Who do you select for a Studio Drum Coach?

DancingMadlyBackwards

Senior Member
Hypothetical Question.

You are in the recording studio with your band recording 10 songs in the rock/progressive vein. The demos got your band signed and now with a budget and a producer the red light fever has awakened some demons. You are at odds with the producer who wants to bring in a ringer to handle the drums....the band stood up for you and a compromise was reached; a portion of the $ will be used to bring in a coach to work you through the tunes. Who do you choose?

Me: Bissonette
 

Duck Tape

Platinum Member
Greg is awesome and he is categorised as a ''studio'' guy but if it's prog rock then I'll be asking for Virgil.
 

eclipseownzu

Gold Member
Matt Cameron.

I have been to a couple of different clinics and things he has done and he does a great job of putting the language of drums into lamen terms. I'm not sure he could fix a hack like me, but it sure would be fun to work with him.
 

MileHighDrummer

Senior Member
It used to be done quite a bit back in the day (70's) and into the 80's when I was recording a lot. Band drummer's are rarely as accomplished as studio/session players. They would lay down the drum tracks and let the band's drummer handle the touring. It can save a lot of time and money. Don't let it bug you. :)
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
I would chose an outgoing attractive female with an impressive rack.

The sight of her would calm my nerves.

Maybe I should put up a CL ad for her.

"attractive female needed for drummer to look at while laying down tracks in the studio"
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Work me through the tunes?!

...I select option 3...use the money to hire a better producer.
 

BillRayDrums

Gold Member
Personally I think all bands should record their rehearsals and gigs and listen back to the performances every time. That way you can hear the weak spots and fix them accordingly. When it's time to go to the "real" studio then it's so much easier to play the "distilled" versions.

They're "your" tunes, own them!
 

Taye-Dyed

Senior Member
For a coach, I probably would go with someone with teaching experience as well as studio chops.

As far as your band using a different drummer in the studio, I have experienced it. I play for a singer/songwriter, who decided to record his last CD in Nashville with studio musicians rather than using his live band and a local facility. Hearing the songs I play week in/week out played by another drummer was very interesting and educational for me. I put them in three categories:

1- The "studio ace" played some of the songs/parts just like I do, so it was kind of flattering/validating for me.

2- On some songs, he had a completely different approach than me. For the most part, I was impressed with how he played those and I ended up adopting them. It was like free lessons for me!

3- I did not like his interpretation/feel on just a couple of songs, so I continue to play them my own way. For example, on an upbeat song, he went with a disco beat whereas I play it in a galloping/stomping style that adds more punch to the song.
 

DrummerMic

Member
I'd get Steve Gadd.
I mean, do studio drummers get any better? Actually, I'd quit and have him play on the tracks and tell everyone that it was me playing. Maybe I'd gain fame and fortune.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
I'd get Steve Gadd.
I mean, do studio drummers get any better? Actually, I'd quit and have him play on the tracks and tell everyone that it was me playing. Maybe I'd gain fame and fortune.
+1.. Steve Gadd,JR Robinson,Vinny,Hal Blane,Paul Leim,our own Bill Bachman, Bermuda or Derrik Roddy..

But if I'm MrPockets,Emanuelle Caplette,Meytal Cohn,Hanna Ford,Cindy Blackman,or Shelia E.:)

Steve B
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
How about have someone really clean like Weckl or Novak lay down what the band's drummer was trying to do, then let them try to play along? Mix and blend where necessary. Done all the time with pop vocals.
 

mrmike

Silver Member
Is it not the producers role to get the best performances possible? You could bring in anybody in the world but if your drummer is not ready at this time there is probably no magic secret to make him instantly ready. It's going to take hard work and a bit of time.

I say bring in the ringer and hope it motivates your drummer to figure out what it takes to become great on record. That's what happened to Kenny Aronoff, Nigel Olsen and Michael Derosier just to name a few.
 

GBaslDrums

Member
My top three coaches would have to be:

1. Jeff Porcaro
2. Jeff Porcaro
3. Jeff Porcaro

Once Jeff arrived, I would apologize to the producer, explain to him why he was right for wanting to bring in an outside drummer, and convince him to let Jeff play all of the tracks. I would then sit back and witness Jeff nail each tune on the very first take.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
It used to be done quite a bit back in the day (70's) and into the 80's when I was recording a lot. Band drummer's are rarely as accomplished as studio/session players. They would lay down the drum tracks and let the band's drummer handle the touring. It can save a lot of time and money. Don't let it bug you. :)
That was certainly more prevalent back in the day, when drummers had learned from other drummers who were still transitioning from big band, jazz, latin, etc. They weren't usually solid rock/pop drummers, and fusion and funk was new and mysterious for most. But drummers in the last 20-25 years in particular have grown up with more contemporary and versatile drumming heroes, and those styles and techniques are thankfully still current. Also, tips and info about professionalism has been widespread since the '80s thanks to Modern Drummer & DRUM!, and starting in the '90s thanks to the internet and drum forums like this. Prior to that, there was very little shared info about how to approach parts, practicing, auditions, what to expect in the studio or on tour, etc etc.

Today's drummers are truly better equipped to handle musical situations, than they ever were in the past.

But, ghost drumming does still happen a little bit, and ringers are still brought in when necessary, and for different reasons. In Nashville for example, there are still studio drummers, and touring drummers. I guess that means twice as many drummers are working, but only half the time. :)

I've been lucky enough to pull off a lot of styles without resorting to bringing in someone who specializes. Even percussion parts are handled by me, although there are a few times I would have been proud to defer to masters like Luis Conté or Alex Acuña. But if something really technical came my way, and a Vinnie or Dennis Chambers or Derek Roddy was called in, I'd take some glee in annouincing that "it took Vinnie to replace me!"

Bermuda
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Toss up between Greg Bissonette because he is such a nice person.

And Kenny Arnoff, simply because many times I've recorded with the thought of "what would Kenny do here?"
 
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