Why does the flam grace note have a tremelo strikethrough?

Mighty_Joker

Silver Member
I've been doing a lot of work with theory, rhythm, and notation recently for an upcoming publication. I can't really find a reason or origin for why the adopted standard (PAS notation, Vic Firth education etc.) notation has a flam notated with a grace note with a strikethrough. Sibelius offers a variation without the strikethrough, and seems to treat the strikethrough version more like a drag in playback.

Vic Firth's website uses the strikethrough: https://vicfirth.zildjian.com/education/40-essential-rudiments.html

As does PAS: https://www.pas.org/docs/default-source/default-document-library/pas-drum-rudiments-2018dcccc96de1726e19ba7fff00008669d1.pdf?sfvrsn=fdbeaea5_6

Everything else with a tremelo strikethrough treats it like a diddle, doubling the note value for that note, so why does the flam grace note have one?
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
In Mozart’s day, a grace note with a slash through it (acciaccatura) was played quickly, just before the main note just like a flam. A grace note without the slash (apoggiatura) was played on the beat, for half the value of the next note. Basically a shorthand way of writing two even eighth notes.
 

Mighty_Joker

Silver Member
In Mozart’s day, a grace note with a slash through it (acciaccatura) was played quickly, just before the main note just like a flam. A grace note without the slash (apoggiatura) was played on the beat, for half the value of the next note. Basically a shorthand way of writing two even eighth notes.
That's really interesting, thank you. I was wondering the difference between acciaccatura and apoggiatura. I don't quite get apoggiatura, having no experience of it, but I assumed the difference was something to do with it.

Follow up question then, should flam have a tie to the note to which it's connected, and if so, why?
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Follow up question then, should flam have a tie to the note to which it's connected, and if so, why?
[/QUOTE]

Excellent question - I’ve no idea about the tie.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
In Mozart’s day, a grace note with a slash through it (acciaccatura) was played quickly, just before the main note just like a flam. A grace note without the slash (apoggiatura) was played on the beat, for half the value of the next note. Basically a shorthand way of writing two even eighth notes.
For drumming purposes I think it would be considered an acciaccatura-- an unmetered ornament. According to my Oxford Dictionary of Music (which would be nowhere near the final word on percussion notation), an appoggiatura has a specific harmonic function-- a "leaning tone". FWIW, they notate acciac. with the slash, and appog. without it-- and neither with a tie. I never thought about any of it, but that's what that book says. Wikipedia makes no mention of any harmonic function, but who the hell knows who wrote that...
 

Alain Rieder

Silver Member
I'm working on a new book, I also use Sibelius, and I was wondering the same thing a few days ago.
I haven’t used the sounds in Sibelius for a long time, and they are disconnected, so I can’t check how it sounds with the slashes.
For me too, the slash suggests two notes.
I checked some books I have at home, including Norman Weinberg’s, and I found one with the flams written without slashes.
Also, to me it doesn't really make sense to use a tie, although it is standard.
I think I prefer not to have ties on the pages I write, and I may choose not to use them.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Just to be clear for the audience-- the slash does not indicate a double. That would make it a ruff, which is notated differently. Flams are just written funny.
 

Alain Rieder

Silver Member
Here is an example of flams written without slashes or ties.

That's in Evolution of Jazz Drumming by Danny Gotlieb

IMG_20200302_214652.JPG

Ties and no slashes on another page of the same book :

IMG_20200302_214331.JPG
 
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