Which techniques is he using?

I was looking at a video of Joey Jordison :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HV6bRebsxRQ

I use Joey as an example because i play a lot of slipknot, and metal in general and i need a lot of hand speed, i just learned disasterpiece (the song he's playing in the video) and i can't play it clean because i end up getting tight, and i just don't have the hand speed, i'm almost there though.

To me it looks like he's using mostly wrists, which is kind of weird to me, is it worth to just train the hell out of my wrist speed? I can do finger technique on my right hand, and i can do it almost at 160bpm on my left hand, but maybe i just need to do wrists?
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Well, fingers are just fingers. They help control everything and can be used almost alone for certain things, but you're not gonna play anything loud and solid around a kit with just fingers.

The most important and fundamental of all things.

Wrists + Stick Control


If you isolate them, that's up to you.
 
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Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
He's using wrist, with some finger help. Ironically, he plays really "light". He pulls the sound out of the drums, so to speak, very much like a Cleveland-style (Duff-style) timpanist. I actually would have guessed that he trained with Duff or one of his students.

I was looking at a video of Joey Jordison :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HV6bRebsxRQ

I use Joey as an example because i play a lot of slipknot, and metal in general and i need a lot of hand speed, i just learned disasterpiece (the song he's playing in the video) and i can't play it clean because i end up getting tight, and i just don't have the hand speed, i'm almost there though.

To me it looks like he's using mostly wrists, which is kind of weird to me, is it worth to just train the hell out of my wrist speed? I can do finger technique on my right hand, and i can do it almost at 160bpm on my left hand, but maybe i just need to do wrists?
 
He's using wrist, with some finger help. Ironically, he plays really "light". He pulls the sound out of the drums, so to speak, very much like a Cleveland-style (Duff-style) timpanist. I actually would have guessed that he trained with Duff or one of his students.
Thanks for the help both of you! Can you guys recommend any exercises for wrist speed? I couldn't really find any ones that focused on wrists on youtube
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I really only use Stick Control.



This page is enough, but all the single stroke stuff, really.


Rhythm Scale

and

4 8 4 8 4 8 8 8 (4=16ths 8 = 32nds)

A similar exercise would be to use that SC page and play constant 16ths with one hand and filling in 32nds with the other hand on Ls. You can do that with 5/10 and 5/12 as well as interpretating the Rs as alternating doubling up on the Ls, too.

16ths at max tempo for 1 min with one hand

Stuff like that............


Don't forget to lead with the left also!! ;)


It's just single stroke exercises. The variations helps with boredom and offcourse help facilitate changes. An hour of this pr. day and things happen quickly.


You can do his with your feet on he bass drum too, if you like.
 
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Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Thanks for the help both of you! Can you guys recommend any exercises for wrist speed? I couldn't really find any ones that focused on wrists on youtube
There are three guys whose work I value tremendously for wrist/hand speed.

1. Gordy Knutson, and his push-pull stroke. He totally wrists it, zero finger help. He plays with good posture. Definitely heed his advice to play with heavy sticks on a very bouncy pad to start with. Definitely.

2. Jojo Mayer. He uses a lot more finger in his push-pull, which helped me in the beginning a lot. His DVD isn't free, but you can get it used on Amazon or eBay.

3. Bill Bachman's double-stroke exercises, especially IRISH SPRING, are the absolute BEST way to beautify your doubles. Use Jojo's or Gordy's push-pull with Bill's Irish Spring. Holy heck. Your doubles will sound like heaven.


Above all, keep your posture open, and play light like Jordison. Shoulders back and down, chin slightly tucked, elbows out, and keep your tailbone pointed down, not forward and down. Sit up straight, and always aim for a feeling of effortlessness and openness when you hit the drums. Think entire gestures, like you're dancing.

Gently pull the sound from the drum. It's that simple, more or less.
 

John Lamb

Senior Member
I see elbow rotation in the right and elbow flexion in the left. I also see a LOT of fingerwork.

And please DON'T isolate. It is a terrible idea.

The only time I ever advocate isolation is the get to know what movements are possible in the first place.

From a health perspective it is just asking for injury because it puts the stress and work of the entire movement on only one structure.This ends up damaging the structure that gets isolated. From a performance point of view, it is a giant facepalm. because why on earth would you NOT use your big guns if you want speed and endurance? The body is designed to work as a whole, and forcing a tiny structure to do the work that very large muscles are supposed to be doing is inefficient and ineffective. Your video is a case in point: Joey isn't isolating. I've an article coming out in DRUM! about this in July.
 
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