Who Are The Worst Drummers That Are Good In Spite Of How Lousy They Are?

ricky

Senior Member
If you had only worded the thread title better. "Lousy" is a bit harsh if you're not actually trying to be negative.
I thought people would get it...I really did. Just goes to show you. I'll try not to be sarcastic or unclear again. If possible. :rolleyes:

I am a musician though, and a Beatle fan. Being sarcastic or saying things in a "funny" way is sort of second nature. But this is the internet, and I don't hang out here much, so you all don't know me or my intentions, etc....so my bad. I’m not saying that we’re better or greater, or comparing us with Ringo as a person or God as a thing or whatever it is. I just said what I said and it was wrong. Or it was taken wrong. And now it’s all this.
 

Arkansmay

Member
If you know what I mean...:)

For example, Ringo is not technically great in many ways, but nevertheless he is GREAT. He overcomes whatever skills he may lack with creativity and feel and playing cool licks and playing the right thing for the song, etc etc etc.

Who else do you think is great like that?

I know what you are saying but disagree with the premise not on account of being offended, but due to the fact that technical ability and expertise doesn't make someone a good artist in whatever field it might be, musically or otherwise. Maybe that is the premise of the thread? :)
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
. . . technical ability and expertise doesn't make someone a good artist . . . .
Boy, did you get that right! And the painful truth of the matter has struck me several times over the last couple of years when I bought albums (do we still call them that?) by a few "supergroup" entities. I won't name the specific groups here (for obvious reasons) but there was no doubt that the musicians involved in these projects were some of the best in the world today. But I was amazed not by their musicianship or technical abilities, but by their inability to write interesting songs.

I waded through song after song while trying to find something akin to good songwriting. But there was no rising tension, or climax, or denouement to be found. Hooks? Nada. It was almost as if these guys simply tossed around some ideas in the studio, threw them into verse/chorus/solo/chorus/outro and depended on their exceptional musicianship to carry the tune. Some of the "tunes" were almost embarrassing.

These groups were made up of renown musicians popular with the current generation, so I gave them to my son and his wife, and my grandchildren for their assessment, thinking that I'd missed something. But even they refused to endure more than one audition of each album. So I trolled the various musical review sites for the views of their music critics. I was amazed that, almost without exception, the albums were received with very chilly reactions. For once, I agreed with the critics.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Bruce M. Thomson

Gold Member
I think the topic heading is a bit misleading. You may be asking about drummers who keep it simple, solid, creative and musical.
Quite honestly I doubt I would be listening to a band with a "lousy drummer" since chances are the band would really stink as well.
A couple of weeks ago I watched and heard a local band in a fairly large venue a pub-style restaurant/bar with stone floors, and was impressed with their drummer precisely because he kept it so simple; he just played a simple pattern on the bass drum and a solid snap on the snare, and it was ages into a song before the right-hand came out of hibernation and did anything. It blended so well with the acoustic, electric and bass guitars; he was using a 16' bass drum, and 10 & 14 " toms. When he did incorporate his other hand, it added to the blend seamlessly.
Because of this, the band had a very clear and definite and at times very majestic sound. I later found out that he had played for Lawrence Gowan at one time who was originally a keyboard player for Ronnie Hawkins then had a solo career and is now a member of STYX.
It was not what he played so much as how he played. Simple but no slouch.

Here is a good example of what simple but effective is.
 
Last edited:

dmacc_2

Well-known member
If the ‘offended / irritated’ comments are directed at me, I can assure you, as a New Yorker – it’s not possible to offend me. And nothing can be put out on any internet forum that would irritate me.

What is possible after spending decades studying the instrument with world class teachers and playing with high caliber players is to gauge questions that are based on negative slants. This is one of those. That said, the forums exists for all ideas and opinions. Mine happens to only be one of them.

