WHISKEY DRINKERS?

brentcn

Platinum Member
Is whiskey bourbon?..can bourbon be whiskey?. What is the difference in taste. I also hear bourbon sippers say that you want single malt..why?. One of these Saturday nights I might put on a cartegen sweater and stroll in doing my best Rat Pack cool guy asking for a single malt but I need to know what I'm talking about.

To be labeled “straight bourbon”, the mash bill must be at least 50% corn, and it must be aged at least 2 years in a charred oak barrel. To be a straight rye, the mash bill must be at least 50% rye, plus the 2 years in the charred oak barrel.

Bourbon drinkers often prefer single barrel (not single malt; that’s a Scotch thing), because said barrel has been selected by professional tasters and connoisseurs to be better than other barrels of the same lot. It’s the cream of the crop, so to speak.
 

SVBJECT

Well-known member
To be labeled “straight bourbon”, the mash bill must be at least 50% corn, and it must be aged at least 2 years in a charred oak barrel. To be a straight rye, the mash bill must be at least 50% rye, plus the 2 years in the charred oak barrel.

Bourbon drinkers often prefer single barrel (not single malt; that’s a Scotch thing), because said barrel has been selected by professional tasters and connoisseurs to be better than other barrels of the same lot. It’s the cream of the crop, so to speak.

Fun Fact, to be the pedant, at least 50% corn is right, but did you know it ifs over 80% corn it is no longer bourbon? At that point it becomes corn whiskey, which does not need any aging to call a whiskey, although it would be more frequently called Moonshine, White Dog, New Make, Poitin, etc etc

Single Barrel of what? Scotch? Or bourbon. As far as I'm aware Single Barrel or Single Cask has no legal conditions in US, there are brands with a single cask release that is actually just a blend of fewer barrels "designed to taste like the founders first ever cask," or some marketing rubbish, but it doesn't actually demand the spirit came from one barrel.

Scotch terms, single cask is what I'd aim for if I could at almost all times, the difference between a blend and a malt (ie, the blend will have fewer distinctive characteristics but more of a rich rounded flavour, smoothed off rough edges, but fewer subtle quircks) and single malt and a single cask is the opposite differences, so the single cask will have a less rounded flavour, more nuances and individuality in character. Harder to find and more expensive, but well worth it if you're into whisky.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Fun Fact, to be the pedant, at least 50% corn is right, but did you know it ifs over 80% corn it is no longer bourbon? At that point it becomes corn whiskey, which does not need any aging to call a whiskey, although it would be more frequently called Moonshine, White Dog, New Make, Poitin, etc etc

Single Barrel of what? Scotch? Or bourbon. As far as I'm aware Single Barrel or Single Cask has no legal conditions in US, there are brands with a single cask release that is actually just a blend of fewer barrels "designed to taste like the founders first ever cask," or some marketing rubbish, but it doesn't actually demand the spirit came from one barrel.

Scotch terms, single cask is what I'd aim for if I could at almost all times, the difference between a blend and a malt (ie, the blend will have fewer distinctive characteristics but more of a rich rounded flavour, smoothed off rough edges, but fewer subtle quircks) and single malt and a single cask is the opposite differences, so the single cask will have a less rounded flavour, more nuances and individuality in character. Harder to find and more expensive, but well worth it if you're into whisky.
That's interesting-I was wary of the single barrel/cask jargon-it's still blended eh. Funny thing about shine is people make it with other than pure corn-so malted or plain barley, rye, or wheat. So technically it isn't moonshine when other grains added. Crazy nomenclature. My Dad always drank Lord Calvert blended Canadian whiskey or Crown Royal. The locals made corn moonshine-no other grains and no fruity stuff and that stuff makes a fine pickling solution and jet fuel LOL. I have to admit the new generation of moonshiners made with corn or other grains does taste better-it's still pickling solution (once over 70% ethanol you in pickling territory). One of the best preservatives for chick embryos and immunostaining was using a precipitating fixative Methacarn-60%Methanol, 30% chloroform, and 10% glacial acetic acid-preserve protein epitopes for antibody work and preserve nucleic acids so you can do PCR.
 

SVBJECT

Well-known member
That's interesting-I was wary of the single barrel/cask jargon-it's still blended eh. Funny thing about shine is people make it with other than pure corn-so malted or plain barley, rye, or wheat. So technically it isn't moonshine when other grains added. Crazy nomenclature. My Dad always drank Lord Calvert blended Canadian whiskey or Crown Royal. The locals made corn moonshine-no other grains and no fruity stuff and that stuff makes a fine pickling solution and jet fuel LOL. I have to admit the new generation of moonshiners made with corn or other grains does taste better-it's still pickling solution (once over 70% ethanol you in pickling territory). One of the best preservatives for chick embryos and immunostaining was using a precipitating fixative Methacarn-60%Methanol, 30% chloroform, and 10% glacial acetic acid-preserve protein epitopes for antibody work and preserve nucleic acids so you can do PCR.
Would be hard to make pure corn, barley contains enzymes which help the fermentation. Pure grains other than barley are more common now because we can add the enzymes, but traditionally they'd have become very thick and porridgey during fermentation, its at least partly why barley stayed in us in bourbon, usually about 5-15% or something....However, specifics of moonshining traditions aren't something I really know much about as it was very different in UK - although still similar illegal distilling practices.

