Why the hate? (Lars Ulrich)

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I don't hate Lars in general; I hate that he gets put on a pedestal of being a great drummer because of album sales and notoriety...but that is how it goes in a society where bigger/richer/more subscriptions etc equate talent. I will end that rant here....

honestly, back in the day, I could not get past Charlie Benante, Gar Samulesson and Dave Lombardo to notice Lars...I loved the first 4 Metallica albums, but Lars was always just adequate compared to many of the other guys at the time...
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
Well you're a very lucky man but did he play the double bass part? The answer is noooo 😁

He admitted to being a "studio cheat" even on the album version (ie he would get through a few bars of double bass, run out of steam, then punch in the next bit).

Well you're a very lucky man but did he play the double bass part? The answer is noooo 😁

He admitted to being a "studio cheat" even on the album version (ie he would get through a few bars of double bass, run out of steam, then punch in the next bit).
He did play it, not perfect but pretty damn close, it was actually a tad bit faster than recorded, I could tell because James just gave him the "slow down" look....
 

drummanic58

Well-known member
For one thing he seems to be an arrogant man that likes to run his mouth. Buddy Rich didn't like most people anyways. Dave Grohl can play circles around Lars. Hell, Karen Carpenter could play circles around him too. While I think being mechanically good is part of what makes a great drummer, there are exceptions. Dave Grohl for one. He says Taylor Hawkins is a better drummer mechanically than he is. I think generally speaking, it's about your approach and your ability to take whatever drum kit you have in front of you and make it "sing" if you will. It doesn't matter if you have a Neal Peart kit or a Charlie Watts kit, if you can make the most out of whatever kit you're playing, diversity is what I think sets a drummer apart.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Color me a "Lars Fan." His drumming serves his band perfectly.

Younger Lars influenced me a lot. Most other late 80s thrash drummers were bashing away in very predictable fashion. His style was very inventive and fresh.
Those creatively placed crash accents, the empty space where anyone else in his genre would have mindlessly played a kick or snare . . . . . those things made an impression on me, even as a guitar player back then, and they stuck with me. There's undeniable Lars in my own drumming. Hell, there's Lars in my metal guitar riffs.
 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
People that bash Lars really weren’t around or weren’t paying attention in the 80s when he essentially set the template for metal drumming and was “the guy.”

The string of amazing metal records Metallica put out in the 1980s where Lars’ contributions as a drummer, arranger and band member were on full display solidify his place in the metal echelon.

No Lars = no Metallica. What else needs to be said?
 
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bud7h4

Silver Member
honestly, back in the day, I could not get past Charlie Benante, Gar Samulesson and Dave Lombardo to notice Lars...I loved the first 4 Metallica albums, but Lars was always just adequate compared to many of the other guys at the time...

Those guys are better drummers than Lars but Lars' drumming was very creative and remarkably effective. That's what I give him credit for, not his technical ability. Frankly, if he wasn't very good but still came up with those drum parts, that's even more phenomenal. Those other drummers, while faster and tighter, were predictable. There's nothing any of them played that made me think "I wish I would have thought of that", or "where did that come from?" (Actually Lombardo has a couple of times)
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
Those guys are better drummers than Lars but Lars' drumming was very creative and remarkably effective. That's what I give him credit for, not his technical ability. Frankly, if he wasn't very good but still came up with those drum parts, that's even more phenomenal. Those other drummers, while faster and tighter, were predictable. There's nothing any of them played that made me think "I wish I would have thought of that", or "where did that come from?" (Actually Lombardo has a couple of times)

