Why I dislike certain drum owners

bud7h4

Silver Member
I'm not seeing a problem with what this awful person said or how he said it. Whether it's drums, guns, cars, etc, I buy them to use them but I always consider their resale value before modifying or adding stuff to them. People sell things and buy new things. If I do I sell something I want it to be desirable so I get the most for it. What a concept!

I was expecting the person in question here to be a total asshole by the thread title. Turns out he's just a guy you disagree with about something petty.

Edit: I'm not the guy lol
 
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GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Seems to me that if you buy something with the question of what the re-sale value is, you aren't totally sold on the object. Somewhere, in the back of your mind, you are looking for an out, incase you find later there is something you don't like. I drilled my virgin Renown bass drum so that it met my current needs. I don't now and didn't then, think about who was going to bash me for "ruining" a bass drum. It's altered, sound is the same, and it is still a bass drum that prevnets at least one stand or a rack.
 

boomstick

Silver Member
I have a natural tendency to try to improve things, and modify them to better fit my needs. I've modified cars, bikes, furniture, camping gear, etc. Drums are no exception. I've modified my two kits in all sorts of ways. I can understand a desire to keep rare/vintage gear in the original state, but altering mass produced products shouldn't cause so much anxiety. To each their own, but I find it strange to be so beholden to how the corporate world defines things. Isn't experimentation part of the artistic process? For example:

The Frankenstrat was Eddie Van Halen's attempt to combine the sound of a classic Gibson guitar with the physical attributes and tremolo bar functionality of a Fender Stratocaster. It was made from a Northern Ash Stratocaster body, with pickup routing which he modified to fit a Gibson PAF humbucking pickup in the bridge position. The guitar has a maple neck and fretboard, chrome hardware, and was painted with a black and white striped design until arriving at its final combination of red background with black and white stripes.

How's the "resale value" on that heavily modified instrument, I wonder?
 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
I'm not seeing a problem with what this awful person said or how he said it. Whether it's drums, guns, cars, etc, I buy them to use them but I always consider their resale value before modifying or adding stuff to them. People sell things and buy new things. If I do I sell something I want it to be desirable so I get the most for it. What a concept!

I was expecting the person in question here to be a total asshole by the thread title. Turns out he's just a guy you disagree with about something remarkably petty.

Edit: I'm not the guy lol

Honestly, given the state of the world right now and that we're in the midst of a pandemic, you would think we would be more resilient and less triggered about drum equipment.

When buying/selling in the aftermarket, you need a lot of patience and extremely low standards as sub-optimal responses are the name of the game 🤷‍♂️
 

Ransan

Senior Member
Most are hung up about resale lol!
Maybe your personal exchanges will be presented on the forum which I think is a final frontier we cannot cross.
 
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madjack956

Well-known member
Seems to me that if you buy something with the question of what the re-sale value is, you aren't totally sold on the object. Somewhere, in the back of your mind, you are looking for an out, incase you find later there is something you don't like. I drilled my virgin Renown bass drum so that it met my current needs. I don't now and didn't then, think about who was going to bash me for "ruining" a bass drum. It's altered, sound is the same, and it is still a bass drum that prevnets at least one stand or a rack.
All due respect Mr. Moderator, but this is hands down the stupidest statement I have heard so far today.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
I agree, Wildbill.

Drilling a virgin kick and installing a non-matching mount on a top-end or vintage kick isn't a wise idea.
.......

Well....that's not exactly what I was saying. I'm not a collector or into vintage stuff.
But if I found something I really wanted, top-end or vintage, or whatever, and felt that I needed to modify to suit me, I would do it.
If at some point I sold it and had to take a loss on it, I would accept that.

I would also expect to take some flack about it, if it was a rare vintage set. Some mods can't be undone.
Extremely unlikely that I would ever get a set like that.
But if I did, and modified it in a way that can't be undone, I probably wouldn't make a post about it. :p
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
All due respect Mr. Moderator, but this is hands down the stupidest statement I have heard so far today.

Maybe so, but I agree with GruntersDad on this.
When I find something I really want, I don't consider what I could sell it for.
I buy it to use it, to have it, and to enjoy it.
If it's a total financial loss when I move onto something else, I still consider it money well spent.
I'm an old guy though, so that probably figures into it too. :ROFLMAO:
 
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someguy01

Well-known member
Who here has sold anything aside from real estate for an actual profit?

Cars - lose value instantly unless you have a hemi 'cuda in storage you bought new and are willing to sell at auction.
Drums - unless you bought that Slingerland kit new in 1950 whatever, you're not gonna make a profit. No one is right side up in their drum kit.
Motorcycles - just like cars, same scenario applies
Toys - rare that you'll make a profit unless you're a serious collector and then, that's your whole gig. I had a friend that dealt in rare collectible toys, he still had a day job to pay the bills.
I've sold plenty of vehicles and equipment for more than I paid, but also put in a fair share of new parts. Once my time is factored in at an average labour rate, I lost money.
The ROI/resale argument is just plain stupid. Almost no consumer good increases in value over time with use. Not even someone's precious DW collectors series set they bought from John Good himself and had signed by God.
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
Hopefully we can all agree that this type of gear snobbery is not limited solely to DW owners. Try putting an aftermarket tom mounting system on any maker’s drums, post about it on said maker’s fanboy FB group, and the snobs will lose their sh!t.
This reminded me of one time when I accompanied a friend to get strings for his Ephiphone Les Paul... The GC store had an actual Les Paul identical to my friends guitar (which he had modded). He plugged the original Les Paul and then his guitar to the same amp with the same settings ( his guitar a $600 but with $200 worth of mods.. mostly better pickups) sounded (noticeable) better than the $3000 Les Paul. Any guitar snob would've gone for the Les Paul and not even bother to consider the "lesser" brand. I see the same happening with drums and drum hardware. I saw and heard what smart mods can do to an instrument so I am not opposed to improvement mods as long as they are not limiting the original intended functionality only enhancing it.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Seems to me that if you buy something with the question of what the re-sale value is, you aren't totally sold on the object. Somewhere, in the back of your mind, you are looking for an out, incase you find later there is something you don't like.

