Why Can't Bass Drum Spurs Be (a lot) Smaller?

They may be lighter, and they may do the job, but to kneel on a fucking beer soaked stage for five minutes five nights a week trying to get to angle right is just silly. Plus they don’t keep the drum from moving.

or use memorylocks and take 30 seconds to install them
Like I said. They still don’t keep the drum from moving FOR ME.
 
I tried to find some for the pork pies and couldn’t find the right size. Do Sonor’s have memory locks? How bout the placement of them on new Ludwig club date kits ? They don’t even get the hoop off the ground. Over 3 grand for a limited edition Legacy Club Date and that’s what you get. Nice :)
You can find DW locks to fit almost anything.. if you don’t care about looks the hose clamp solution always work.
i use the Gilbrater / Dunnett R series spurs with the pointed tip they hold fine and come in different diameter’s
cannot speak to a bad choice from Ludwig on that.. too bad if that’s the case
 
They may be lighter, and they may do the job, but to kneel on a fucking beer soaked stage for five minutes five nights a week trying to get to angle right is just silly. Plus they don’t keep the drum from moving.

or use memorylocks and take 30 seconds to install them
Yeah those crappy old spurs just don’t hold up to heavy playing
For every example you want to show of them working I could find you a picture of Elvin Jones with a nail thru the front hoop.
 
I have an old Pearl kit, a newer Pearl kit, and a newer Premier kit. My pedals have the spikes extended. I'm on carpet and have no bass drum creep issues with any kit.
 
There are a million products out there now to stop bass drum creep, which suggests to me that, for a lot of people, the modern spurs aren't functioning any better than the vintage ones were.

I think it suggests that a lot of people do not set up their drums and pedals correctly to stop creep. That, and they are stomping on their pedals like neanderthals at a paleolithic hoe-down.

I agree with another poster re the primary role of bass drums spurs being the leveling of the drum laterally (side to side). Next purpose is elevating the front/reso side so that the drum sits flat when the kick pedal is inserted under the batter side hoop. Now the bass drum is elevated evenly; left/right and front/back.

Most bass drum spurs, and kick pedals, include adjustable spikes. Extend those about a 1/4 inch. The weight of the bass drum, plus toms if mounted, will push the spike tips - drum and pedal, into the carpet underneath. This locks the drum in place. No creep.

*Note: If your kick pedal isn't sitting flat - ie. the heel is off the floor/carpet - lower the front/reso spurs a touch. Evenly, on both sides. Or add a small piece of cardboard (a folded stick sleeve works great) directly under where the kick pedal clamps to the hoop.

Once in a while I hit a stage that is a little wonky. One, or both of these, set the kick perfectly. Again... no creep.
 
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I just got a Kick Blocker to reduce kick drum creep. Hopefully it works.
 
I much prefer modern bass drum spurs to the old ones. I used to have a Corder set that had the Fibes type of spur, easy to lose because it was not attached to the drums. I also used to have Slingerland set with spurs that came out of the bass drum too. Peace and goodwill.
 
I have to jump on the anti-vintage spurs bandwagon. I hate them, I've always hated them, and those alone have kept me from exploring owning a vintage kit. Vintage spurs, for whatever reason, were designed solely to prevent the bass drum from rocking side to side. They do practically nothing to prevent it from creeping forward as you play. That's why there are anti-creep products on the market—for VINTAGE spurs, not modern ones.

As for the OP pic, those are normal-sized spurs extended all the way. The spurs themselves are the same as on any modern bass drum, but extended all the way to compensate for the bass drum riser lifting the kick so far off the ground (that's a Brooklyn Micro Bop kit, so it has a tiny 16" bass drum). I use a much smaller riser on my 18" bop kick, so I don't have to extend my spurs nearly as far.

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Center of the shell mounted 60's Sonor spurs and housings are the lightest most reliable to prevent creeping . You can sharpen those on a grinder to needle points . My favourite .
 
I think it suggests that a lot of people do not set up their drums and pedals correctly to stop creep. That, and they are stomping on their pedals like neanderthals at a paleolithic hoe-down.
Yep. The infamous "Elvin Jones nailing his bass drum to the floor" ..... there are a few problems here, all adding up to a "perfect storm" of bass drum creep. Drum pedals didn't have velcro covered floorplates back then.;) I've seen pictures of Elvin using a Gretsch Floating action (later converted to chain drive) ..... and them later a Camco by Tama pedal. Neither of those pedals have extendable spikes, let alone velcro (or a way to put velcro on them - wire frame and no floorplate). So ....... you have a hard, smooth floor combined with straight nail spurs (50's/60's Gretsch Round Badge) and then vintage drum pedal technology (or lack thereof). Let the slippin' and sliding begin:LOL:

Charlie Watts Round Badge kit has probably got more frequent flyer miles on it, than any other drum kit with "big nail" spurs ..... and Charlie added creeper spikes to his front hoop, and used a rug. Speed King man, so no sophisticated technology there.

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If anyone has 5 minutes and $4, you can bend and sharpen aluminum stock for your vintage stuff. I have yet to have an issue with any of my 60’s kits from Ludwig, Rogers, or the lowly Whitehall which has Slingerland knock-off legs akin to the type @Rock Salad posted.

Memory locks or worm/hose clamps are a must for retractable or gullwing for me. A spiked anchor on the reso side works well if you clobber.

The legs on my Starclassic Maple are the business, and though heavy, will survive alongside the cockroaches when the aliens destroy us.
 
Well from my own experience, I have a heavy foot and I really drive it home. I had to upgrade my 70s Ludwig spurs with newer Gibraltar ones.

Recently, I bought a drum anchor for the front of my 1970 slingerland. Those spurs are a joke but the drum anchor actually works pretty well.
 
I think the opposite. I think vintage bass drum spurs are lacking.

As Steve Smith has said, jazz is built from the cymbal down, while rock is from the bass drum up.

Vintage spurs are often small because jazz players tend to either feather the bass drum or only use it for accents. While rock drummers tend to hit the bass drum consistently hard. Vintage spurs simply aren't designed for modern rock playing, hence why they've gotten bigger over time.
I have a 1950s/60s bass drum with no built-in spurs. I got hold of (I forget how) a pair of hoop-mounted, attachment spurs that hold it - but you have to get them in just the right place so once you've taken the off the drum - forget about setting it up with them again in under five minutes. I can have a fairly heavy right foot so it's not impossible to get spurs that work, it's just that all else being equal I'd rather have modern telescopics. After all, from behind the kit I can't really see them...
 
I have a 1950s/60s bass drum with no built-in spurs. I got hold of (I forget how) a pair of hoop-mounted, attachment spurs that hold it - but you have to get them in just the right place so once you've taken the off the drum - forget about setting it up with them again in under five minutes.
The DW clamp on spurs are probably the best. About $70. Danmar's are a bit more retro, cost about $40 ..... but don't work as well. And if what you've got are true vintage clamp ons ...... I feel your pain;)
 
The 70s premier spurs were pretty good, other than that the older spurs are awful.

You end up having to buy a bass drum anchor which looks pretty darn cool
 
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