Not sure about calling a Jazz fusion guy 'predictable'.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Those guys are better drummers than Lars but Lars' drumming was very creative and remarkably effective. That's what I give him credit for, not his technical ability. Frankly, if he wasn't very good but still came up with those drum parts, that's even more phenomenal. Those other drummers, while faster and tighter, were predictable. There's nothing any of them played that made me think "I wish I would have thought of that", or "where did that come from?" (Actually Lombardo has a couple of time

while I definitely agree with you about his drum part writing on the first 3 albums, I don't think Lars' drumming on Master is any more/less effective than Benante on Among The Living, or Gar on Peace Sells...and for me it really has nothing to do with speed and technicality in that aspect....the difference for me is that Benante and Gar were able to replicate live better, at least from what I saw. I feel like James and Cliff/Newstead were actually "driving the bus", and Lars was always sort of out on his own - which is fine - but sometimes that led to ticks and mistakes that only got recovered b/c of those two actually driving
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Not sure about calling a Jazz fusion guy 'predictable'.

Considering Mustaine wrote an entire album (Peace Sells) of some of the best metal riffs ever recorded, the drumming was unfortunate. It's not bad, not at all. But those songs - those riffs - deserve better. I agree with you, jazz fusion experience commonly makes one a noticeably creative metal drummer, but the drumming on Peace Sells is boring compared to the guitar work.
If Lars had played on Peace Sells - on that album in particular - it would have been epic.

Edit: Nevertheless, I still like Peace Sells more than anything Metallica did, as far as entire albums.
 
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MrPockets

Gold Member
Considering Mustaine wrote an entire album (Peace Sells) of some of the best metal riffs ever recorded, the drumming was unfortunate. It's not bad, not at all. But those songs - those riffs - deserve better. I agree with you, jazz fusion experience commonly makes one a noticeably creative metal drummer, but the drumming on Peace Sells is boring compared to the guitar work.
If Lars had played on Peace Sells - on that album in particular - it would have been epic.

Edit: Nevertheless, I still like Peace Sells more than anything Metallica did, as far as entire albums.

I think Dave wanted a solid foundation to play on top of and not some guy doing weird grooves. Look at his praise of Drover.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
I think Dave wanted a solid foundation to play on top of and not some guy doing weird grooves. Look at his praise of Drover.
Calling Lars' grooves weird is like calling Dave's riffs weird.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
IEM: Check Only James' guitar in them: Check Get mad recognition for being mediocre: Check

Act like pompous, entitled jerk: Definite Check.
The Lars path to stardom.
 

BrokenStick

Junior Member
I think the hate for Lars is two-fold and neither has anything to do with his drumming ability.

1) Like was stated above, Lars has somehow always came off as a completely, arrogant, self centered moron whenever he seems to open his mouth.

2) Lars was and still is a key player against music piracy and for a lot of people it just burns into their skulls exactly how you can be complaining about something when you literally have millions of dollars. Even though he's totally in his right, he just comes off as super greedy to the average person when the subject of piracy comes up.

And that's just my 2 cents. But I really think those 2 things are why some people don't like him. In my opinion, his drumming fits in exceptionally well with the music he's playing. He plays enough to keep drummers interested, but not enough to be overbearing to the music itself.

Peace, Defender
I think you nailed it.

I used to carpool with a guy who was a huge Metallica fan, and I ended up hearing all their stuff to that point for the first time. He's a competent drummer. I've no idea if he is innovative or cutting edge as metal isn't my thing. He didn't blow me away or really catch my interest the way other metal drummers I was exposed to did.
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
Careful....
This whole issue feeds into what is the drummer for. Do the Stones need a "great" technical drummer? of course not, same with AC DC. The Lars thing? I bet 95% of the audience don't even notice.
Jeff Beck was asked to join the Stones.
Turned it down because they were too sloppy as a band.
Ron Wood was the best musician in that band and took the money and ran.
Jeff noted it would have been nice financially ,but artistically it just wasn't a good fit.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Jeff Beck was asked to join the Stones.
Turned it down because they were too sloppy as a band.
Ron Wood was the best musician in that band and took the money and ran.
Jeff noted it would have been nice financially ,but artistically it just wasn't a good fit.

there is a small minority of us musicians who do not define "success" and happiness as monetary wealth ...

I am proudly one of them
 
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