Yamaha EAD10 Module Questions

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
I was wondering, could I plug any microphone into the module and would it work? And could I use the ead10 microphone with a different audio source than the ead10 module? For example, could I plug a hi hat microphone into the ead10 modules mic input? And could I plug the ead10s microphone into a mixer or audio interface or some other device?

I don’t see why it wouldn’t work, but I don’t have enough resources around to test it
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
I was wondering, could I plug any microphone into the module and would it work?
No, there is no microphone input, just trigger input.
Trigger signals are received via the trigger input jacks. These are used for connecting separately sold accessories to the
EAD10. You can connect up to six pads or drum triggers.
You can definitely take the stereo outputs to a mixer or the USB to connect to a computer DAW.
Connecting a Computer
If you have a computer and DAW software, connect the Main Unit to the computer and you can record your performance
and listen to the playback from the computer.

Connecting the Main Unit to a computer using a USB cable lets you send and receive audio or MIDI data.
To use audio data with a Windows computer, you need to install the Yamaha Steinberg USB Driver.
When you use a macOS computer or when you use a Windows computer only to handle MIDI data, installation of the Yamaha Steinberg USB
Driver is not required.

USB audio and the recorder function cannot be used simultaneously on the EAD10.
The factory default setting automatically switches to handle only MIDI over USB while the recorder is in use.
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
No, there is no microphone input, just trigger input.
The condenser microphone included with the module has a trigger in the same housing, and has two inputs labeled A and B. And the module has the same two inputs that you connect with two 1/4 cables. I always assumed that one of the inputs was for the trigger and one for the mic. But to be honest I don’t really know. I like the device the way it’s supposed to be set up, I just want to know what all I can get away with
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Well .... I think you're right williamsbclontz. Being Yamaha calls the Mic/Trigger sensor a Mic/Trigger sensor ..... I'll assume that the Mic side of the unit is just that, and should behave somewhat like a microphone. I the spec. sheet , the Mic side is listed as a stereo phone jack ..... while the Trigger side is listed as a standard mono jack. However, looking at my unit, both appear to be stereo jacks. So, perhaps the trigger side is wired in mono, while the mic is wired in stereo. If you're gonna plug another mic into it .... it also might have to be a stereo unit. Likewise .... plugging it into a mixer might not work so well if the mixer has mono inputs. I've used stereo cables with mono jacks ..... and sometimes they work and sometimes they don't.
 
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notvinnie

Senior Member
Input "B"
That is for the sensor that mounts onto the bass drum. The sensor has a stereo microphone which you can adjust a bit via the unit, but it's really designed to be pretty static. It works well in standard setups, although if you use two floor toms, the last tom won't get picked up very well. If you want to use more microphones, this is not the device you should be using. The whole idea behind the EAD-10 is simplicity and quick setup, with the ability to extend it with pads.

I don't know if the stereo mic on the sensor is dynamic or condenser, but it works quite well. If it's a condenser it will be much more susceptible to damage since they're generally more fragile.
 
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fl.tom

Senior Member
The mics in the sensor unit are a pair of high SPL condensers in XY config, and plug into the TRS/stereo jack labeled “B” on the main unit (as others have noted).

Given the limited specs Yamaha has publicly published for both units, it would take some experimentation to best answer the OP’s questions.

But my first question would be what are the motivations for the alternate mic setups?

Routing a single condenser mic to the main unit for just hi-hat coverage wouldn’t take full advantage of that interface, and routing the sensor unit mic pair to an outboard mixer would lose integrated DSP processing and potentially stereo imaging.

Is the main motivation to separate the trigged and mic audio outputs for better FOH control in live use?
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
But my first question would be what are the motivations for the alternate mic setups?

Routing a single condenser mic to the main unit for just hi-hat coverage wouldn’t take full advantage of that interface, and routing the sensor unit mic pair to an outboard mixer would lose integrated DSP processing and potentially stereo imaging.

Is the main motivation to separate the trigged and mic audio outputs for better FOH control in live use?
So the reasoning behind all this is...

I love the ead10, but I never use the the microphone effects built into the software of the module. And right now I’m currently just using the device as an electronic drum module for trigger pads, so I’m not even using the mic

I have another acoustic kit that I practice with, and i have it fully miced, but my overheads are pretty cheap and I’d like to replace them. But I got an idea one day that I could just use the ead10 to replace the overheads, because it sounds so good. I’d just love to be able to plug that in to a mixer with my tom, bass and snare mics to get a really full sound while I practice

The ead10 module that I’m using with electronic triggers is in a separate location. So I’d really like to use both of them separately. So I guess my main question is, how do I use the mic without the module, if that’s possible

If I can’t, I’ll make do with my current setup. I just already have all of this stuff laying around and I’d like to use what I’ve got on hand. (And I don’t plan on using any of this for live gigging or serious recording)
 

fl.tom

Senior Member
Thanks for the clarification. The sensor unit has both the mic pair and a kick trigger so please make sure I understand your setup correctly...

- On the trigger pad kit, you are only using the main unit (module) with an external kick trigger (i.e. not the one in the sensor unit), correct?

AND

- On the acoustic kit, you would like to use the sensor unit for just the condenser mics (i.e. the kick trigger won’t be connected), correct?

If I got that right, at least the following need to be addressed:

1. How do the condenser mics in the sensor unit receive phantom power? Given no internal batteries are mentioned, probably via TRS wiring (alternative to default XLR standard). This will drive what adapter cables are needed to interface with your mixer,

2. Is the mic output signal (B) of the sensor unit indeed at Mic level? Yamaha refers to it as an audio signal and here it’s likely not proprietary, but the devil’s in the details. If your mixer has manual input channel settings for Line, Instr and Mic, start with Line (highest input level) and input gain/trim at the lowest setting to begin testing.