Some american single cask/barrel are still blended, usually its extra small batch though, where as mass produced bourbon bottles are mixed from thousands of barrels, and a Single Malt is still a "blend" although its called marrying in single malt terms. Glenmorangie Orginal (for instance, as a well known pretty large production but respectable scotch) single malt. It tastes identical every year but if it wasn't blended, then it would vary and become a vintage like with wine, and it would change year on year.
Its the job of the master blender to make it identical every time using different casks If the years whisky is less sweat say, he might add more to the marriage from a sherry barrel. In Scotch terms, Single Malt means all the malt is a) barley and b) distilled in the same distillery. Single grain - all one grain, one distillery. Blended grains or blended malt is from different distilleries. If it has an age, that's the youngest drop in the bottle. So 10 year old might have some 25 year old in it, but wont have any 9 year old.

A single Cask Scotch, quite literally, came from one barrel. It was all fermented and distilled together and aged together and poured from barrel to bottle together. These bottles usually have a "bottle 79/545" and a cask number. Different in the US and Ireland, or anywhere else really, although Japanese I think for the most part tries to stay to the Scotch traditions for the most part.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
As a non drinking alcoholic, I find it fascinating that some of y'all can have a drink without wanting another for like 6 months, and can talk as in depth about alcohol as this thread is without wanting to get sloshed. My brain doesnt work like that with alcohol so I find it quite amazing.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I drank a lot but never considered myself an alcoholic- I used it to cut edge of other things I was abusing. I started with “diet pills” my Dad gave me when I got fat at 13-14 then tried tobacco and beer and etc etc etc . So there was a hierarchy of addictions -first diet pills then sleeping pills which was way harder than diet pills-I can go on and on. So relatively speaking alcohol isn’t thst difficult . Especially now it really messes with my gut- if I drink a lot over 2-3 days I get this dyspeptic miserable stomach pain and I feel like I’ve got stomach cancer. I don’t they looked actually. I couldn’t believe it I just knew I was dying . I had to quit drinking about everything but water then bland diet and take probiotics for months before everything reset. Even if I skip days drinking 2-3 out of a two week period it just kills me. It’s a freaking curse- I always liked to drink on vacation, holidays , with friends, when we got a grant or published a paper, when a child was born, whenever I left my tea- totaling in- laws, and on weekends and trying to get my wife drunk to lower her inhibitions.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
As a non drinking alcoholic, I find it fascinating that some of y'all can have a drink without wanting another for like 6 months, and can talk as in depth about alcohol as this thread is without wanting to get sloshed. My brain doesnt work like that with alcohol so I find it quite amazing.
It’s good that you’re aware of your alcoholism mate. I can seriously take it or leave it, but it’s dangerous stuff and no surprise that people get addicted to it. It’s definitely to be respected and other than the odd blow out it should be taken in moderation…if I got smashed out of my face every time I had a drink that would be a red flag and quite worrying… :unsure:
 

SVBJECT

Well-known member
As a non drinking alcoholic, I find it fascinating that some of y'all can have a drink without wanting another for like 6 months, and can talk as in depth about alcohol as this thread is without wanting to get sloshed. My brain doesnt work like that with alcohol so I find it quite amazing.
I work in alcohol, so I've also seen, and I guess contributed to, many people suffering from alcoholism. I'm glad it sounds like you are in control of it, its not pleasant. But, I talk booze every day pretty much, which I know for some people leads to getting sloshed every day, and some wont ever stop. Its an easy trap to fall into though
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Well Subject it’s an interesting subject ( even if you don’t drink) because it’s historical, cultural , evolutionary significance. I remember they found some Scotch of a special recipe in Antarctic they retrieved just for a sample to study and then returned . Mac something
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
It’s good that you’re aware of your alcoholism mate. I can seriously take it or leave it, but it’s dangerous stuff and no surprise that people get addicted to it. It’s definitely to be respected and other than the odd blow out it should be taken in moderation…if I got smashed out of my face every time I had a drink that would be a red flag and quite worrying… :unsure:
I work in alcohol, so I've also seen, and I guess contributed to, many people suffering from alcoholism. I'm glad it sounds like you are in control of it, its not pleasant. But, I talk booze every day pretty much, which I know for some people leads to getting sloshed every day, and some wont ever stop. Its an easy trap to fall into though
With me, drinking only leads to more drinking. Only do I stop after 1 of 2 things:
1. I pass out
2. I run out of alcohol and no one will drive me to get more

It flips some kind of switch. There is no enjoyment, only constant consumption. I usually wake up the next day not remembering anything, only feeling horrible. This was an everyday thing for more years than I'd like to admit.

