Worst idea in Drumming

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Remember the Vic Firth "Dave Weckl" drumming shoes? I mean really?
This has got to be a winner.......I've never heard of 'drumming shoes'....Weckl or otherwise.

"Really?" indeed Muckster. If ever there was a thing that didn't need to be invented, let alone sold, we have just found it!
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Like Al, I have no idea what became of my rotos. I guess they went to the same place as missing pens, books and umbrellas.
I know where my Rotos went. I threw them into the metal recycle dumpster at work about two years ago after not having played them for about 25 years! I didn't even have the heart to sell them to anyone!
 

con struct

Platinum Member
Regarding the "floor toms have to have legs" issue, I don't agree. For the past eighteen years I've been hanging my big tom from my ride cymbal stand and everything's fine. Why should it wobble or shake? Mine doesn't. Okay, it's just a 13" x 13" so maybe that's why. Probably it's only good for smaller drums. If you're using an 18" floor tom I guess it might be dodgy.

The thing that's good about it is that my drums are always set up exactly the same way every time. I just hook them together and there you are. Both of my toms are suspended with iso-mounts and they both hang from my cymbal stands. I take them out of their cases, hook them up and I'm done.

Memory locks, one of the greatest inventions in drums ever!

My vote for the worst idea still goes to the drum frame.
 

JT1

Silver Member
Regarding the "floor toms have to have legs" issue, I don't agree. For the past eighteen years I've been hanging my big tom from my ride cymbal stand and everything's fine. Why should it wobble or shake? Mine doesn't. Okay, it's just a 13" x 13" so maybe that's why. Probably it's only good for smaller drums. If you're using an 18" floor tom I guess it might be dodgy.

The thing that's good about it is that my drums are always set up exactly the same way every time. I just hook them together and there you are. Both of my toms are suspended with iso-mounts and they both hang from my cymbal stands. I take them out of their cases, hook them up and I'm done.

Memory locks, one of the greatest inventions in drums ever!

My vote for the worst idea still goes to the drum frame.
Well Jay I'm pretty certain that a lot of drummers would tell you their experience of wobbling mounted floor toms. Even if it's not a big wobble they will still wobble as there is nothing cementing them to the ground directly other than the stand legs. Fair enough I believe that the way you have your cymbal stand set will affect it and you can probably eliminate most of the wobble but it will still never be as sturdy and rock solid as a stand alone floor tom.

Wow that really is a small floor tom too yeah I would say that is the reason. The more weight you add to a stand the more unstable it becomes It also comes down to how hard you hit. Because you're a jazz player you probably don't hit too hard as your music does not require it and therefore it won't bounce as much.

Now I do like the idea of mounted floor toms as you can position them closer to you without the feet getting in the way and they are usually a lot easier to pack as Polly stated.

If there was a really short version of a snare stand designed specifically for mounting mounted floor toms, now that may be worth a look.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Now I do like the idea of mounted floor toms
Is a floor tom still a floor tom if it's not on the floor?

If a tree falls in the forest and there's nobody there to hear what sound does it make?

Glasshopper, when you can answer these questions you will be ready, my son.

Still reeling from Bob's comment about his poor roto toms.
 

JT1

Silver Member
Is a floor tom still a floor tom if it's not on the floor?

If a tree falls in the forest and there's nobody there to hear what sound does it make?

Glasshopper, when you can answer these questions you will be ready, my son.

Still reeling from Bob's comment about his poor roto toms.
Haha Poll is in philosophy mood. Yeah I actually said the exact same thing when I started posting about floor toms earlier in this thread.
 
P

PermaNoob

Guest
What's wrong with that bass drum? Is that a Salvador Dali painting?
OMG - I was thinking the exact same thing
somewhere between the "persistenc of memory" floppy clocks and "atmospheric skull sodomizing grand piano"
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Well Jay I'm pretty certain that a lot of drummers would tell you their experience of wobbling mounted floor toms. Even if it's not a big wobble they will still wobble as there is nothing cementing them to the ground directly other than the stand legs. Fair enough I believe that the way you have your cymbal stand set will affect it and you can probably eliminate most of the wobble but it will still never be as sturdy and rock solid as a stand alone floor tom.

Wow that really is a small floor tom too yeah I would say that is the reason. The more weight you add to a stand the more unstable it becomes It also comes down to how hard you hit. Because you're a jazz player you probably don't hit too hard as your music does not require it and therefore it won't bounce as much.

Now I do like the idea of mounted floor toms as you can position them closer to you without the feet getting in the way and they are usually a lot easier to pack as Polly stated.

If there was a really short version of a snare stand designed specifically for mounting mounted floor toms, now that may be worth a look.
My floor tom is 14 by 14, solid half-inch-thick ironwood and it is suspended with Gauger mounts. It weighs more than most bass drums so yes, it wobbles. My cymbals wobble a lot when I hit them, a lot more than my floor tom, and I managed to get used to it. Maybe some people can't stand their cymbals wobbling either. I am using DW 9000 hardware so there are no real concerns about failure. I also like having fewer points of contact on the floor.

I like my floor tom mounted high, as though it were a rack tom. I see no need to distinguish. Toms is toms. Plus as mentioned before, I like the exact positioning I get with the mounting hardware.
 

