Why do you Play?

Ransan

Senior Member
Dude, I'll be straight, I'm chasing the dragon.

The "high" you get from locking in with other musicians and really grooving, communicating without speaking... That's the stuff. Making music is like magic sometimes, like a conscious manipulation of energy and mood.
Yessr, same - your post is primo👌
 

ottog1979

Senior Member
Zero doubt in my #1 reason: When I'm playing at my best, I'm 100% present. There is no yesterday, tomorrow, worries, thinking about chores or the checkbook or any other thoughts other than what is going on immediately in the NOW, in that room, with exactly whoever I'm with. I'm free, only in the moment and there is nothing else. Also known as the flow state by some.

So much of life, as is necessary I guess, is bogged down with analyzing the past, anxiety about the future and worrying or thinking about other people or other places rather than where you actually are at the moment. But all those things (some other place, some other time, someone else) take us away from intimacy (here, now, us). That's why we go see live music: It's an intimate experience - right here, right now, us. Recorded music is good, but it's not THAT.

I've come to realize that a lot of the extra curricular activities that I'm involved in are similar. When you're doing them well you're in the 100% presence state.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Dude, I'll be straight, I'm chasing the dragon.

The "high" you get from locking in with other musicians and really grooving, communicating without speaking... That's the stuff. Making music is like magic sometimes, like a conscious manipulation of energy and mood.
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Darth Vater

Senior Member
These days I play for my own enjoyment. I was very active in the 70's and 80's. I have no inclination to try to recapture that exciting time in the history of music. I feel blessed that I was there and in midst of it. Music is VERY different now. Not all for the better either.
 

Supernoodle

Senior Member
For me it intensifies music. Listening to good music is exciting in itself, but on drums you actually become a big part of it and (even better if it happens) make an audience feel it too.
 
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Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
I used to ride around on my bike as a 5/6 year old with a battery powered radio taped to my handlebars. I just love music. My mother used to put in an 8-track while she was fixing dinner and dance around. I was ALWAYS into the rhythm of things, the GROOVE. When I found my friend's drumsticks and drumpad, I realized very quickly I had some natural abilities and just messing around for 10 minutes, he realized I was already better than he and he said I should start playing. I'm glad he didn't punch me for being better! I've always been a solid groove/time keeper. And, I just love getting lost with others jamming. What a feeling.


Darth, music is WAY different today. Taylor Swift is hugely influential. That's just funny. I hear her "style" in country and pop today. I can't stand it. It's repetitive, and monotonous.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Today? Well, I've been playing off and on for almost 50 yrs. I play now because it's part of my being and health. If I'm not playing at least a few hours every week, my hands, wrists, elbows start acting up. So in a sense, I'm enslaved to drums whether I like it or not. I just happen to like it. Well mostly.

Yesteryear? I probably started playing to out-do my brother who was the one that brought drums and drumming into the house. When he gave me the drums, I felt compelled to take on the mantle. Siblings encouraged me onward of course so eventually there was some self-belief in there. I'd like to think part of the appeal is the cool factor. The cockpit factor is there - a shield of sturdy jagged hardware protecting you physically and socially. It's also the largest instrument on stage, and it has the loudest sound.

Short story long, it chose me and hasn't let go.
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
I used to ride around on my bike as a 5/6 year old with a battery powered radio taped to my handlebars. I just love music. My mother used to put in an 8-track while she was fixing dinner and dance around. I was ALWAYS into the rhythm of things, the GROOVE. When I found my friend's drumsticks and drumpad, I realized very quickly I had some natural abilities and just messing around for 10 minutes, he realized I was already better than he and he said I should start playing. I'm glad he didn't punch me for being better! I've always been a solid groove/time keeper. And, I just love getting lost with others jamming. What a feeling.


Darth, music is WAY different today. Taylor Swift is hugely influential. That's just funny. I hear her "style" in country and pop today. I can't stand it. It's repetitive, and monotonous.
I come from a time (late 60's/70's/80's) when there were GREAT AM and FM stations. On the weekends you might get a couple full albums played without commercial interruption and then an interview with the artist. The good AM stations would be blasting Motown, Roy Orbison, Lulu and the Righteous Brothers! We didn't stare at phones or computer screens. We were outside on nice days and at jams or house parties at night. There were a ton of bands, good and not so good, many that gigged pretty much WED thru SUN. Guitarists would actually plug straight into an amp or maybe have a wah wah, phase shifter or fuzz tone pedal.

There were no clik tracks. Good drummers were in demand for their ability to groove and project a solid rock/soul sound. The Marshall stacks actually had speakers in them and the Acoustic bass amps had prestige because people figured you had to be good to be willing drag one of those monsters around. Bands had their own PA's, soundman, roadies because the gigs were one nighters unless you were really lucky to have a house gig in one of the reputable rock clubs in one of the big cities. You haven't lived until you muscled a couple of Altec Voice of Theaters up a couple flights of stairs! LOL Gosh those were fun times. The club/concert scene for the really good bands, that I played in, ran from Detroit to Toronto to Cleveland to Pittsburgh to NY. You had to be ready for a call at anytime to either do a club, a festival, or open for a national act. Not to mention all the college gigs.

While I admire all the gear, 'net accessible lessons, videos and technology that today's drummers have access to, I wouldn't trade those times for anything.
 
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