I like reading all this stuff though.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
With me, drinking only leads to more drinking. Only do I stop after 1 of 2 things:
1. I pass out
2. I run out of alcohol and no one will drive me to get more

It flips some kind of switch. There is no enjoyment, only constant consumption. I usually wake up the next day not remembering anything, only feeling horrible. This was an everyday thing for more years than I'd like to admit.

I like reading all this stuff though.

That’s quite a burden, for sure. I have a friend who had the same reaction to alcohol, except it was once a week instead of every day. Eventually, it harmed his relationships, and his romantic life, enough to where he decided to stay sober for good.

It really is a brain chemistry, genetic thing. I usually don’t enjoy getting sloshed, just relaxed. After a few, I don’t feel the urge to keep going. It’s not like I’m using any discipline or self-control, I’m just avoiding a feeling I don’t like, plus a hangover.
 

boosthill1

New member
If you are drinking whiskey as a mixed drink, it can induce intoxication, and lead to bad behavior. For example, iced tea with whiskey leads to the energy from the alcohol combined with the sugar in tea which can mean rapid drunkenness and headache in the morning. If you are drinking it straight or on ice, then there is too little booze going in for anything bad to happen. To avoid becoming drunk or hungover just don't drink beer or any other alcohol when you're drinking whiskey because those drinks add up quickly into your system.
 

The Shepherd

Well-known member
If you are drinking whiskey as a mixed drink, it can induce intoxication, and lead to bad behavior. For example, iced tea with whiskey leads to the energy from the alcohol combined with the sugar in tea which can mean rapid drunkenness and headache in the morning. If you are drinking it straight or on ice, then there is too little booze going in for anything bad to happen. To avoid becoming drunk or hungover just don't drink beer or any other alcohol when you're drinking whiskey because those drinks add up quickly into your system.

I suggest you rethink your post. You might want to do a bit of research from a credible source on the effects of alcohol consumption.
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
Haven't drunk much whisky in a very long time.

At the tender age of 19 following a shift from working at the local 5&10 one night,
one of my co workers bought me a quart (not a 5th) of something called Ye Olde Bourbon.
That night me and a buddy made a whole lot of whisky sours using a mixer called Wink.

First time I ever saw double was after consuming most of that quart(probably alcohol poising).

From that point onward ,I couldn't even stand the smell of bourbon whisky ,no matter how high class,let alone drink it.
No matter how good the Playboy ads mad it look,it was no more bourbon.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
With me, drinking only leads to more drinking. Only do I stop after 1 of 2 things:6
1. I pass out
2. I run out of alcohol and no one will drive me to get more

It flips some kind of switch. There is no enjoyment, only constant consumption. I usually wake up the next day not remembering anything, only feeling horrible. This was an everyday thing for more years than I'd like to admit.

I like reading all this stuff though.
You and me both, brother.
6yr friend of Bill.
 

blinky

Senior Member
On my way to alcoholism as I speak, there's really no shortcut, just hard work right? Sometimes things happen in life, and it's hard to cope. Whisky is a remedy, it just work, all angst disappear sort of. Got two days without it this last month. Don't want to end up as a sober alcoholist, so tomorrow there's nothing.
I'll practice drums instead, and drink some tea...
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I always wanted to kiss the Green Fairy and try absinthe. I've always liked gin (it has a unique flavor for a distilled spirit) but tequila is something I've stayed away from mostly till about last 3-4 years. When I was younger it brought out a violent nature in me when I would get really whacked (it made me crazy-a mean drunk)-when generally I'm a fun sedate drunk. I also have a gift of acting sober when I'm plastered because I don't have a single DUI-though I've been pulled over and even tested over and they still let me go every single time. I've got an Angel in my pocket apparently or I'm just an incredibly gifted actor. Now it's a sporadic 1-2 stiff drinks on occasion-instead of most or all of a bottle. I'm amazed at how polluted I get off such small amounts now. I know your liver enzymes change and respond to alcohol consumption to better metabolize it-so I must be back to default liver enzymes because I'm a wimp drinker-which I guess is a good thing.
 
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pgm554

Platinum Member
You and me both, brother.
6yr friend of Bill.
Lost quite a few high school friends to demon rum.
One got run over by a truck after coming out of a bar and was killed.
My best friend (and a great trumpet player)died from esophageal cancer caused by too much booze.
His brother was a hard core alky ,who died from diabetic complications brought on by alcoholism.
Another trumpet player friend drank too much gin in a drinking contest and developed pancreatitis.
 
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