Worst idea in Drumming

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Then they hit 12x12 and this other dude comments in that this was the worst idea in drumming history, a 12x12 rack tom. That got me thinking what are the biggest mistakes and ideas drum companies have come up with in the history of drumming? What do you guys think?
Square size power toms don't sound bad in the right hands:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zbP0F59uCw


i know some will lash out at me for this one, but personally i have to say double bass pedals take the cake for me. time and time again i see drummers who are just starting out,
buy a double pedal and run run run on it to see how fast they can get it to go, then quit playing by the time they are out of highschool because they figure out that they havent learned to play the drums, no stick control, no rudiments, they just learned to run.

and plus i think there are much more creative ways to make heart pounding metal then using a double bass.
While I agree on the over use of double bass, why blame the pedal itself for it's mis-use?
That's like saying a car is a dumb invention because someone people drive them too fast, or hundred of other useful products that get abused beyond their original intention.
 

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
I was at Chuck Levins earlier today buying myself a new drum set and we were talking about the size toms I wanted. I told him I play rock and at the time we were disscussing a Tama Superstar w/ Hyperdrive Toms kit. And this guy was old, probibly in his 60's (still the most badass guy in the place) and he was talking to me about the history of tom sizes. He said it used to be (with a 12 diameter tom) 12x6 or 7. Then as time went on it got up to 12x8 then 12x9,12x10 and so on. Then they hit 12x12 and this other dude comments in that this was the worst idea in drumming history, a 12x12 rack tom. That got me thinking what are the biggest mistakes and ideas drum companies have come up with in the history of drumming? What do you guys think?
I don't think they're that bad. I mean yeah it's not great for positioning but a nice deep tom can have godly sustain behind it which sounds really good. Maybe i'm biased b/c i have a 12x11.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
A few really bad ideas:

Square shaft drum sticks. Promark made them for a brief time, and a few companies have come and gone trying to sell squared off slip covers for sticks. The theory is that a square-shat drum stick won't roll off your snare drum when you set your sticks down; and that is the whole marketing concept.

Pre-dating the Remo Muffle, there was a product called "dead rings" or something like that. Billy Cobham actually endorsed them for a brief moment. There foam rings that had a sticky surface and you glued them to the underside of your drum heads to get a very dead 70's sound.

And who can forget Remo PTS head? Pre-tuned heads. Drum heads that came out of the box pre-tuned and clipped on to your drums. Problem was, you couldn't change the tuning either, they sounded cheap, and were actually more expensive than regular drum heads. If had a PTS kit, there was no practical way to convert it to a regular head drum kit. They ended up being only sold on beginner kits, but even then, it was a bad idea.
 

Rascul

Senior Member
Anyone remember the Doppelstick? The internet doesn't give me much, but it was a stick with an extra tip on a hinge. Too bad no one ever learned how to use one, including its inventor.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Anyone remember the Doppelstick? The internet doesn't give me much, but it was a stick with an extra tip on a hinge. Too bad no one ever learned how to use one, including its inventor.
I remember seeing sticks in the seventies that had three plastic tips.
The center tip was at the end of the stick in normal fashion.
The other two tips were moulded to a flexible U shaped piece of plastic that came from below the center tip like a three prong fork.
I never tried them. They were in the stick bin of the music store that I took lessons at.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
To the very dead 70's sound, I would like to add that canned handclap backbeat that has been so overused, it amazes me that no one has ever said.."Hey I'm pretty sure I can get a better sound than that stupid handclap atrocity"...
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
To the very dead 70's sound, I would like to add that canned handclap backbeat that has been so overused, it amazes me that no one has ever said.."Hey I'm pretty sure I can get a better sound than that stupid handclap atrocity"...
+1 Larry! There should be laws about things like that!
 