When you open your eyes, ears and mind wide enough and you begin to realize that everyone comes at music from a different place, then you begin to not find analyzing or judging important – other than doing it to yourself and for yourself.

I’m out. LOL.....
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
If you know what I mean...:)

For example, Ringo is not technically great in many ways, but nevertheless he is GREAT. He overcomes whatever skills he may lack with creativity and feel and playing cool licks and playing the right thing for the song, etc etc etc.

Who else do you think is great like that?
Ringo is an interesting example, because they hired him to replace another drummer, just before they made it big, evidently for his technical skills.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Ringo is an interesting example, because they hired him to replace another drummer, just before they made it big, evidently for his technical skills.
I would believe it if they replaced the first guy with Ringo because his drumming was more inventive. Their sound was extraordinarily unique and fresh, and I'd bet their first drummer's playing was too predictable and uninspired.

But I'd find another line of work if I was replaced by Ringo because he was more technically skilled.
 
Last edited:

Seafroggys

Silver Member
Its a manner of perspective. Ringo *was*, by all accounts, the best drummer in Liverpool. He was sought after by a lot of the Liverpool groups, The Beatles included. They jumped on him the moment they were big enough to have the clout to pull him away from Rory Storm.

Pete Best, at the same time, was not a good drummer. Listen to their recording of Love Me Do with him on it. Ooof.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Let’s be fair, though—-how many drummers in the early 60s had metronome-quality time, compared to today? Now a TON of guys can easily play to a click, and have zero trouble with time. It’s just part of the business now. Back then? No.
 

ricky

Senior Member
What is possible after spending decades studying the instrument with world class teachers and playing with high caliber players is to gauge questions that are based on negative slants. This is one of those.
No it is not from a "negative slant" at all. In fact, it is from a very very very positive slant. That was clear, imo, in the first post because I praised Ringo.
And it was explained later a number of times after some people made a stink.

Obviously it wasn't clear for some, but oh well.
 

ricky

Senior Member
Pete Best, at the same time, was not a good drummer. Listen to their recording of Love Me Do with him on it. Ooof.
That's true, but I do enjoy his drumming on the Decca tapes. He was famous (in Liverpool) for his so called "atom beat". 4 on the floor kick and a rolling tom beat. I like it, but obviously Ringo was the right drummer for The Beatles.

But see, the idea is to be positive about drummers who aren't technical monsters or considered "great" by, uh, other drummers!
 

ricky

Senior Member
Ringo is an interesting example, because they hired him to replace another drummer, just before they made it big, evidently for his technical skills.
Another drummer who occasionally replaced Ringo on Beatles tracks, and I suppose in ways was worse than Pete Best, was another of my all time favorite drummers...the lousy Sir Paul McCartney!
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
Let’s be fair, though—-how many drummers in the early 60s had metronome-quality time, compared to today? Now a TON of guys can easily play to a click, and have zero trouble with time. It’s just part of the business now. Back then? No.
Exactly. Really, Britain in the early 60's didn't really have many stellar drummers....at the time, they were all Americans! Morello, Buddy, Roach, Belleson, the list goes on. The bar was a lot lower back then, and especially for that geographic area!

In that context, Ringo really was "stellar" (heheh). Now granted George Martin did have session drummer Andy White play on one version of Love Me Do, but in all honesty I think that was just testy skepticism on his part, if you listen to both the Ringo and Andy versions (both released, one was the single and one was the album) the drumming is very, very similar. I don't think Andy was some chops monster, I just think Martin wanted to play it safe for the first single by using a known entity.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
wow! I'm offended by people who are offended when asking for opinions and getting all out of shape over the responses that are "insensitive" "politically incorrect" "downright mean" "sarcastic" " "too ethnic" "inconsiderate" "phobic" etc. and blah blah blah. These are the same people that are proponents of diversity (as long as it fits THEIR idea of diversity). Lighten up folks. Everyone has opinions whether you like them or not. The key to diversity is acceptance. You drummers at all levels of accomplishment keep posting what you think and keep in mind with the passing of time and life experience you may not be as rigid in your ways as you were. Okay that said....
"These 2 drummers walk into a bar...."
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
That's true, but I do enjoy his drumming on the Decca tapes. He was famous (in Liverpool) for his so called "atom beat". 4 on the floor kick and a rolling tom beat. I like it, but obviously Ringo was the right drummer for The Beatles.

