones. Absolutely no recommendation or encouragement is being made (implied or otherwise) to use the main or sensor units outside the configuration specified in Yamaha’s manuals. Any use of this information for any other purposes is done so at an individual’s own risk and responsibility.
<<<<<<<<<<

TLDR SUMMARY
Based on testing below, the key findings are:
— The MAIN UNIT outputs a continual 12VDC on mic input jack “B“. 12V is provided across both audio high & ground as well as audio low & ground. Given these alone, the powering is -likely- compliant with the P12 Phantom Power specification.
— The MAIN UNIT does not output any voltage on trigger input jack “A”.
— The SENSOR UNIT must receive 12VDC on output jack “B” in order for the mics to operate.

So if the above are true, how was the OP able get audio from an acoustic kit with only the sensor unit “A” output connected to a PA and without 12V phantom power to the sensor unit “B” output? (i.e. two things that disagree with above).

Answer: The piezo trigger. Piezo transducers can pickup sound (pressure level differences) and serve as mics. Usually the audio quality is mediocre, but this one is decent.

Need more proof? See additional details below...

MAIN UNIT
Powered on with A & B input cables connected, but disconnected from sensor unit...
Jack A input (trigger):
— 0V output on T-S (Tip to Sleeve; hot to gnd)
— 0V output on R-S (Ring-Sleeve; cold-gnd)
— 0V output on T-R (Tip to Ring; hot to cold)
Jack B input (mics):
— 12V output on T-S
— 12V output on R-S
— 0V output on T-R

Given the above, the main unit is -likely- providing P12 compliant Phantom Power (as defined by IEC 61938) to the sensor unit mics. (Note: IEC 61938 also includes the P24 and P48 variants, the latter being the 48V standard most widely in use at the present time.)

To confirm it is -definitely- Phantom Power compliant would require a schematic of the main unit interface. The level of integration is too high for visual inspection. For certain, it is definitely NOT an alternative powering scheme (e.g. T-Powering) that puts voltage across the audio lines instead of to ground.

SENSOR UNIT (with cover removed)
Physical inspection...
— Jack A output is connected to one side of a connector interface board; removable cable behind jack is connected to piezo BD trigger on back of sensor unit.
— Jack B output is connected to other side of interface board; removable cable behind jack is connected to a microphone driver board on front of sensor unit.
— Above microphone board, two thin wafer mics are mounted 90 deg from each other and each 45 deg from vertical center. Each is encased in rubber grommets that slide into a metal Y frame. No part numbers are visible on mic capsules, but appear to be electret condensers.

When connected to MAIN UNIT which is connected to a powered speaker...
— 5V is present at each mic input.
— Speaking into mics and “tapping” on back of piezo are both audible through speaker.

When disconnected from MAIN UNIT and only B output connected to powered speaker...
— 0V is present at each mic input.
— No audible output from either mics or piezo.

When disconnected from MAIN UNIT and only A output connected to powered speaker...
— 0V is present at each mic input.
— No audible output from mics.
— Tapping (more so) on and speaking (less so) to piezo are both audible.


**************
That's very helpful. I definitely thought the sound quality wasn't the same and now I guess I know why. So are you saying right now there's no real way to play the mic without the module it came with?
 

fl.tom

Senior Member
That's very helpful. I definitely thought the sound quality wasn't the same and now I guess I know why.
Good to hear. And thank you very much for giving me something interesting to do.

So are you saying right now there's no real way to play the mic without the module it came with?
I specifically didn’t say “how” to use the mics without the main unit/module because I wanted people to consider their options carefully. Factors like warranty, level of expertise, etc. should be assessed individually. I definitely don’t want anyone blowing up their sensor unit and thinking, “Man, that jerk on DW cost me $500 with his suggestion.” Having said this, the answer is in the post. :cool:
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
Firmware update:
 

Petoli100

New member
Thank you very much fl.tom for the research.

So: can it? : Do not use the Yamaha sensor that is placed in acoustic kick. Put two triggers of another brand, with a double adapter, at the A input of the Yamaha brain. And the EAD10 microphone at the B input of the brain. Would it work? Or do you have to use the factory settings to activate everything? Thanks
 
Last edited:

Petoli100

New member
That is, use only the sensor microphone (a cable from B of the sensor to B of the brain), and at the input A of the brain put two kick triggers of another brand. Possible?
 

fl.tom

Senior Member
So your desired configuration would be:

Sensor output B -> Main input B
Sensor output A -> (disconnected)
(2) kick triggers -> Y cable -> Main input A

If so, yes, this configuration is viable. Just ensure your other brand kick triggers are compatible and use a 2-TS to 1-TRS (2-mono to 1-stereo) Y cable to minimize problems.

And just checked, this is covered in the owner’s manual... page 16* for connecting and page 48* for trigger types.

* printed page numbers (not PDF page numbers)
 
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