World's first seamless spun aluminum drum sets

Rosemarydrumco

Senior Member
Hey everyone. Josh here. I produced and put together the video of the kit. Just wanted to touch a little on the feedback regarding the processing. I am going to bounce some completely raw versions...as I think you guys will be surprised at how similar it sounds to the video. Mainly all I really did was a little bit of compression on the drum bus and I cut a few db of recording mud on the toms to bring the tone forward.

Vukan wanted to introduce the kit in a big room, so we did. It was a very lively room with natural reverb trails on everything. I think the majority of the processed feel is simply from the room. There was really no way to make it dry without heavy gating...so I can understand wanting a dry, two mic recording of this kit, but I don't think it would have worked well in this room. I genuinely believe the recording is very representative of how the drums sounded in the room. There is some drier small room clips on my instagram at rosemarydrumco.

I've been so blown away with this kit since I have had it. I'm consistently blowing sound guys minds with the tone, and the kit seems so adaptable to heads and tunings. It's just an amazing kit. :)
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I've been so blown away with this kit since I have had it. I'm consistently blowing sound guys minds with the tone, and the kit seems so adaptable to heads and tunings. It's just an amazing kit. :)

It's the Supraphonic/Acrolite of kits. Not coincidentally, made of the same shell material. I myself think I lean toward brass/copper for a metal shell kit, just for the sheer sound enjoyment, but the natural dryness of aluminum, combined with the extreme consistency of the shells/edges, as well as the lighter weight and lower cost of aluminum, will make this a far more widely-used kit than copper or brass will probably ever be.
 

Rosemarydrumco

Senior Member
It's the Supraphonic/Acrolite of kits. Not coincidentally, made of the same shell material. I myself think I lean toward brass/copper for a metal shell kit, just for the sheer sound enjoyment, but the natural dryness of aluminum, combined with the extreme consistency of the shells/edges, as well as the lighter weight and lower cost of aluminum, will make this a far more widely-used kit than copper or brass will probably ever be.

I don't know if it's the alloy or the process or whatever but I generally find the Oriollo shells to have more resonance and liveliness than the Supra/acro. Translated to kit form, it works well because they are in the moderate range sustain wise and remind me of some of my vintage drums as far as resonance goes.

Lately I've heard some brass kits and a lot of people were making a big deal of it, but sonically it didn't do much for me. Copper on the other hand I think would make a wonderful kit
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
I don't know if it's the alloy or the process or whatever but I generally find the Oriollo shells to have more resonance and liveliness than the Supra/acro. Translated to kit form, it works well because they are in the moderate range sustain wise and remind me of some of my vintage drums as far as resonance goes.

Lately I've heard some brass kits and a lot of people were making a big deal of it, but sonically it didn't do much for me. Copper on the other hand I think would make a wonderful kit

My Oriollo phantom 65 is more lively than my previous supras. It's got a roundness that the supras didn't have.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Lately I've heard some brass kits and a lot of people were making a big deal of it, but sonically it didn't do much for me. Copper on the other hand I think would make a wonderful kit

Which brass kits? I have a Lang Percussion copper kit, just straight bearing edges with no flange, and they sound great, but still not as resonant as my Jenkins-Martin Blaemire. I've got a brass 16" floor tom on order from Echo Drums, we'll see how that sounds when it gets here. It's got a flanged edge, but a floor tom that big needs one, I feel.

By the way, your playing on these recordings is super tasty.
 

Rosemarydrumco

Senior Member
Which brass kits? I have a Lang Percussion copper kit, just straight bearing edges with no flange, and they sound great, but still not as resonant as my Jenkins-Martin Blaemire. I've got a brass 16" floor tom on order from Echo Drums, we'll see how that sounds when it gets here. It's got a flanged edge, but a floor tom that big needs one, I feel.

By the way, your playing on these recordings is super tasty.

I was more referring the the brass kit by AnF they released at Namm. I love what they are doing and totally respect what they built and the company... its cool...but i wasn't a big of the sound it produced in the videos they posted.

I haven't really spent a ton of time listen to any of the other companies putting out brass kits.

Thanks so much for the kind words about my playing!
 

Rosemarydrumco

Senior Member
Hey everyone,

Here are the raw tracks for those interested...I haven't touched these with anything. I did leave my mix pretty similar to the video though, so I kept the room mics at the same level as before. I think it may be interested to go in and turn off the room mics and see what that sounds like too. Might do that as well. To my ears, turning everything off takes a bit of the polish and tightness off, but I'm not hearing night and day differences...the tones still sound the same to me...maybe just a touch not as smooth, as I am not cutting any mud out of those toms in these. Enjoy!

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7bradf4op6588lm/LowRaw.wav?dl=0
https://www.dropbox.com/s/rihdw7hdpeeam93/MidRaw.wav?dl=0
https://www.dropbox.com/s/7m7ca3rbge0ug3s/HighRaw.wav?dl=0
 

Attachments

  • LowRaw.mp3
    2.1 MB · Views: 43
  • MidRaw.mp3
    2.3 MB · Views: 27
  • HighRaw.mp3
    1.7 MB · Views: 29
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evolving_machine

Silver Member
Do you have to stress relieve the shells after you spin them? It seems that the top, or bottom of a shell would have more stress in the shell because one side was stretched more than the other side. Just as you would have to stress relieve a metal part after machining off a large amount of material from the workpiece.
 

oriollo

Senior Member
Here's an interesting new kit.
10, 13, 14, 16, 20 (+ a snare to be done).

DSC04984.jpg
 

sonormapex

Senior Member
The "high" tuning on that kit is what I personally would call perfect. That's my sound, and likely a lot of other players as well. Low and mid are HUGE, but for my jazz standards, the resonance of the higher range is OUTSTANDING.
 
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