wierd bass pitch problem

So I've got 2 bass drums, a 22x18 and a 24x18, identical everything else. I have them open at two different pitches.... sort of a tympani effect. Problem is, the 22 comes across as lower than the 24, both in recordings and live. Seems the same no matter how I tune/muffle/mic them. Any ideas how to even the two out? It's more a lack of low-end out of the 24, even though it's at a lower pitch. The amount of EQ it takes to even them out in the mix sounds pretty bad, so I'm looking for other ideas.....

Feel free to tell me if this is a stupid idea, but I think the effect would be cool if I could get it right.
 

king fail

Senior Member
Are they made of the same type of wood?

If you really can't get a decent low end outta a 24", it seems possible to me that it may be birch, and the 22" is probably maple or something.

Just a guess really.

Are you running the same heads on each one?

Good luck with finding the right sound.
 

diosdude

Silver Member
It's more a lack of low-end out of the 24, even though it's at a lower pitch.
Lack of low end, eh? But it is pitched lower? Try using a heavier beater on it then and adding more tension to the spring. Sounds to me like you're the problem, not the drum itself (no offense). You sure you're striking with equal effort?
 
Tried the heavier beater, and if anything I'm hitting the 24 harder since it's played with the right foot. And they're both the same material, both Mapex Pro-M maple basses, same heads, same everything. I'm really stumped on why I can't get the low end out of the 24 here. Thanks for the suggestions though.
 

dkerwood

Silver Member
I'd guess it has more to do with the radio between diameter and depth. The 22" is deeper, relatively speaking, which allows more room to set up those low overtones. If I'm right, you'd need a few more inches of depth on the 24 to get the same effect.
 

That Guy

Platinum Member
I'd guess it has more to do with the radio between diameter and depth. The 22" is deeper, relatively speaking, which allows more room to set up those low overtones. If I'm right, you'd need a few more inches of depth on the 24 to get the same effect.

Thats the immediate conclusion I draw too though I don't know if its right. It makes sense cuz the air and sound is exanding rapidly inside the drum but not moving foward enough to condense. I would have to actually be there and fidgit with them to make sure.
 

bodinski

Senior Member
My bass drums seem to have more low-end when tuned higher than you'd expect. I'd try winding the 24 up a bit - both reso & batter.
Luck!
 

Nodiggie

Gold Member
Thats the immediate conclusion I draw too though I don't know if its right. It makes sense cuz the air and sound is exanding rapidly inside the drum but not moving foward enough to condense. I would have to actually be there and fidgit with them to make sure.
My guess is: if the above is true, than mic position should solve the problem. ???

OP:

Very interesting idea, I think it would be cool to hear the contrasting kicks.
 
I'd guess it has more to do with the radio between diameter and depth. The 22" is deeper, relatively speaking, which allows more room to set up those low overtones. If I'm right, you'd need a few more inches of depth on the 24 to get the same effect.
That makes a lot of sense; wouldn't be surprised if that's my problem. Messing with mic placements has helped somewhat, so hopefully I can still get what I'm looking for. Thanks for your help everybody.
 
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