But see, the idea is to be positive about drummers who aren't technical monsters or considered "great" by, uh, other drummers!
Exactly. Really, Britain in the early 60's didn't really have many stellar drummers....at the time, they were all Americans! Morello, Buddy, Roach, Belleson, the list goes on. The bar was a lot lower back then, and especially for that geographic area!

In that context, Ringo really was "stellar" (heheh). Now granted George Martin did have session drummer Andy White play on one version of Love Me Do, but in all honesty I think that was just testy skepticism on his part, if you listen to both the Ringo and Andy versions (both released, one was the single and one was the album) the drumming is very, very similar. I don't think Andy was some chops monster, I just think Martin wanted to play it safe for the first single by using a known entity.
I guess it is OK to encourage drummers from cultures where drumming isn't revered, but there are lots of better cultures out there when it comes to drumming. There are cultures where you know, non-drummers appreciate drumming.
 

mrfingers

Senior Member
“Exactly. Really, Britain in the early 60's didn't really have many stellar drummers....at the time, they were all Americans! Morello, Buddy, Roach, Belleson, the list goes on. The bar was a lot lower back then, and especially for that geographic area”

uh, G.Baker, C. Powell, J. Hiseman, K.Hartlee(sp?), BJ Wilson, Bonham, M.Mitchell...
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I am seeing this thread as a chops vs feel thread.

Which we learned a long time ago is a huge minefield judging from the many past incarnations.

Ricky you say you are new here, so you wouldn't know the sordid history this EXACT type of thread has.

It's a topic that his been Done. To. Death. Here. With bad results always.

Believe me when I tell you...these threads never turn out good. You can see that for yourself already.

There have been personal threats made over this very topic. Ask Matt Smith.

That's why you are getting the flack you're getting. I don't dislike you one bit, it's the topic that creates the issue.

FWIW, I had to learn this myself and posted some stuff years ago that I regret now. I got schooled.

The thing that makes this place great is the respect shown.

C vs F threads been done so many times that it's a bad cliche at this point to the entrenched members.

You can't throw an M-80 into a crowd and then criticize the crowd for the reaction.

And it was an M-80 even if that wasn't your intention, even if you will never see it that way.

I don't feel you had troll intentions at all, you seem pretty cool, but you did unwittingly stumble onto pretty much the most volatile thread topic going here.

It's not your bad, it's just a Drummerworld forum learning curve. It's kind of an innocent mis-step.

I for one hope you hang around. You seem like you have a lot to offer. Plus the more the merrier.
 
Last edited:

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
“Exactly. Really, Britain in the early 60's didn't really have many stellar drummers....at the time, they were all Americans! Morello, Buddy, Roach, Belleson, the list goes on. The bar was a lot lower back then, and especially for that geographic area”

uh, G.Baker, C. Powell, J. Hiseman, K.Hartlee(sp?), BJ Wilson, Bonham, M.Mitchell...
None of those guys comes close to Morello in taste and finesse, or Buddy in sheer chops and cleanness of rudimental execution. IMHO
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
“Exactly. Really, Britain in the early 60's didn't really have many stellar drummers....at the time, they were all Americans! Morello, Buddy, Roach, Belleson, the list goes on. The bar was a lot lower back then, and especially for that geographic area”

uh, G.Baker, C. Powell, J. Hiseman, K.Hartlee(sp?), BJ Wilson, Bonham, M.Mitchell...
They were all after Ringo. Read my post again and the dates I used.
 
Top