zakhopper316

Silver Member
While I agree on the over use of double bass, why blame the pedal itself for it's mis-use?
That's like saying a car is a dumb invention because someone people drive them too fast, or hundred of other useful products that get abused beyond their original intention.
__________________
imagine a car with 2 steering wheels that led to many deaths, and suspended licenses
leaving those people not driving due to crashing.
the exception is student driver cars, just as there are some who use double bass
with grace and creativity. i dont see it often tho
 

Chonson

Senior Member
Power toms, concert toms, dead bass drums, open bass drums, piccolo snares, 12" snares, etc - that stuff to me is a constant cycling of what's in and out of fashion. Concert toms were almost the most un-hip thing imaginable in the early-mid 90s but now I'm seeing them more frequently. I think this stuff is just a constant cycle of rediscovery every 20-30 years.

No, the dumb stuff to me is almost always of the "gadget" variety which seems like to the bottom of ideas that solve problems no one had.

My favorite in that category remains the Stick Flip - because apparently your arm and wrist just aren't up to the task of tossing sticks?
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
"Power toms" is a silly '80s marketing term; throughout history and even today, most drums have been deeper than wide.

As someone who has all square size drums, I'd have to say the silly shallow toms are dumb. They sound weak. Why just not go whole-hog and get roto toms?
I disagree, I barely see drums that are deeper than wide at all!!
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
One of the most obnoxious products that's being widely used these days has to be the kevlar marching SD head. They're a total musical atrocity; the aural equivalent of having your teeth drilled after your fifth Red Bull.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
+1 on those awful sounding kevlar heads Todd, yuck.

Also those tambourine jingle ring thingys you put on your hi hat rod that only last a few songs. Cheap effin crap.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
One of the most obnoxious products that's being widely used these days has to be the kevlar marching SD head. They're a total musical atrocity; the aural equivalent of having your teeth drilled after your fifth Red Bull.
I marched for years in the early seventies. We hardly ever broke heads and we used to torque the crap out of them! Why do you need Kevlar heads?
 

brady

Platinum Member
I'm surprised no one has said 'Meg White' yet...

But seriously, those Zildjian Pitch Black cymbals get my vote.
 

zakhopper316

Silver Member
I marched for years in the early seventies. We hardly ever broke heads and we used to torque the crap out of them! Why do you need Kevlar heads?
what is the purpose of them? is it so they don't break? if so then i am changing my vote.
they could come in handy during a fire fight tho.
 

BassDriver

Silver Member
Deep toms and the concert toms get me, square toms are fine but any deeper is terrible for getting into a comfortable position and to move around, ridiculous...

...unless they are low toms, which sit on the floor anyway, don't need to be placed over a bass drum...

...right next to that is also the 80s gated reverb snare drum sound...or any other gated reverb drum for that matter...

...darn it Phil Collins.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Pre-dating the Remo Muffle, there was a product called "dead rings" or something like that. Billy Cobham actually endorsed them for a brief moment. There foam rings that had a sticky surface and you glued them to the underside of your drum heads to get a very dead 70's sound.
Deadringers, and they worked perfectly for the sound desired. The design flaw (or perhaps, master plan?) was that once the Deadringer had been applied, you couldn't easily remove & re-use it. So when it was time to replace the head, you also had to buy a new Deadringer. I forget which of the guys in Spinal Tap said "it's a fine line between clever and stupid" but it certainly applies.

And who can forget Remo PTS head? Pre-tuned heads. Drum heads that came out of the box pre-tuned and clipped on to your drums. Problem was, you couldn't change the tuning either
I had a clip-style PTS kit back in the day:



Remo's also had kits with proper lugs and clips for the PTS heads, so you could at least tune the head higher than it started out. The problem was, all of the heads - even the ones they called 'dark' - were already tuned on the high side. But the selection was limited, I recall coated Ambassadors (maybe clear too) and Pinstripes. I will say that the PTS Jr. kid's kit was a very cool little bop kit, and the heads fit in with those sizes a bit better.

But it all died a quick and deserved death.

Bermuda

PS: that thing around my neck is a foam ring from a Remo Muffl which I was using on the PTS then. Young, skinny, silly me!
 
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