Worst idea in Drumming

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
How about those Fibes kits from the seventies that had concert toms that were shaped like an elbow with a flair at the mouth of what would have been the reso end!
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
The Simmons SDX. It did offer technology usually not associated with electronic drums at the time as well as multi-zone triggering, but they advertised it in Modern Drummer as if anyone could afford it. Here's a quote from wikipedia. Check out the price.

In 1987, after the SDS-9, Simmons decided to enter into the high-end professional market, and created the revolutionary but unsuccessful SDX. It introduced new features that were unheard of in other electronic drums, such as zone intelligence and pad layering. Some of these ideas were not revisited until nearly 15 years after the SDX. Zone Intelligence allowed for three samples to be put on a pad, for a more realistic sound. With pad layering, different sounds could be triggered via different strike velocities. The SDX was the first Simmons kit since the SDS-V to include cymbal sounds, with pads called "Symbals" which simulated the swaying motion of real cymbals with a swivel rod. The SDX also included a built-in sampler with a floppy disk drive as its method of storage. The SDX also introduced a new way of modifying sounds. Rather than knobs and switches, it featured a 9" monochrome screen with a GUI, similar to the early Mac OS. SDX OS allowed users to fully modify sounds with an easy-to-use interface. Sales of the SDX were limited due to its high price, costing around $10,154. Only about 280 kits were made, of which few remain.

Here are some videos I found on Youtube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cGSyPMIaP50

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9T-DcSAIagk

Jeff
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
The Simmons SDX. It did offer technology usually not associated with electronic drums at the time as well as multi-zone triggering, but they advertised it in Modern Drummer as if anyone could afford it. Here's a quote from wikipedia. Check out the price....costing around $10,154. Only about 280 kits were made, of which few remain.[/I]
Jeff
Not only were they a bad idea, but that product out Simmons out of business.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
like the ones I posted above?
Yup. Good find, Kev. I thought those things were super cool when they first came out lol. I don't mind a bit of ugliness if it's interesting - like bulldogs, for example :) The problem was that you needed much bigger cases than usual for them.

Funny that people here are more offended by messed up inventions to be played in real time than the gadgets that are squeezing us out.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member


I think they were called staccato drums...
The poster gives it away just a bit. Yes, Staccato drums did seem like a stupid idea. They look wierd, almost impossible to get cases off the shelf, heavy, etc, etc. Believe it or not, in a small acoustic gig setting, they sounded great. Ok, the kick drum was a bit pointless, but the toms had real presence.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Remo and their Acousta-whatever shells. Wood chips and glue??

I had a 1985 Encore kit.
Couldn't be any worse than wood veneers and glue (plywood)! Plywood is a wood composite material, just like particleboard (Acousticon). There's always someone else to look down on, I guess.

I have played Acousticon set a bit and it sounded great.
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I really like the big deep toms! Don't understand the hate?

The ones that really bug me are the ones that are like 12 x 8 - they look like weird snare drums. I'm a fan of the bigger beefier tom. My rack tom is 14x12 - Sort of Bonham esque.
Agreed. Deep drums give deep sound, shallow drums give shallow sound.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I contend that you can get a perfectly usable sound with drums made out of anything strong enough to take the tension, assuming round shell, even bearing edges and great tuning. After all, heads are a major percentage of the sound, as proven by frame drums.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I contend that you can get a perfectly usable sound with drums made out of anything strong enough to take the tension, assuming round shell, even bearing edges and great tuning. After all, heads are a major percentage of the sound, as proven by frame drums.
Agreed.

And a few products over the years have proven that. haha
 
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