Worth the price?

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Ok, to sort of piggy back on one of my other threads regarding drumming as I'm getting older, here's the deal.

The band I'm with is starting to get gigs, which is a great thing. Right now, I have three different drum sets (one of which stays at church). The two that I have right now are both the same configs: 22 x 16 kick, 12 x 10 rack tom, 16 x 16 rack tom, 14 x 6 snare. I have hard cases for everything.

When I was in my early 20s, it was nothing to carry these things around. Now? I hate picking up my big ol' 22 kick drum hard case due to my back issues. Instead of this current set up, I've been really tempted to try to get another set of drum, preferably maple shells in a 20 kick, 14 floor, 10 rack set up with gig bags as opposed to hard cases.

Anyone gone the smaller drum route? Suggestions? Is all of this worth the price?
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Soft cases are the way forward if you're only carrying your kit around in a car. If you're anything like me you'll pack them in so they wont get damaged.

I wouldn't sell the kit, just case it in soft cases with handles.

The size of a drum doesn't necessarily mean it will be lighter than what you have already. The heaviest drum I ever owned was a 22x14 80's Tama Superstar bass drum, weighed a tonne, on the other side on of the lightest drums I ever owned was a 26x20 bass drum. Both were high end Birch.
 

tcspears

Gold Member
I used to have a 22" BD, but I've used an 18 for the past couple of years and love it. I mostly play jazz, so YMMV, but I love the smaller size. I tune mine pretty low for jazz, and can play rockabilly and some hard swing on it and it sounds nice, has a great thud to it.
 

myxtc

Member
If both kits are the same sizes then I think trading one for a fusion size kit is a good thing. I had a 20" kick not too long ago and although it was punchy the weight was still up there. Mine was a 20 x 18 so I recommend at the most a 20 x 16, However wood type and ply's make a huge difference as well.

If you can find nice mahogany kit I would go with that, the lightest kick I ever had was an old 22 x 16 Gretsch and it sounded fantastic. I really regret letting that one go. Most weight issues are going to come down to ply thickness and total # of ply's though. I have had some really light Maple kits and some real heavy ones as well.
 

Pyromaniac777

Silver Member
Ok, to sort of piggy back on one of my other threads regarding drumming as I'm getting older, here's the deal.

The band I'm with is starting to get gigs, which is a great thing. Right now, I have three different drum sets (one of which stays at church). The two that I have right now are both the same configs: 22 x 16 kick, 12 x 10 rack tom, 16 x 16 rack tom, 14 x 6 snare. I have hard cases for everything.

When I was in my early 20s, it was nothing to carry these things around. Now? I hate picking up my big ol' 22 kick drum hard case due to my back issues. Instead of this current set up, I've been really tempted to try to get another set of drum, preferably maple shells in a 20 kick, 14 floor, 10 rack set up with gig bags as opposed to hard cases.

Anyone gone the smaller drum route? Suggestions? Is all of this worth the price?
Try a Ludwig Signet drum set. I've heard they're very light and sound great
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Thanks for the quick replies everyone.

I think that the reason why I'm a little gun-shy about the whole thing is that I had a Sonor Bop kit for about 6 months before I traded it for a set of Pearl Sessions (the ones I have now). I didn't like the sound of the snare or the kick (18" diameter) with that kit, but I think that it was due to the wood (it was made of basswood). The snare was just awful no matter what I did to it. I think that there would be a lot of difference between a Sonor Bop kit and say a DW Frequent Flyer kit. Behind the kit, it sounded bad. In front of the kit (about 10 feet out) it sounded great; however, I just couldn't get used to it at all sitting behind it.

Thanks again.
 

myxtc

Member
I didn't like the sound of the snare or the kick (18" diameter) with that kit, but I think that it was due to the wood (it was made of basswood). .
Basswood sux IMO, even kits with a mix of maple or birch and basswood suck. I have heard just about every other type of wood out there and although I like some better than others Basswood is the only one I would not want to play at all.
 

wallflood

Member
A lot of the cats around here are playing 16" bass drums. They're mostly the newer, younger jazz types but they're playing some harder hitting stuff. Many of them are gretsch if that makes a difference. I'm playing an old tama 22" which weighs a ton.

I'm def going no bigger than 18" myself for playing out. With the right head, tuning, and a mic you could play just about anything within reason
 

john gerrard

Senior Member
I agree with your idea about going with a 20 kick ( i really like 20x16) and a 14x14 floor tom, but I think a 12 mounted tom would be more versatile. Another way that I lightened up my load was to find some lighter stands. Some of these heavy duty cymbal stands weigh a ton each and there is no way that a normal player needs anything that heavy to mount a cymbal. Now if you mount your toms on stands that is a different story. Good luck.
 
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