why do they call hoops "triple flanged"

dairyairman

Platinum Member
what is meant by the term "triple flanged" when referring to drum hoops? are there single and double flanged hoops too? what about quadruple flanged? would that be even better?
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flange

A triple-flanged rim is bent 3 times for stability (and to contour the drum head hoop). I have seen single- and double-flanged hoops on antique and cheaper drums. I've never seen a quadruple-flanged hoop, though.

The main choices you have are die-cast and triple-flanged. Die cast will be more rigid, and triple-flanged will have more "give" or flex. For example, when you tune with a die cast hoop, tuning one rod will more immediately impact the tuning of the rods around it than a triple-flanged hoop. But, if you do a lot of rim shots, a die-cast hoop will help keep your tuning, because even though the 1 or 2 rods where you do your rimshots will come loose, the rest of the hoop won't budge.

Die-cast hoops are supposed to have a "drier" sound, too. However, I've never run into a drum, with die-cast OR triple-flanged hoops, that I couldn't make "wet" or "dry" just by tuning it (as long as the heads were good...).
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
so i guess "triple" refers to the degree of flanging done. is that right?

i'm familiar with die cast hoops, but i wonder why they're never flanged? you'd think that would be a good thing. maybe it's because if they were flanged you wouldn't be able to get them out the mold.
 

freebirdgdw

Silver Member
so i guess "triple" refers to the degree of flanging done. is that right?

i'm familiar with die cast hoops, but i wonder why they're never flanged? you'd think that would be a good thing. maybe it's because if they were flanged you wouldn't be able to get them out the mold.
I guess it's because it just not necessary with the diecast hoops. And yeah it means the three flanges, or folds in the metal, basically.
 

RogerLudwig

Senior Member
There are three places that the hoop is flanged. One, it is bent over on top to keep from chopping up sticks. The second one is a horizontal bend so that the hoop covers the top of the ring on the outside of the head and so pressure can be applied to the hoop on the head when cranking the tension rods. The third bend is a downward one that covers the hoop from being seen. Purely cosmetic.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
There are three places that the hoop is flanged. One, it is bent over on top to keep from chopping up sticks. The second one is a horizontal bend so that the hoop covers the top of the ring on the outside of the head and so pressure can be applied to the hoop on the head when cranking the tension rods. The third bend is a downward one that covers the hoop from being seen. Purely cosmetic.
That's it exactly!

I'm personally a fan of the vintage Slingerland "stick-saver" hoops, where the top of the hoop isn't flanged outward at a sharp angle, but rather rounds itself inward a little. Man, they sound and feel nice...
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
I guess it's because it just not necessary with the diecast hoops. And yeah it means the three flanges, or folds in the metal, basically.
Die-cast hoops are just that, they're cast into their final shape, while flanged hoops are bent into shape, which is where the "flanged" comes in.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
I'm personally a fan of the vintage Slingerland "stick-saver" hoops, where the top of the hoop isn't flanged outward at a sharp angle, but rather rounds itself inward a little.
Me twice. The "sticksaver" is great. I've equiped my 12, 13, 16 Rogers toms with those.
 
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