why do you think England has beaten The Us in the rock n roll race(from 1960's to the end of golden age of rock A.K.A the 1970's)

Lucas.Lankford

Active member
I think it's just because them being a so small had to figure out away to make them unique and dominant at something that anyone could do(well not anyone but you get the point)
 

Lucas.Lankford

Active member
I think it's just because them being a so small had to figure out away to make them unique and dominant at something that anyone could do(well not anyone but you get the point)
it doesn't have to be the end of the 1970's as long as the British bands where still dominating hair metal and all the new american genres of music!
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I didnt realize it was a contest. I'm imagining that the bands in reference are (in no particular order) Purple Sabbath Stones Zeppelin Beatles.

I would like to respond with Dead Skynyrd Beach Creedence Doors.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
The British took each genre to possibly its highest level during that time, but if you’ll notice, they never invented a genre. The only exception would be Black Sabbath inventing heavy metal. All new genres except metal have come from the US. Americans have been too busy inventing new genres to perfect the ones they’ve already created.
 

nicholasBR

Well-known member
Simple. The British art school system of the time. The Beatles, Stones, The Who, Queen, Bowie, Kinks, etc, etc. etc. all had members who had been in art college.
 

s1212z

Well-known member
I believe Brits clearly had a deeper appreciation of American blues music than Americans did. It probably remained underground through the post war 50s until fed it back to US audiences amplified. Of course social issues were a factor. Even Miles would say how under appreciated Jazz/Blues was in US and was generally treated poorly comparing to Europe or Asia, the art form was far more appreciated
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
The Brits didn’t have Zappa and the Mothers. Game over.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I didnt realize it was a contest. I'm imagining that the bands in reference are (in no particular order) Purple Sabbath Stones Zeppelin Beatles.

I would like to respond with Dead Skynyrd Beach Creedence Doors.

Inflammatory admission: I like the Doors and Skynyrd more than the Beatles, the Stones, Sabbath, Zeppelin, and Purple combined.

I'll take cover now for fear of having rotten vegetables hurled at me from the cyber-sphere.
 
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MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Inflammatory admission: I like the Doors and Skynyrd more than the Beatles, the Stones Sabbath, Zeppelin, and Purple combined.
I can almost second that. I like me some Purple Sabbath. Otherwise yeah, Doors and Skynyrd all the way.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
My historical take is like this.

The gap the British Invasion came to fill, is when Elvis went off to serve.
While the invasion came about here in the States, The Buckinghams from Chicago were seemingly more British sounding than most of the bands from across the pond. The Grass Roots studio factory were holding it up pretty well with hit after hit.

When Elvis came back in ‘68 with ‘If I can Dream’ - Game Over!
The King was back for a short while.
 
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Sebenza

Member
I believe Brits clearly had a deeper appreciation of American blues music than Americans did. It probably remained underground through the post war 50s until fed it back to US audiences amplified. Of course social issues were a factor. Even Miles would say how under appreciated Jazz/Blues was in US and was generally treated poorly comparing to Europe or Asia, the art form was far more appreciated
Jimi Hendrix comes to mind when I read this...the fact that it took an England trip and two Brits for a rhythm section to finally blow up to the American blues/rock icon he is now....
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I don't no if that statement is true, but I do know that many English groups mention American blues and soul groups as there main influence. a lot of thei early music were covers of American groups.
 
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