Winter namm 2020

DaleClark

Senior Member
Thinking DW, when seeing a Gretsch drum set, will always be the last thing on my mind. They were making great looking and sounding drums before DW got their distribution rights. But that's just me. Quite frankly I don't understand why DW didn't just name the PDP brand, a PDP series of DW 20 years ago. Almost as if even they thought the PDP were not of good enough quality to bear the DW brand. And yet they were PDP by DW. The PDP snares above look great, especially the one with the dark wood hoops.
Could DW, if they are not careful, turn into the next Gibson? Too many irons in one fire? Just something to think about. Good and (especially) Lombardi are close to "hanging it up" age. A whole bunch of assets to eventually to unload for big $$$ to an entity that may not care about musicians. Just something to think about.
 

Drumprof

Member
I just saw the Sweetwater Gretsch video with Paul Cooper saying John Good had a hand in that kit.
My feeling was confirmed and Nick and I had the same thought. Still a beaut of a kit.
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
My Starclassic Maple is one of my favorite kits, and I love Tama, but man can they make some horrid finishes. Stryper kit on one side and Helloween on the other, sandwiching what I can only describe as a bruise on a corpse purple burst.
Good god, those finishes are dreadful.
 

Juniper

Gold Member
Could DW, if they are not careful, turn into the next Gibson? Too many irons in one fire? Just something to think about. Good and (especially) Lombardi are close to "hanging it up" age. A whole bunch of assets to eventually to unload for big $$$ to an entity that may not care about musicians. Just something to think about.
I think they’ll be fine as Chris Lombardi looks to be positioned in a good place to take over his fathers role when he eventually retires.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Could DW, if they are not careful, turn into the next Gibson? Too many irons in one fire?
Not likely, DW is a drum company with product sensibilities (for the most part.) Gibson/Baldwin isn't a drum company, and from what I could tell, didn't allow the Slingerland division to behave as such.

Also, DW has a major foothold in the retail and artist sectors, and can support their other brands where those brands might not be able to survive if on their own.

Bermuda
 

RobertM

Platinum Member
Maybe it’s just me, but I’m starting to feel like some drum offerings are outpacing a lot of people’s incomes. For example, a bop set of Canopus Yaiba is now running $1899 at some USA dealers, and that’s pricing on par with a Ludwig Classic Maple in bop setup. That seems a bit ridiculous?

The pricing vis-a-vis incomes seems much worse now than 10-15 years ago.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Maybe it’s just me, but I’m starting to feel like some drum offerings are outpacing a lot of people’s incomes. For example, a bop set of Canopus Yaiba is now running $1899 at some USA dealers, and that’s pricing on par with a Ludwig Classic Maple in bop setup. That seems a bit ridiculous?

The pricing vis-a-vis incomes seems much worse now than 10-15 years ago.
It was no different back in the day when a kit was $600 with cymbals and a decent income was maybe $8-10k/yr. that $600 represented a large portion of a person's income, just as $3,000 would be to someone making $40-50k. When I was looking at gear as a young drummer, a Zildjian 22" was $70 and a Ludwig stand was $12, but that $82 might as well have been a thousand. It's all relative.

Bermuda
 

RobertM

Platinum Member
It was no different back in the day when a kit was $600 with cymbals and a decent income was maybe $8-10k/yr. that $600 represented a large portion of a person's income, just as $3,000 would be to someone making $40-50k. When I was looking at gear as a young drummer, a Zildjian 22" was $70 and a Ludwig stand was $12, but that $82 might as well have been a thousand. It's all relative.

Bermuda
Not so sure I agree. I see your point, but I also know lots of folks who have been anchored at salaries between $50k-$60k a year for a long time, and yet the Yamaha Absolute Maple 4 pc kit that had a street price of $2k in 2004 is now over $3k. Of course, one significant difference is advertised selling price versus talking on phone with dealer—you can get better deals at some shops if you call or visit.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Not so sure I agree. I see your point, but I also know lots of folks who have been anchored at salaries between $50k-$60k a year for a long time, and yet the Yamaha Absolute Maple 4 pc kit that had a street price of $2k in 2004 is now over $3k
I would agree that products in general and certainly the cost of living have grown faster than incomes (at least in the big cities.) But it's still relative, and subjective. Nobody really needs to spend a lot of money to get a great sound.

Bermuda
 

toonamike

Member
It was no different back in the day when a kit was $600 with cymbals and a decent income was maybe $8-10k/yr. that $600 represented a large portion of a person's income, just as $3,000 would be to someone making $40-50k. When I was looking at gear as a young drummer, a Zildjian 22" was $70 and a Ludwig stand was $12, but that $82 might as well have been a thousand. It's all relative.

Bermuda
I used an inflation calculator. In 1967, Ludwig sold a 4 piece Super Classic set for $522. It included a few accessories as well.

How much is $522 in today's dollars?

$3,995.60

That's more than I paid for my 2018 Classic Maple 7 piece shells.
 

steadypocket

Gold Member
I used an inflation calculator. In 1967, Ludwig sold a 4 piece Super Classic set for $522. It included a few accessories as well.

How much is $522 in today's dollars?

$3,995.60

That's more than I paid for my 2018 Classic Maple 7 piece shells.
Manufacturing processes have become much more efficient over the years. CNC machines can drill a shell in a fraction of the time it used to take. Those efficiencies allow companies to offer drums today cheaper than the good old days, factoring in inflation.
 

toonamike

Member
Manufacturing processes have become much more efficient over the years. CNC machines can drill a shell in a fraction of the time it used to take. Those efficiencies allow companies to offer drums today cheaper than the good old days, factoring in inflation.
Agreed.
 
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