3. Does your mixer accept a stereo signal on any of the input channels? If not, a splitter cable will need to be used to send each mic signal into a separate channel.

Yamaha may also be leveraging signal processing in the main unit (now out of the loop) to further balance/filter the mics, but this should become clear in testing with your external mixer/PA.

If you don’t feel comfortable doing any of this, I will try to do it later this week. I’m still prepping for the storm about to hit the US east coast and my EAD10 is at currently another location.
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
How do the condenser mics in the sensor unit receive phantom power?
I'm still not convinced that they're condenser mics. They probably are, but it's not specified in the manual. A dynamic would be less fragile, but a condenser would be more apt to pick up off axis sounds.
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
I'm still not convinced that they're condenser mics. They probably are, but it's not specified in the manual. A dynamic would be less fragile, but a condenser would be more apt to pick up off axis sounds.
Yea I’m not sure I was just assuming they were condenser mics. They could be anything

Thanks for the clarification. The sensor unit has both the mic pair and a kick trigger so please make sure I understand your setup correctly...
I’ll look at my mixer board today and try to post specs and stuff. I have a feeling that I’ll have to invest in some sort of di box or something to balance the signal (or unbalance the signal? I’m not good with this tech stuff). At the very least I’ll have to buy some adaptors for the 1/4 cable
 

fl.tom

Senior Member
I'm still not convinced that they're condenser mics. They probably are, but it's not specified in the manual. A dynamic would be less fragile, but a condenser would be more apt to pick up off axis sounds.
Yep, very little engineering details are specified in either manual (owners or reference), and what I noted is what Yamaha stated at NAMM so it’s not speculation either. Nonetheless, further testing is needed to confirm.
I’ll look at my mixer board today and try to post specs and stuff. I have a feeling that I’ll have to invest in some sort of di box or something to balance the signal (or unbalance the signal? I’m not good with this tech stuff). At the very least I’ll have to buy some adaptors for the 1/4 cable
This will be more about preserving the stereo XY image and the path for phantom power (if needed) than a balanced vs unbalanced signal for noise cancellation... presuming you’re acoustic kit is in close proximity to your mixer.

Did I understand your planned use for the sensor unit correctly?
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
Did I understand your planned use for the sensor unit correctly?
Yea you got it spot on. I’m using the module with a snare, bass, hi hat trigger for a small quiet practice kit I can play in the apartment. And the acoustic kit is in a garage a few miles away that I own. I just want the mic, not using the built in trigger. And the 8 channel mixer is right next to the kit, about arms length away. I’ll take a picture of it when I go out there tonight, and try to look up specs

Thanks everyone for yalls help. I know this is a really complicated thread
 

fl.tom

Senior Member
Yea you got it spot on. I’m using the module with a snare, bass, hi hat trigger for a small quiet practice kit I can play in the apartment. And the acoustic kit is in a garage a few miles away that I own. I just want the mic, not using the built in trigger. And the 8 channel mixer is right next to the kit, about arms length away. I’ll take a picture of it when I go out there tonight, and try to look up specs
Great, just wanted to ensure I didn’t misinterpret anything. If you know the make and model of your mixer, be glad to help you verify functionality.
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
I bit the bullet and went down to the local music shop, bought a xlr to 1/4 adaptor, and plugged it into the mixer. It works great and I had no problems. The signal even sounds a little cleaner and now I can eq the mic! Thanks everyone for the help I do appreciate it. This forum always proves to be a great resource
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
Also, the mic cable is input A. The trigger is input B

The mic is balanced

And if you do decide to run it into a different audio source watch out for the volumes, because this thing can get pretty hot. I think if I ran the volume past halfway it might blow out my in-ears

Hope this helps someone
 

fl.tom

Senior Member
I bit the bullet and went down to the local music shop, bought a xlr to 1/4 adaptor, and plugged it into the mixer. It works great and I had no problems. The signal even sounds a little cleaner and now I can eq the mic! Thanks everyone for the help I do appreciate it. This forum always proves to be a great resource
Good to hear. Nice work!

Did you have to enable phantom power on that channel?
Also, the mic cable is input A. The trigger is input B
Could the A cable have been plugged into the B jack?

I picked up mine last night and it’s the opposite like the manual shows... at least for the US and UK. Interesting...
The mic is balanced
Mics are typically balanced... or better worded, use a balanced circuit/line.

We were mainly trying to confirm if the mics were condenser or dynamic. If the product manager was correct, I suspect they’re electret condensers and may have a soldered-in battery backup in the unit.

I’m going to still try to do some testing with mine this week to give you guys some additional details.
And if you do decide to run it into a different audio source watch out for the volumes, because this thing can get pretty hot. I think if I ran the volume past halfway it might blow out my in-ears

Hope this helps someone
If it helps, lowering the gain/trim knob or engaging any pad button (e.g. -20 dB) on the channel can be used to manage hot input signals.

Thank you for all the info. Please let us know about the phantom power and A vs B jack.
 

williamsbclontz

Silver Member
Thank you for all the info. Please let us know about the phantom power and A vs B jack.
Im for sure it’s A. I tried B first and it got nothing but silence, and I made sure to double check the cable and the inputs on the mic. I bought it in the US and I read the manual that said it should be B, so I was surprised too

As for phantom power, I’m not sure. I have a very cheap “powered mixer” which means it is usually designed to power speakers that don’t have their own power source. I don’t have any button or switch or anything that tells me if phantom power is turned on or off, so I don’t know. But from what I can tell, it seems to work just like any regular mic, and it was actually pretty simple once I tried it out
 
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