Just because you're considering selling something doesn't mean you were thinking about selling it when you bought it. I don't hold on to everything I own for my entire life. Things get sold for all kinds of reasons.
How's the "resale value" on that heavily modified instrument, I wonder?

LOL, I'm gonna hack up my Strat this evening because obviously it will be worth what EDDIE VAN HALEN'S is.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Although that's not what I said at all, have at it.


Maybe I misunderstood, I certainly wouldn't have "attacked" you or intentionally misrepresented what you posted. We're all friends here, at least I am.
But I mean come on, they're talking about modifying / mixing drum parts and you bring up EVH's Frankenstat and resale value . . . . . . . . I don't really see where I was so out of line 🙃
 

boomstick

Silver Member
No you didn't attack me. You attacked an argument I didn't make. Here's the question I prefaced that comment with:

Isn't experimentation part of the artistic process?

EVH looked at what the guitar companies were offering and decided they didn't fit his needs, so he put a bunch of different stuff together to make something uniquely his own. He wasn't thinking about "resale value." He was thinking about making his instrument work for him the way he wanted. This was surely part of the creative process that led his distinctive sound and playing style, as well as his signature visual style (paint job). The value of the instrument mainly has to do with an artist pursuing his creative vision, not factory specs. This tendency to tinker is also why he's a patent holder. I wonder how many other patent holders got their ideas by modifying existing products? A lot, I bet. This is not to say that everyone who alters their gear will achieve Van Halen level success, but if it simply makes the instrument work better for them, then it's worth it, imo. Point is, limiting yourself to corporate approved specs can limit you as an artist, and diverting from them could lead to unexpected rewards, not "hack your strat and it will be worth as much as EVH's." That's a huge leap.
 
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madjack956

Well-known member
Who here has sold anything aside from real estate for an actual profit?

Cars - lose value instantly unless you have a hemi 'cuda in storage you bought new and are willing to sell at auction.
Drums - unless you bought that Slingerland kit new in 1950 whatever, you're not gonna make a profit. No one is right side up in their drum kit.
Motorcycles - just like cars, same scenario applies
Toys - rare that you'll make a profit unless you're a serious collector and then, that's your whole gig. I had a friend that dealt in rare collectible toys, he still had a day job to pay the bills.
I've sold plenty of vehicles and equipment for more than I paid, but also put in a fair share of new parts. Once my time is factored in at an average labour rate, I lost money.
The ROI/resale argument is just plain stupid. Almost no consumer good increases in value over time with use. Not even someone's precious DW collectors series set they bought from John Good himself and had signed by God.
I guess we all have different experiences.
I have made a profit on every Harley I owned since 17 years old except the one I have now. I'm 64.
I have made money on every gun I have sold except one.
I have made money on a lot of cars I owned in my day, not everyone, but the ones that counted. Pontiac Grand Prix, 66' Chevelle, 70' Chevy Malibu, 66' MGB, Datsun 240Z, 70' El Camino.
High end knives I have bought and sold.
I drove all those cars, rode the motorcycles for years until sold, shot all the guns.
I have machine shop equipment that goes up in value as the years go on.

I did not set out to make a profit on any of the items, except the knives.
But, I like to by things that are nice (too me), and will hold some value. I don't care if they don't make a profit, its a perk, but I do like to get something back on my investment so I can move on in a better position to buy the next item.

Yes, I work on my own stuff. No, I don't put a dollar value on my spare time. Its spare time. If I can spend it saving myself some money instead of parked in front of the tv, it is worth it. I've been tinkering in my shop most of my life. I enjoy it. It keeps me out of jail.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
All due respect Mr. Moderator, but this is hands down the stupidest statement I have heard so far today.
I'll respect your opinion even though you didn't respect mine. And adding "all due respect" doesn't make it so. Real estate is something that this is understood. How is the housing market? OK, but drums, I'll stand by my stupid statement.
 

BrokenStick

Junior Member
Drums are meant to be played. If you need to mod to make them comfortable for you go for it. Sometimes that mod can make all the difference. Funny enough, I have a post on here about how the install of the mount at issue in Bo’s post on my Gretsch Brooklyn totally changed my opinion of the kit for the better.
If the mod makes you play more it was worth it.
I bought a Gretsch kit with a virgin kick, and I am kicking myself (pun intended) for not having drilled it and put some kind of mount there. I've never been a fan of isolation mounts, and somehow I allowed myself to be talked into keeping this kit undrilled as far as mounting hardware goes.
 
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