Why? Paradiddle for Beginners

Rock Salad

Junior Member
I have wondered why some people insist that paradiddles are crucial. This vid explained it in a way that was understandable to my inexpert understanding, gave a good way to verbalize the concepts. Right on Dorothea and Drumeo

 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
You don't need a video to explain the absolutely essential reason why.

It gets you to your other hand.

When you're moving around the drumset, transitioning between elements, being able to switch hands on the fly is crucial. And paradiddles let you do that.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Right but the same can be accomplished by simply working on doing doubles and singles in different combinations and accents. I think there's certainly value to rudiments if you enjoy doing compound rudiment work, but it's not a requirement unless you're doing marching stuff.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Well sure. I think the hard coordination stuff, like paradiddles and linear stuff and 4-way independence is really important for brain health, though. Almost as important as working on having a deep, deep, stanky groove.
I think any time you push your brain into uncomfortable territory and force it to do things that aren't easy you grow a little. That can be paradiddles or it can be taking apart someone's solo, or it can be writing music or learning a totally new style. For me, usually dry regurgitation of the basics are sometimes hard to get good value from because I don't find it fun. As a parallel I hate doing math problems listed on a page, but I love working out the dimensions of something I'm building or working on in the world.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Thanks for offering that up. I really like Dorathea and the attitude she brings to the table. She has some very fortunate students.

GeeDeeEmm
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
When you're moving around the drumset, transitioning between elements, being able to switch hands on the fly is crucial. And paradiddles let you do that.
Exactly. Even if I didn't know the sticking was a rudiment, I would be doing it anyway on the kit. But knowing what a paradiddle is allowed me to employ it, and I do so without even thinking. It's just part of my sticking, and as natural as R L R L.

Bermuda
 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
I have known what a paradiddle is for 40 years, but saw no reason not to just think of it as two singles and a double rather than a discrete unit. Dorothea showed a good reason and method to see it as a unit
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
It's the basis and foundation of a lot of stuff.

You can run it through the accent grid, then do all the SC stickings. Paradiddles are the hardest ones, so you'll be pretty well set for working on the rest.

Chaffee's sticking books and Morello's Master Studies are just continuations on the concept. It might look endless and there's a lot there, but the stuff that's useful and you end up prefering is not. Application and ways to use it in the kit is pretty endless, though.

Subdivisions would be next and trying those paraddile exercises as triplets should start opening up those doors. You'll have a 3 over 4 thing happening that will provide flow and aural logic no matter what accents you choose.
 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
I do the basic RlrR/lrLl etc. as triplets. and that is fun as an exercise, but how do you mean Arne? Thanks!
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
If you want to ever play a decent solo, you need to learn rudiments. plain and simple. There is NO better way to work on things like ghost notes, accents, singles, doubles, displacements, modulation, etc than using rudiments and getting patterns DRILLED into your brain. Playing RLRRLRLL doesn't sound good until you have done it for a few years and know how to use it. I love paradiddles as triplets, and then displacing them in weird subdivisions. also, not starting on the one makes it even more fun. Rlr rLr llR lrr Lrl lRl rrL rll That pattern can become very fun.

Then, the key is to not play paraiddle paradiddle paradiddle in a fill. going in and out of diddles and other rudiments in a fluid motion is where the magic happens. I always try and suggest learning 5-10 rudiments WELL rather than try and learn 20 mediocre. By well i mean in different subdivisions, displaced, able to move them around and go in and out of each other.

That is literally all it takes to be able to solo..... heck I can take 4 patterns and play them for quite a while without repeating.

Anyone who says they are a waste of time is 100% incorrect, and is only bashing them because they didn't work on them.

That being said, if you can combine doubles and singles in patterns well, you are essentially doing the same thing. It is easier to teach/learn and you can structure your practice much better than randomly tossing in singles and doubles.

And true, if you only want to play simple money beats all day and minimal fills, there is really no NEED for it, but if you ever watch someone who can solo (good), they practiced their ruidments.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Wondering why paradiddles, or any rudiments for that matter, are crucial for drumming is like someone wanting to write the next great novel but wondering why words and sentences are crucial. They just are, because they are the foundation that everything else is built upon. If you want to take drums even remotely seriously, you need to learn your rudiments. End of story.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
Right but the same can be accomplished by simply working on doing doubles and singles in different combinations and accents. I think there's certainly value to rudiments if you enjoy doing compound rudiment work, but it's not a requirement unless you're doing marching stuff.
I believe that's what's called "practicing paradiddles". Not to be snarky of course. Somebody like maybe Alan Dawson (?) said something to the effect that everybody is playing rudiments, some just don't know it.

I think the most important function of the paradiddle is the launch pad it provides for becoming a competent player. Starting with the inversions (RLRRLRLL, RLLRLRRL, RRLRLLRL, and RLRLLRLR) for your hands, each of which teaches you some different things. Slews of accent exercises, and great independence exercises that can blast your playing wide open (all 4 inversions on ride and snare, over a samba pattern with your feet, anyone? The first time I got that one working smoothly after a few weeks of practice I felt everything in my playing shift to a higher level.).
 
Last edited:
Top