Who played it first?

Stroman

Platinum Member
I was watching the 'Tube the other night, and wanted to check out some Aynsley Dunbar. One of the Journey songs I watched was 'Wheel in the Sky.' Even though I've heard the song thousands of times, it never really occurred to me how similar this fill is to a much more widely air-drummed fill that came three years later. Have a listen...



 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I look upon drum fills as eternal truths. No one really creates them; they just hover in space and wait to be recruited. They have no origin and will meet no end. They'll outlive all of us, and even when no one exists to play them, they'll occupy some hidden crevice in a remote corner of the stratosphere, silently loitering until evolution reinstates their purpose. Such is the nature of the collective unconscious.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
I look upon drum fills as eternal truths. No one really creates them; they just hover in space and wait to be recruited. They have no origin and will meet no end. They'll outlive all of us, and even when no one exists to play them, they'll occupy some hidden crevice in a remote corner of the stratosphere, silently loitering until evolution reinstates their purpose. Such is the nature of the collective unconscious.
There is a lot of truth to that. Rhythmically, there is not much new under the sun.

And for the record, I wasn't implying anything negative about Phil Collins. I was really just amazed that I was so familiar with both pieces of music, and never actually noticed how similar the fills are.
 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
Well Phil was himself doing that particular fill throughout much of the 70s. Here he is doing it on the live seconds out released in 1977.


Hard to say who did it first. But there can be no doubt Phil created one of if not the most iconic drum fills ever!
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Anyone with a lesser kit wouldn't able to play it. Three piece kit, no way.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
I love me some Aynsley Dunbar, the guy practically came out of retirement to record the Whitesnake 87 album, and of course he absolutely smashed it...the rhythmic similarities can’t be denied but the musical context and impact of the fills are very, very different...great spot though @Stroman , enjoyed listening to both as always! (y) :D
 
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Bozozoid

Well-known member
I look upon drum fills as eternal truths. No one really creates them; they just hover in space and wait to be recruited. They have no origin and will meet no end. They'll outlive all of us, and even when no one exists to play them, they'll occupy some hidden crevice in a remote corner of the stratosphere, silently loitering until evolution reinstates their purpose. Such is the nature of the collective unconscious.
[/QUOTE unless......you are John Henry Bonham and live in a non affected musical void separated from all that is....was....or ever shall be.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
unless......you are John Henry Bonham and live in a non affected musical void separated from all that is....was....or ever shall be.​

Or unless you're Carmine Appice, who, in an interview, implies that he exhibited aspects of Bonham's style and technique before Bonham himself did. He even states that Bonham acknowledged that fact. He also purports to have orchestrated Bonham's Ludwig endorsement.

I very much believe that every drummer is the product of other drummers. Nothing is purely original, just uniquely adapted.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
Or unless you're Carmine Appice, who, in an interview, implies that he exhibited aspects of Bonham's style and technique before Bonham himself did. He even states that Bonham acknowledged that fact. He also purports to have orchestrated Bonham's Ludwig endorsement.

I very much believe that every drummer is the product of other drummers. Nothing is purely original, just uniquely adapted.
(exhibited aspects)..it ended...there. I do like Carmine quite alot but Bonham is well?...God.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
(exhibited aspects)..it ended...there. I do like Carmine quite alot but Bonham is well?...God.

I'm not siding with Carmine per se, just pointing out that there are always conflicting views in circulation with regard to questions such as "Who did this first?"
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Back to the "In the Air Tonight" fill,

Phill always said he was inspired by a fill he heard Chester play on a Frank Zappa record.
Ansley Dumbar also played with Zappa, so they're drawing from the same well, so to speak.

But the In the Air Tonight fill is also identical in rhythm (though phrased very differently across the drum set) to the fill Ringo Star plays on "Here Comes the Sun" from 1969.

So, while Phill's fill is iconic and legendary, Phill himself has never claimed it was an original idea. What Phill did that was original was it's placement in the song, and the fact the drums were so loud in the mix so that fill stands out.

It wasn't the notes he played, but how he played those notes in context that made the fill iconic.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
same fill is in Jack and Diane by Kenny Arnoff as well...going back to @C.M. Jones concept of the fruit hanging out there, waiting to be grabbed
 
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