Zumba_Zumba

Senior Member
There were two bass drum pedals, to take advantage of different tunings.

Trixon were far out drums and I would love to have a set. Those are highly collectible.
I forgot about the side by side single bass pedals. So true. They are highly collectible and I was wondering if I should put them as a bad idea. I wonder how they sounded.

Although I love the guy, Neil Peart's playing butt-end of sticks come to mind. I admit, I played like that for a while, great response from the ride (sarcasm). I also write this to get a rise out of Michael Drums. He was noticibly absent from the last activity session at NP's thread.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
Although I love the guy, Neil Peart's playing butt-end of sticks come to mind. I admit, I played like that for a while, great response from the ride (sarcasm).
Neil Peart wasn't the first or only drummer to play butt-ends as a matter of preference. I play butt-ends about half the time with 7As because I like having the weight out at the end of the stick and I think it helps with dynamic consistency - like timbale sticks.

You're right, though; you have to be careful with the ride cymbal because it can get out of hand in a hurry. You actually have to pick a ride cymbal with butt-end playing in mind (or just never leave the bell). I can play my 22" 2oo2 Ride anywhere from bell to edge of bow and keep it under control.

Not for everyone, but not high on my list of worst ideas. I think 18" and deeper bass drums are worse.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
Deep drum=deep sound.
Shallow drum=shallow sound.
Yeah, I get that, and I was never a hater of deep toms (I actually like them except for their difficult placement), but I just had my 22x18 shortened by 4 inches a couple months ago and it's like a weight has been lifted. It's so much easier to hear it now.

If want a bigger sound, I'd rather go with a larger diameter than a longer tube. I think I might not like deep sounds on a kick.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Neil Peart wasn't the first or only drummer to play butt-ends as a matter of preference. I play butt-ends about half the time with 7As because I like having the weight out at the end of the stick and I think it helps with dynamic consistency - like timbale sticks.

You're right, though; you have to be careful with the ride cymbal because it can get out of hand in a hurry. You actually have to pick a ride cymbal with butt-end playing in mind (or just never leave the bell). I can play my 22" 2oo2 Ride anywhere from bell to edge of bow and keep it under control.

Not for everyone, but not high on my list of worst ideas. I think 18" and deeper bass drums are worse.
In the 80s there were times when I had to use the butt end of 5Bs to get enough volume. I had a 22" 2oo2 ride as well, not for that purpose, just that I liked it. I still much prefer the stick tip sound but when the music is loud enough to warrant butt end playing it doesn't matter as much :)

Deathmetalconga said:
My floor tom is 14 by 14, solid half-inch-thick ironwood and it is suspended with Gauger mounts. It weighs more than most bass drums so yes, it wobbles. My cymbals wobble a lot when I hit them, a lot more than my floor tom, and I managed to get used to it.
DMC, you know I love your kit but I agree with JT that a wobbling drum isn't ideal - in your words, it's something to get used to. Also, I find it impossible to imagine a musician as organised as you having fittings and stands that weren't high enough quality to cope with the drum's weight. And the cymbal analogy was a bit cheeky :)

I agree that the Trixons were cool things.
 

Vipercussionist

Silver Member
how many millions are spent trying to create a better tom mount, but the poor bass drum - clamp a pedal on the wood hoop and drop it on the floor - we got to the moon, cant we think of a better way to attach the pedal to a bass drum???
There IS a better method, the Rogers Swivomatic (Buddy Rich's favorite) pedal and clamp, however no one has taken the idea to THIS century. so it remains a piece of history without interest to modern drumming.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
DMC, you know I love your kit but I agree with JT that a wobbling drum isn't ideal - in your words, it's something to get used to. Also, I find it impossible to imagine a musician as organised as you having fittings and stands that weren't high enough quality to cope with the drum's weight. And the cymbal analogy was a bit cheeky :)

I agree that the Trixons were cool things.
A drumset involves hitting things with sticks or your hands, sometimes hard. Wobble is part of it. All parts of the set wobble to some degree. If I played violin, any wobble above the microscopic level would be a problem. I have never, ever had a problem with cymbals or toms (rack or floor) wobbling, but they wobble within limits.

I just don't like a bunch of stands on the floor and I like faster setup and cleaner look of a suspended tom. If the compromise is a bit of wobble, that's not a problem, with me, at least. Having played both, I can say that suspending the floor tom provides many more mounting options and reduces creep. I also don't like boring holes in my drums and my bass drum doesn't even have spurs; it is suspended in a primitive way as well. Gauger has the Dyna-Mount which brings the benefits of suspension mounting to a traditional floor tom configuration.

Check out the mounting I have; the entire floor tom comes off of one DW 9000 ball arm holder. That is a very heavy-duty stand but these drums are mean-ass heavy.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
DMC, that's the thing ... "wobble within limits".

Your post prompted me to have another look at your kit. If I was the proud owner of a ravishing beauty drumkit like that I wouldn't care about wobbly bits either :)
 

ANIMALBEATS

Silver Member
I've got DW Keller, 16" and 18" off a Pearl medium weight cymbal stand, and I generaly hit harder than your average WWE wrestler. Nay wobble troubles on my front, the microscopic amounts that they do (and i mean microscopic) I would say helps the shell resonance.

NAY WAY ARE HANGING TOMS THE WORST IDEA. (capitals over)
 
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